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  • DC Motors-Part 1/3: Continuous, Gear, Servo, Brushless and Coreless, Vibration, and Stepper, A Tutorial

    There probably is some formula, but at the age of fourteen, the only thing I did know, was that by decreasing the number of turns would lower the voltage. By lowering to voltage, the motor would draw more current. So, if the motor was wound with 22ga wire, I would replace it with 18ga wire, therefore I would have fewer turns per pole on the motor. I had always been interested in electronics and had got my Amateur Radio License when I was twelve. I understood the theory of what I was doing, but never knew of a formula for it! During my experiments, I wound some motors that turned so many rpm's, that they would sling the windings off the poles! When that happened, I would rewind with one size smaller wire to slow the motor down. About the time I turned sixteen, the slot car craze was over...see more »There probably is some formula, but at the age of fourteen, the only thing I did know, was that by decreasing the number of turns would lower the voltage. By lowering to voltage, the motor would draw more current. So, if the motor was wound with 22ga wire, I would replace it with 18ga wire, therefore I would have fewer turns per pole on the motor. I had always been interested in electronics and had got my Amateur Radio License when I was twelve. I understood the theory of what I was doing, but never knew of a formula for it! During my experiments, I wound some motors that turned so many rpm's, that they would sling the windings off the poles! When that happened, I would rewind with one size smaller wire to slow the motor down. About the time I turned sixteen, the slot car craze was over, and the two tracks near me had shut down. But for almost four years in the mid 1960's, it was a fun hobby.

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  • DC Motors-Part 1/3: Continuous, Gear, Servo, Brushless and Coreless, Vibration, and Stepper, A Tutorial

    Back in the early to mid 1960's, slot car tracks, and racing, were a big hobby. As a teen who was into electronics and anything electrical, I knew that by reducing the number of turns on each pole of those small motors would reduce the voltage rating of the motor. I used a slightly larger guage wire, and counted the turns of wire on the first pole until filled, then wound the same number of turns on each pole to keep the motor balanced. I won a lot of ribbons and trophies with my slot cars. I would usually lap the field of cars in a 100 lap race! I know I wasn't the first to discover this, because as the hobby grew, magazines that followed the slot care scene appeared on the market. It wasn't long until "my secret" was published and everyone with any soldering skill, did the s...see more »Back in the early to mid 1960's, slot car tracks, and racing, were a big hobby. As a teen who was into electronics and anything electrical, I knew that by reducing the number of turns on each pole of those small motors would reduce the voltage rating of the motor. I used a slightly larger guage wire, and counted the turns of wire on the first pole until filled, then wound the same number of turns on each pole to keep the motor balanced. I won a lot of ribbons and trophies with my slot cars. I would usually lap the field of cars in a 100 lap race! I know I wasn't the first to discover this, because as the hobby grew, magazines that followed the slot care scene appeared on the market. It wasn't long until "my secret" was published and everyone with any soldering skill, did the same.

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  • tcoe commented on MrJonesEducation's instructable Frankenstein Light Switch2 months ago
    Frankenstein Light Switch

    This type of switch is called a 'Knife Switch'. The way you have designed this, would be a double pole knife switch. A real knife switch is very dangerous, because the 'legs' of the switch would be hot with electricity when the switch closes, hence the wooden handle. This type switch was common in industrial settings until the enclosed switches were invented. These switches were very dangerous.I must compliment you on your quality of workmanship.

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