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5Instructables53,628Views26CommentsAda, OklahomaJoined October 28th, 2013
I am a computer nerd (CS degree by accident), bake bread, outdoors, build airplanes, balloons animals, photography. I have too many hobbies.

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  • tlandrum commented on tlandrum's instructable Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!1 month ago
    Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!

    I have looked into this (friend wanted to do it). You are better off if you make a fire pit, and the flue is a chamber that holds the pottery. Make sure you insulate all around REALLY well. You can't have too much when trying to get that hot. But you can the block up the chimney to increase the heat in the firing box. Kinda picture this... two of my ovens stacked one on top of the other (the bottom one can be a dug out hole in the ground... it loosing heat is not that important) with a hole in the back connecting the two. that way you can really crank up a big fire, and get that center chamber really hot!Good luck.

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  • tlandrum commented on tlandrum's instructable Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!4 months ago
    Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!

    You would need to make some modifications to the airflow as pottery needs to get much hotter. Now cob, absoutly you can make a kiln, but you will need a way to get increased amount of air to the wood, and usually have a separate fire and pottery chamber. This (not my design, but it is was all done right) would only get up to about 1200 MAX! And you would really have to work to get it that hot. Usually it is going to be half that.

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  • tlandrum's entry Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced! is a winner in the Bread Challenge 2017 contest 4 months ago
  • tlandrum's entry Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced! is a finalist in the Bread Challenge 2017 contest 4 months ago
  • tlandrum commented on Jack OAT's instructable Authentic Bavarian Pretzels4 months ago
    Authentic Bavarian Pretzels

    Yeah.... try testing if you like the lye or baked baking soda.... and you you your wife's very expensice caphalon pots.... that are aluminum!!!! The boiling water just speeds up the reaction!! Yeah, I got in a little trouble for that one!!!!I love publishing on here.... I end up learning so much about whatever I am making.

    OK, These look great!!! I would like to throw in a few suggestions... not saying they are better... but give them a try... you may like the results. I know I am going to do a taste test with both methods!Aluminum is even worse than steel... you will metal aluminum pot like I am going to tell in you a few min!!! BAD!Lye (sodium hydroxide) [pH~12] -- this is authentic, and I really want to try a cold lye technique... it may be even betterBaking soda (sodium bicarbonate) [pH~8] -- don't even bother... they are not worth it.Baked baking soda (sodium carbonate) [pH~11]-- Take your baking soda (1/8-1/4 cup or so) and bake it on a cookie sheet for 20min... an hour... something like that. then get a pot of boiling water (I use our large spaghetti pot.. just make sure it is steel!!!). Slowly an...

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    OK, These look great!!! I would like to throw in a few suggestions... not saying they are better... but give them a try... you may like the results. I know I am going to do a taste test with both methods!Aluminum is even worse than steel... you will metal aluminum pot like I am going to tell in you a few min!!! BAD!Lye (sodium hydroxide) [pH~12] -- this is authentic, and I really want to try a cold lye technique... it may be even betterBaking soda (sodium bicarbonate) [pH~8] -- don't even bother... they are not worth it.Baked baking soda (sodium carbonate) [pH~11]-- Take your baking soda (1/8-1/4 cup or so) and bake it on a cookie sheet for 20min... an hour... something like that. then get a pot of boiling water (I use our large spaghetti pot.. just make sure it is steel!!!). Slowly and carefully put the carbonate into the water (if it is still hot it will boil the water). Drop your pretzels in the water for about 1-2 min. Take them out, sprinkle with salt, and bake them. I have done several single blind taste tests and the sodium carbonate is always the clear winner. I am thinking the non-boiled lye may be a better lye mix. What is going on when you bake the baking soda you chemically dehydrate the baking soda, and change it from sodium bicarbonate to sodium carbonate. This greatly increase the pH. It isn't as caustic as the Lye, but it is close. So please be careful!!! and follow all the other safety measures laid out above.

    And the water is just right at boiling. I am kinda anxious to try using not hot water.My pretzel recipe was totally my (and a buddy's) creation.... and we did boiled base because that is how you do bagels.... never even occoured to me to not boil them... but I know, now that I think about it, there were several exmaples of this when o was doing my research! Good luck!

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  • tlandrum commented on trimbandit's instructable Magic Lobster Leg Meat Extraction5 months ago
    Magic Lobster Leg Meat Extraction

    is the meat cooked after the microwave? or do you then need to boil it?

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  • tlandrum commented on tlandrum's instructable Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!5 months ago
    Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!

    That is smart. I may have to try that as mine has some very large holes around the sides of my door. Thank you.

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  • tlandrum commented on tlandrum's instructable Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!5 months ago
    Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!

    Yea, that looks more right, it just looked too thin to insulate at all in one of those pics. Yeah, I loose a lot more heat that than. I have a good insulation layer over top, but there is zero insulation in the base, and it all gets sucked out quite quickly. Did you pack your bottles in a high straw insulation type cob, or just regular cob? I know mixing it with pearlite or something similar would help a lot as well, but I didn't anticipate just how much not having an insulation in the floor would matter. Wow, it really makes a big difference.I like the plastic lid idea... never heard that one. I did have a much smoother finish when I first finished it (not as nice as yours, but it didn't looks shaggy). But Oklahoma get pop up thunderstorms all the time, especially this time of year. I ...

