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  • tmspro commented on mikeasaurus's instructable 5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw9 months ago
    5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw

    Great tips. I'll have to try the drill the next time.A couple of things I try: vice-grip pliers locked on the screwdriver shaft lets you put a lot of downward pressure on the screw, and still turn the screwdriver. As well, vice grips on protruding screw-heads work great. If it can grab the screw head, provides a very tight lock, and, if applied sideways, gives you extra leverage.

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  • How to Use Railroad Ties to Decorate Your Home

    I like the idea of re-using what is often perceived as a waste resource. Many of the ideas in this Instructable are good, and include several I have not seen before.Please note you should never use old railway ties for, or near, gardens where food is grown, or for building animal feed structures. Creosote, the preservative applied to railway ties, is toxic. Old ties can still leech unsafe levels of creosote into the soil, where nearby plants will take it up. Animal feed stored near ties will also take up leeched creosote.As creosote is toxic, probably not a good idea to use for seating, or for play structures.Finally, ensure you have permission before collecting "abandoned" railway ties. North American railroads sell those ties to third-parties, who in turn sell the ties. E...

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    I like the idea of re-using what is often perceived as a waste resource. Many of the ideas in this Instructable are good, and include several I have not seen before.Please note you should never use old railway ties for, or near, gardens where food is grown, or for building animal feed structures. Creosote, the preservative applied to railway ties, is toxic. Old ties can still leech unsafe levels of creosote into the soil, where nearby plants will take it up. Animal feed stored near ties will also take up leeched creosote.As creosote is toxic, probably not a good idea to use for seating, or for play structures.Finally, ensure you have permission before collecting "abandoned" railway ties. North American railroads sell those ties to third-parties, who in turn sell the ties. Even badly damaged ties have commercial value.

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  • Deck of Cards in a Bottle (It's a puzzle!)

    Thanks for the instructable. It's an interesting and enjoyable change of pace from what I usually see here, and a wonderful challenge. For those struggling with this: I thought, unless there is a glaring error of fact, or a blatant safety concern, if an instructable did not appeal to me, for whatever reason, I should just move on, no comment required. Many instructables assume skill sets, tools, facilities, training or interests I do not have. Despite that, I find some of these are still worth reading.

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  • tmspro commented on Elias Stratakos's instructable Wall Tool Holders1 year ago
    Wall Tool Holders

    The racks are very well thought out and executed, and look great. Fantastic instructable - I cannot imagine how much work went into it, but I am very impressed with all the 3D imagery matched to the video.How do you keep your work area so neat and tidy?

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  • tmspro commented on Herbsco's instructable $100 City Proof Garden 1 year ago
    $100 City Proof Garden

    impied: i've had a lot of success stopping cats from using the garden bed as a litter box by inserting skewers, twigs or plastic forks (pointy side up) every 8 or so inches in a grid pattern. I prefer the skewers or twigs as they blend in better.

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  • Hand Crank Generator / Battery Charger

    Shiseiji - more of a suggestion/query than anything else. The hand crank looked to be ideal for what John wants to do, but, I haven't bought any military surplus for at least 40 years (no need or interest), so not up on current prices. One more option: long ago, non-functioning military/government equipment could be purchased for a bit more than scrap value. If that is still possible where you live, and if the crank mechanism is good, should be possible to cobble up some brackets and replace a non-functioning military generator with one from a car.

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