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  • tonep commented on abzza's instructable Tales From the Chip: LM386 Audio Amplifier1 week ago
    Tales From the Chip: LM386 Audio Amplifier

    Nicely done. Just the right amount of theory to get going with the practical. In case you are interested, I have a tiny little pcb for this IC amplifier (with no etching required) here: https://www.instructables.com/id/Compact-Circuit-Boards-with-Eagle-No-Etching/. It will take up to 470uF capacitor in the speker output quite confortably. For the 1000uF in your schematic, some adjustment may be needed.

    Just google "audio schematics" or "amplifier schematics" or "ic amplifier schematics". You will find enough stuff to keep you going for quite a while. In my experience, the more fun way is to learn by doing.

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  • Compact Circuit Boards With Eagle ... No Etching!

    Thanks very much. As you must already know, making a tutorial takes quite a bit of effort. A little appreciation goes a long way

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier1 week ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Glad to be of help!

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier2 weeks ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    If you want to confim if the power supply is the actual cause of the distortion, try running your amplifier on a 12V battery e.g. car battery. Just take care that you have the polarity right. The extra diode I mentioned under "Troubleshooting" will help protect the module from inadvertent reverse polarity.If the distortion is considerably reduced when using the battery, then there may be a problem with your power supply filtering or regulation. In this case just post a schematic of your power supply, if you have it or a picture of the lable if it is a wallwart and I will see if there is anything you can do to improve it.If there is no change in the distortion on battery power, then the problem may be that the input drive level is too high. If you can't reduce the input level, ...

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    If you want to confim if the power supply is the actual cause of the distortion, try running your amplifier on a 12V battery e.g. car battery. Just take care that you have the polarity right. The extra diode I mentioned under "Troubleshooting" will help protect the module from inadvertent reverse polarity.If the distortion is considerably reduced when using the battery, then there may be a problem with your power supply filtering or regulation. In this case just post a schematic of your power supply, if you have it or a picture of the lable if it is a wallwart and I will see if there is anything you can do to improve it.If there is no change in the distortion on battery power, then the problem may be that the input drive level is too high. If you can't reduce the input level, try using a series resistor in each input. It will go between each input capacitor and the corresponding terminal on the input socket. Experiment with values between 10K and 47K to get the lowest distortion with the minimum loss in volume.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier2 weeks ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Nice work! Don't worry too much about the speaker. According to the specs (attached in my instructable - the relevant extract is attached in my reply to adhith94 below), the amplifier can take speakers of 4 to 8 Ohms impedance. The lower the impedance the higher the output power. Output power is also controlled by the supply voltage, but according to the specs, the highest voltage the amplifier module can take is 16V DC.Your speaker wattage is also not an issue. 20W means that it is well within the output range of the amplifier. In other words, your speakers will not be damaged at max volume.Thanks for mentioning the decoupling capacitor. You will need one depending on how well your power supply is regulated and also the length of the connecting cable between power supply and amplifier.

    Hi Karan. There is nothing much really that can go wrong. For the basic circuit, there are just three connections for the input circuit, four connections for the output and two for the power supply. Please post a picture showing the wires from the amplifier board to (1) the speaker terminals, (2) the audio source (3) the power supply terminals. This will help me find out where you are going wrong.Also, I suggest reading and following the troubleshooting section in my instructable. I'm sure you will find it useful.

    Thanks craige!

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier4 weeks ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    For some reason I am unable to enlarge your image to check out the specs of your power adaptor, but if the rating is 11.5V and 1.6A DC, you should have no problem using it. Just be sure that when you are wiring the DC socket on the amplifier, you connect +ve and -ve wires with exactly the same polarity as shown on the label of your adaptor.

    The first thing you do is make sure you have the power supply polarity correct. If you got that wrong, then I'm not sure your amplifier module survived the reverse polarity. I never tried that!If you got the power supply polarity right and there is still no sound, disconnect all the connections from the module. Only connect two individual speakers to the speaker connections. Then connect the power supply. Now when you touch the the two inputs with your finger, you should get sound in one of your speakers, depending on whether you touched the left or right channel input.With this minimum connection, if your polarity is correct and you still get no sound when you touch the input terminals, then it is possible that the amplifier module is damaged, possibly by reversed power supply polarity...