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    Yea, that looks more right, it just looked too thin to insulate at all in one of those pics. Yeah, I loose a lot more heat that than. I have a good insulation layer over top, but there is zero insulation in the base, and it all gets sucked out quite quickly. Did you pack your bottles in a high straw insulation type cob, or just regular cob? I know mixing it with pearlite or something similar would help a lot as well, but I didn't anticipate just how much not having an insulation in the floor would matter. Wow, it really makes a big difference.I like the plastic lid idea... never heard that one. I did have a much smoother finish when I first finished it (not as nice as yours, but it didn't looks shaggy). But Oklahoma get pop up thunderstorms all the time, especially this time of year. I had left the top off and it all washed away. I re-insulated it, but have just never redone the finish layer. Maybe I'll do that sometime. But it pretty well stays under the tarp all the time (too many waking up at 2AM running out in the rain to cover it up! 2-3 times of that and you just leave the tarp on!) Thanks for the input... one of the best things I have found about writing an instructable is that other people teach me more about my project that I didn't know! And really, beautiful oven.

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  • tlandrum's instructable Tools for Better Bread's weekly stats: 5 months ago
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  • tlandrum commented on tlandrum's instructable Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!5 months ago
    Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!

    Good! I really liked the saplings to make the form. It worked really well for what I wanted to do, and it sounds like it would work for you as well. Really the only down side for me has been the rain. The tarp works OK, but if you can get a piece of sheet metal to make a shed over the top it would be better. It really didn't take me all that long. Certainly to the point that if I had to tear it down and start over again I would not cry too long! It's work, but it is fun. Good luck, post some pics back here if you make one... would love to see it.

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  • tlandrum commented on tlandrum's instructable Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!5 months ago
    Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!

    Thank you... I didn't know that (Wattle & Daub).Cob took me a while to understand what exactly it was, my mind kept going to adobe. Here is the difference (in case someone out there does not get it)Cob you take the cob (straw, clay and sand) and build a structure.Adobe you take cob and form it into bricks, you then use the bricks to build a structure.

    beautiful. I assume you used a sand mound for the form? The walls look quite thin? How thick are they? (Any issues with heat loss. Or just keep a fire burning and you are good?)And here is the big question.... what did you use for the final cover? I tried just leaving mine exposed, and it became quite clear that it would not take too many rains to totally wash it out. Just one of the reasons I haven't really even tried to place a finishing pretty layer.... it just washes away anyway. I know cob can be quite resilient, but the rain really is my issue. Fired brick, metal roof, lime treatment, and I'm not sure what else all just didn't seem to fit what I was wanting. Yours looks to be raw cob exposed to the elements? Other than moving to the desert, how have you protected it?

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  • tlandrum commented on tlandrum's instructable Easy No Kneed Bread5 months ago
    Easy No Kneed Bread

    Yes, it would.... never tried it for that, but I'm sure it would.

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  • tlandrum commented on tlandrum's instructable Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!5 months ago
    Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!

    No, there is no vent. While I have used this for 2-3 years now, and continues to use it, it really is designed as mor of a temporary oven. At l sat that is how it started, so there is a lot of things that I wish it had. One of these days, after we move in a few years, I will make a larger and better one, and I really like your barrel idea... I will remember that. Thanks.

    I got old 1x12 and cut it to the rough shape of the hole. Just make sure you soak it before you put it in the door! Thanks for the comment, there are plenty of improvements you can make on this design if you want to make a lasting high quality oven. But to spite the limitations I imposed with the design and raw materials it has served me well for 2-3 years now, and I look forward to using it every time.

    Thank you, it was a lot of fun.

    Yep, sure did. And read his and a lot of other books on it. That is the beauty of working with cob. You can build as complex or simple a design as you like. This is kinda an odd mixture of starting off as something that was going to a test of design, but then converting it to a more long term oven. And then there was the whole idea of building it with materials sourced in my little back yard.Got some pics of yours? Would love to see it.

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  • tlandrum entered Tools for Better Bread in the Bread Challenge 2017 contest 5 months ago
  • tlandrum's instructable Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!'s weekly stats: 5 months ago
    • Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!
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  • tlandrum commented on tlandrum's instructable Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!5 months ago
    Cob Bread Oven, Back Yard Sourced!

    Yes and no. The whole point in this type of oven is that the baking is because of the heat that is radiated from the walls. The fire will impart the heat into the walls, and to survive it needs a good air flow. A chimney can help with this air circulation, but with my style it is small enough that you should have plenty. But he 62% door to dome ratio will help with this a lot.

    I like it... it is as good a theory as anything I have read... and clearly better than "it makes carbon fiber that is stronger that steel!" And it clearly does something... they have been doing it since biblical times!!! (the old parts at that!)

    Working on it... almost ready. ;)

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  • tlandrum entered Easy No Kneed Bread in the Bread Challenge 2017 contest 5 months ago
  • tlandrum commented on tlandrum's instructable Cob Bread Oven, back yard sourced!5 months ago
    Cob Bread Oven, back yard sourced!

    I totally agree on the chimney. A chimney would very much help with the ventilation. But this is a small enough oven that it is not much of an issue. And it does not show it really well, but the leaf blower is kinda hitting it on the side, that way it blows around the oven, not directly into the mouth of it.

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