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  • 6 Uses for Hair Ties (or Rubber Bands)

    SPORTS WATCH STRAP BAND: The little strap band on my plastic 'sports' watches ALWAYS wears out/breaks - often 6 mos. to a year, before the life of the watch is over. One day I asked my wife did she have anything she could think of that might substitute. Black hair ties have proven to last at least 2x as long as the plastic strap bands. I only had one to wear out (lost its stretch); the few others, must have slid off the watch. (maybe once in 6 months or so). If you look closely, it looks a bit funky, but it actually blends pretty well. No one has ever stopped me (and my family & friends WOULD!) and indicated they noticed.

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  • webpuddin made the instructable 9 Easy Ways to Distress Wood3 months ago
    9 Easy Ways to Distress Wood

    I distressed a new white oak hardwood floor, but the technique was learned doing other smaller projects & works anywhere. Don't like 'fussy' floors. So I used a combination of things. 1) a chain where I beat the floor; 2) assorted hardware hit with a hammer: old hinges, bolts, screws, nails with large heads, crowbar, old butcher knife, paint can opener, screwdrivers, - anything that will scratch, cut, or dent.; 3) chisels; 4) fake wormholes - via drill bits & nails ; and 5) patches; cut hole & rough patch. For all of these I used water-based aniline stain. It was the first time I'd used this kind of 'stain'. I loved it - it dries slowly enough (5 - 10 min working time) so you can blend, puddle it, dilute it in place for less effect, blend it. And it dries fast enough that ...

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    I distressed a new white oak hardwood floor, but the technique was learned doing other smaller projects & works anywhere. Don't like 'fussy' floors. So I used a combination of things. 1) a chain where I beat the floor; 2) assorted hardware hit with a hammer: old hinges, bolts, screws, nails with large heads, crowbar, old butcher knife, paint can opener, screwdrivers, - anything that will scratch, cut, or dent.; 3) chisels; 4) fake wormholes - via drill bits & nails ; and 5) patches; cut hole & rough patch. For all of these I used water-based aniline stain. It was the first time I'd used this kind of 'stain'. I loved it - it dries slowly enough (5 - 10 min working time) so you can blend, puddle it, dilute it in place for less effect, blend it. And it dries fast enough that within an hour or less you can sand it. After distressing, I'd use a dark, concentrated color & let it dry. Then sand all (or nearly all - no need to be fussy) of it off with an orbital sander. That accented all of the dents & scratches. Then re-stain if you want an all over darker look, or use final finish when sanded as smooth as you want & is dry. The patches were inspired by reclaimed wood from old factories & barns that I'd seen patched roughly similar to this. I used a router to make a random shaped smooth bottomed hole, made some strips of wood just slightly thicker than depth of hole. Cut them out (very roughly), glued them in place with wood glue, set weight on them. Next day, sanded them flush with floor with coarse orbital sander. Then used a wood filler that was stainable to fill gap, but left it slightly lower than surface. Stained filler, let dry, then sanded all smooth & applied finish. I don't have pictures here, but I have a 7" grinder with sanding pad, & with sandpaper I can mimic circular sawmill marks on pieces of wood. I kind of did it in a place or two on this. It's fun 'cause you don't have to be so particular. One thing I learned - there is a LOT of floor, as opposed to a table top, shelf, etc. But I didn't have to do ALL of it - just in strategic places - in front of fridge, sink, stove; around dining chairs; near recliners ... and then randomly here & there. The EFFECT is there - but its not overdone. Turned our really nice. It's hard to 'mess up'! Enjoy!

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