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    The first thing you do is make sure you have the power supply polarity correct. If you got that wrong, then I'm not sure your amplifier module survived the reverse polarity. I never tried that!If you got the power supply polarity right and there is still no sound, disconnect all the connections from the module. Only connect two individual speakers to the speaker connections. Then connect the power supply. Now when you touch the the two inputs with your finger, you should get sound in one of your speakers, depending on whether you touched the left or right channel input.With this minimum connection, if your polarity is correct and you still get no sound when you touch the input terminals, then it is possible that the amplifier module is damaged, possibly by reversed power supply polarity or a short circuit while you were wiring up.Once you have the minimum connection working, you can proceed with making the remaining connections one by one, testing at each stage that the section you have completed is working.Good luck!

    According to the spec sheet that I have attached in my instructable, the amplifier module can take a supply voltage from 7V to 15V, so the 13V, which I am assuming is the measured voltage of your adaptor, should not be a problem.

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  • tonep made the instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier5 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    I haven't tried it, but according to the datasheet (page 4, attached here), the specs for Po show that with a 12V power supply, using 4 Ohm speakers, the PAM8610 is able to deliver 15W Continuous Output Power. It will therefore have no problem driving 10W speakers, but if you are using 4 Ohm speakers, a heatsink is essential.I use 6 Ohm speakers that came from an old mini-hifi system. I don't use a heatsink and I have no overheating problem.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier6 months ago
    Anyone Can Make This 10W+10W Amplifier

    Since this is a Class D amplifier, it hardly produces any heat in operation. The reason is that the output transistors switch at a high speed from saturation to cutoff and never remain in the linear operating region as Class AB amplifiers do. I operate my unit at medium volume over long periods and there is hardly any heat generated.Please read the section on Power and Heat Dissipation in the specs for the PAM8610 linked above.Whether you decide on the module with the heatsink or not will depend on your usage. If you are going to be using your amplifier continuously at maximum volume at the higher end of the specs, I guess it would be best to go for the module with the heat sink.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier8 months ago
    Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier

    Hi Kasun. Thanks for your interest. Regarding your question about the power supply, one of the very basic requirements for reproducing sound accurately is ensuring that you are not introducing noise or external sounds to your original signal. A noisy, unfiltered power supply will do just this. If you look at any high quality hi-fi design project, you will find that as much attention is given to the power supply as to the main amp and pre-amp. It's easy to make a good filtered 12V power supply. All you need is a 12V transformer a bridge rectifier and a filter capacitor (2200 uF/25V - 2pcs in parallel for better filtering), or you could use one of the readily available switch mode power supplies, well filtered, small compact and light.As for the bass output for this little amplifier, you ...

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    Hi Kasun. Thanks for your interest. Regarding your question about the power supply, one of the very basic requirements for reproducing sound accurately is ensuring that you are not introducing noise or external sounds to your original signal. A noisy, unfiltered power supply will do just this. If you look at any high quality hi-fi design project, you will find that as much attention is given to the power supply as to the main amp and pre-amp. It's easy to make a good filtered 12V power supply. All you need is a 12V transformer a bridge rectifier and a filter capacitor (2200 uF/25V - 2pcs in parallel for better filtering), or you could use one of the readily available switch mode power supplies, well filtered, small compact and light.As for the bass output for this little amplifier, you will be surprised how much power it can output with medium sized speakers.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier9 months ago
    Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier

    Hi Greg. Sorry for the late reply. The two capacitors connect the two channels (stereo) of your source (e.g. MP3 player etc.) to the power amp. Another of their functions is blocking any DC appearing at the input.You can use a 12V DC wallwart. Just make sure it is capable of providing at least 1.5A current. 2A would be better. An old (discarded) 12V laptop power supply will be perfect. Just be sure to wire the DC jack polarity correctly.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier1 year ago
    Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier

    Thanks! I couldn't ask for a better explanation. This is what I love about electronics, no matter how many years you work at it, there's always something new to learn.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier1 year ago
    Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier

    Thanks jhsa and thanks for the tip. A mosfet will provide the best low voltage drop solution. In this case, the selected mosfet should be able to handle current required by amplifier module at maximum volume as well as the reverse 12V, if accidentally applied.

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  • tonep commented on tonep's instructable Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier1 year ago
    Anyone can make this 10W+10W amplifier

    Hi. Thanks.The two caps are not for the speaker output. They are for the audio input. They are connected to the PCB via the volume control. If you zoom in to the PCB you will see that they go to the connections R_IN and L_IN.

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