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  • treysis commented on bobyong808's instructable Phone GPS Repair2 months ago
    Phone GPS Repair

    No, you are absolutely correct. The connectors "repaired" in this guide here are actually for the 4G antenna. Probably moving of contacts and retightening of the screws is all that was necessary.

    The GPS antenna connections are actually on the opposite site. The connectors in this guide are really for the 4G antenna. Try fixing the connection on the other site and it might work.

    That's actually the 4G antenna that you're fixing!GPS antenna connections are on the opposite site! However, opening, closing, and tightening of the screws still was enough for a good result.The problem is: somebody came up with this fix and telling everyone that this would be the connection of the GPS antenna, which is simply wrong. But now everyone has made a guide and tells everyone about the wrong connectors.

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  • How-to make your own Ethernet "splitter"

    Well, I see what you did, but the original wiring diagram is there for a reason. While the cable is SIMPLY transmitting the signal, it is NOT A SIMPLE cable! Ethernet-cables are twisted-pair-cables. That means, the wires inside the cable are twisted in pairs. This is important to minimize crosstalk between the cables (interference so to say). So the pairs in an Ethernet cable are as follows:1&2, 3&6, 4&5, 7&8The first socket should be using the original wiring of 1&2, 3&6. So the data runs completely through 2 twisted pairs. The other socket should follow the pairing-structure. So from the second port, the 1&2 should go to one twisted pair, and the 3&6 should also go to one twisted pair. As you can see, you have 4&5 and 7&8 left. Therefor you shou...

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    Well, I see what you did, but the original wiring diagram is there for a reason. While the cable is SIMPLY transmitting the signal, it is NOT A SIMPLE cable! Ethernet-cables are twisted-pair-cables. That means, the wires inside the cable are twisted in pairs. This is important to minimize crosstalk between the cables (interference so to say). So the pairs in an Ethernet cable are as follows:1&2, 3&6, 4&5, 7&8The first socket should be using the original wiring of 1&2, 3&6. So the data runs completely through 2 twisted pairs. The other socket should follow the pairing-structure. So from the second port, the 1&2 should go to one twisted pair, and the 3&6 should also go to one twisted pair. As you can see, you have 4&5 and 7&8 left. Therefor you should now connect (from the 2nd socket) 1&2 to 4&5 and 3&6 to 7&8. You could also mix it up totally, e.g. like this:1st socket: 1&2 to 4&5, 3&6 to 3&62nd socket: 1&2 to 7&8, 3&6 to 1&2It is only important that pairs are again transmitted through pairs. Otherwise you might severely compromise the speed/reliability of your connection.I hope my explanations were ok. Otherwise, please ask.

    PS: Why the ethernet standard used such a confusing wiring from the beginning (i.e. not aligning the pairs 1&2, 3&4, 5&6, 7&8) is beyond me...

    Yes. It works. I have done exactly that 10+ years ago because I couldn't run a 2nd cat5 cable through the tubes (filled with telephone cables already). Make sure you follow the right paring: pairs should end on 1&2 and 3&6 on the wall socket. You will be limited to FastEthernet (100 MBit) though.

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