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15 Foot Tesla Coil, 26 Foot Sparks, In His Backyard! Answered

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TheDeviant13 (author)2009-02-11

You shouldn't resist anyways it is the amps that kill you not the volts except at lower frequencies then the volts can mess up your heart beat and give you a heart attack well HAPPY COILING

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Ivraine (author)2007-11-16

Must resist stupid impulses... Ok THIS IS AWESOME!!! I'm trying to resist the urge to build one, because I know it will hurt if I get zapped. I once had a power line come down and I became a living ground/resistor when I tried to move the wires.

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user

Yes. That would hurt. But, you must remember this-Sometimes I come home from school and feel like being zapped. So I take out my Tesla Coil, and ZAP!!! It is fun. It's not dangerous. The difference between Tesla coils and power lines are that power lines are 1-15 Kv, and about 100 amps. Tesla coils are well over a million volts for the large ones, but hardly any current at all. It is current that hurts, not voltage. That is why I like to show off that I have had 1.5 million volts flowing through me and be perfectly fine.

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user

thats weird? I always thought a million volts was a million volts and 15 thousand was less. I don't entirely understand this amp thing a voltage is a voltage whats the difference?

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user

Yes. A million volts is a million volts and 15000 volts is less than 1 million.

This is a scenario: If you had a zero resistance circuit (you don't need to worry about that), the wattage would be constant until you got to a 'load'. In this case, our load will be a light bulb. The light bulb turns some of the electrical energy into light. Therefore, the wattage must drop. But, the voltage doesn't drop. The current drops. You calculate wattage with V * I = W, V being voltage, I being current, and W being wattage. Therefore, the wattage goes down, too. Voltage is the force that electricity that has to go through things. Current is the amount of energy that can be transferred from an electrical source. Wattage is the total energy, thus both combined. This means that in a zero resistance circuit, wattage will remain constant if not interfered by a load. A tesla coil is basically just a transformer, and a superconducting transformer has a constant wattage on both ends. This means that if the wattage stays the same, and the voltage goes up, the current has to go down to hold the wattage.

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user

ok thanks I'll read that in more detail later thanks.

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user

Yes. It is kind of confusing at first.

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Sedgewick17 (author)2007-11-12

I can smell the ozone from here.

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Goodhart (author)Sedgewick172007-11-12

Yowl, the sound brings back bad memories....my right arm started to twitch so badly I had to turn the sound down *sigh*

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NachoMahma (author)Goodhart2007-11-12

. Once bitten, twice shy. ;)

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Goodhart (author)NachoMahma2007-11-12

bitten, burned....yeah you would think......but sometimes we just have to "try it another way" LOL

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Sedgewick17 (author)Goodhart2007-11-12

I have been wanting to build a large tesla coil,but the high voltage makes me shrink from the idea.

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Goodhart (author)Sedgewick172007-11-12

Well, I have felt the bite of 2 220 lines (laid my right arm across this when in my teens) which left some burns on my forearm. All the HV shocks I got were just "disturbing" but not so damaging (twice from 2 different automobile coils, once from a 10,000 Vdc power supply, and once shorted an electric fence to ground in my wet and bare feet....and after all that, I got into electronics as a hobby.....I must have been mad LOL).

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Lftndbt (author)Goodhart2007-11-12

I hear you on the auto mobile... Grabbed a split lead while the car was running. And yes I would also describe that as "disturbing". :P

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Goodhart (author)Lftndbt2007-11-12

Well, my first time, I had removed one of the plug wires from the top of a plug and asked my brother to turn the engine over while I held it close to the frame making sure I was getting spark since the car wouldn't start. Bare armed, I am leaning on the chrome bumper of the care and I got the wire a little too far away from the frame so I became a closer better ground. It felt like someone hit my thumb about 15 times with a sledge hammer. The other time wasn't much brighter. I had the coil in my work area, and had hooked up a low voltage/low amperage power supply to it, trying to get it to spaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrk arrrgh. LOL Coil rating: 80,000 volts. Why oh why couldn't I have taken up a safer hobby......like pyrotechnics or something LOL

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killerjackalope (author)Goodhart2008-05-15

Don't bet on that, being blown up is on the same par, I grabbed the bulb out of the oustide light, on the one circuit that had bulbs and high amperage breakers... in one hand out the other, my brother heard the yeeeeeooooooowww and rather than turn the switch off he went to get my mum in a calm and slow manner... I think you heard this story before...

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Goodhart (author)killerjackalope2008-05-15

Why oh why couldn't I have taken up a safer hobby......like pyrotechnics or something LOL

hyperbole: a figure of speech using a deliberate exaggeration..... ;-)
I was being mildly sarcastic to myself (because I have wonder that to myself many times.....someone deathly afraid of getting shocked.....takes up electronics for a hobby. Next I will by Base jumping (I have a fear of heights too)

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Goodhart (author)Goodhart2008-05-15

not wonder.......wondered sigh

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killerjackalope (author)Goodhart2008-05-15

Oh I know, but having been shocked and blown up I'd still rather be blown up...

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Goodhart (author)killerjackalope2008-05-15

I was really "up close and personal-like" with one small contained explosion (that I mentioned back shortly after joining) makes me want to avoid both...but I know what you mean.....I do not like being shocked (and guess who seems to be Electroman in the winter time

:-)

I know I mentioned that before...that I am a walking capacitor....even now, as spring wafts in the humidity, I get electrocuted exiting the car sometimes....I HATE it.

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killerjackalope (author)Goodhart2008-05-15

it's so annoying, just being shocked all the time... I'm trying to figure out how my hair has been burnt again... i really have no clue, any guesses?

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Goodhart (author)killerjackalope2008-05-15

None. But I smell burnt hair or skin in places I know there is no fire, here the last few years......maybe I am getting ready to spontaneously combust ?

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killerjackalope (author)Goodhart2008-05-16

I reckon so, if you do start spontaneously combusting, walk to your nearest gas station, just to make sure you know you're on fire...

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user

or run somewhere with cameras, to prove shc is real.

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user

hmm indeed, actually stations have CCTV over all teh pumps to catch gulp nd goers...

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user

I like the feel of electricity! Maybe it's because I get shocked all the time with my Tesla coil, but I have made an electric chair sort of device which just has handles with 240 flowing across them. Maybe it's just me, but I do my homework on it! I am able to do this because I have current limiting on it, so it is not dangerous.

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user

Just watch out for small bruns you can't see happening, you could have tissue damage without realising, though you're probably safe if the currents's low...

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user

Last time I checked, they were both around 0-10 microamps.

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user

Oh well within the margins of safety then...

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I know. I am a little crazy, but I like to educate people about coiling.

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user

Hehe... I guess I was a little put off by having a full 13amp circuit at 240V running straight through me... Changing outdoors lighting...

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user

wow, someone is accident prone lol

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Someone's brother hit the wrong switch... Ugh it was saturday as well, I was out that night and it was like I was on crack...

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Goodhart (author)killerjackalope2008-05-16

I can see it now, I would be entering a restaurant and the lady at the greeter's desk would shout: Oh no, you can't smoke in here !!!

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Sedgewick17 (author)Lftndbt2007-11-13

I have heard of people wiring a spark plug to two exposed wires in a car seat for a joke

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gyromild (author)Goodhart2007-11-12

I've only felt the bite of a 9v energizer on my tongue, thats probably it.
After all that, it's amazing that you're still here dude : D

Well, what doesn't kill you, makes you stronger..
A few more high voltage shocks, you'd probably be immune :P

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Goodhart (author)gyromild2007-11-12

Well, I think it turned me into a human capacitor at times. I get static shocks ALL the time (unless I wear my leather bottom shoes, that seems to drain off the potential I build up). You would think I would get used to them, but I simply HATE getting shocked.

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killerjackalope (author)Goodhart2008-05-15

A good way to stop being static is to put a screw through your shoe from the inside and file the bottom end off, it'll usually help quite alot... Everything shocks me, even the scale on my till at work...

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user

You guys should all build your own Tesla coils. 1.5 million volts won't hurt you. Current will. That's why I built a Tesla coil and zap myself weekly! You should see people stare at me when they see giant sparks hitting me.

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Errr I have no problems being zapped, I'd kinda like a big tesla coil, however when static builds up to ridiculous levels it gets annoying...

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besides, I really wouldn't mind having a big tesla in my room that basically just arced around alot and scared neighbours...

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Sedgewick17 (author)Goodhart2007-11-13

I know the fealing of 220 volts across the fingers,but I would say the worst zap I have ever got was forom a five mile elecric fence zaper.I did not know it was on and grabed both leads withe my hands.It felt like my hand was in a blender!

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Goodhart (author)Sedgewick172007-11-13

Yeah, the time I tried to free a soaking we bicycle from a fence (and I was soaking wet and barefooted too) was probably comparable. I know "how" you felt :-)

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puffyfluff (author)Sedgewick172008-06-09

Sadly, everyone is mislead that voltage will kill you. 1.5 million volts flows through me a lot. It's fun! It is current that will hurt you, and a Tesla coil makes sure that its current is almost nothing.

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TeacherOfTheWays (author)2007-11-12

Wow talk about dangerous!

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Sadly, everyone is mislead that voltage will kill you. 1.5 million volts flows through me a lot. It's fun! It is current that will hurt you, and a Tesla coil makes sure that its current is almost nothing.

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gmoon (author)puffyfluff2008-06-09

Lets stop perpetuating the myth that it's only current that kills. The fact is, it's both.

Without enough volts to drive the current through your body and overcome skin resistance, a massive, low-voltage current source won't hurt you (although a short could cause a burn.)

It's easy to demonstrate this: take an AA battery, and touch each terminal end with your index fingers. Do you survive? Yes.

Yet a fresh alkaline AA is capable of supplying one amp of current for about 3/4 of an hour. That's at least 20 times as much current potential as is commonly cited as the fatal amount.

Of course, you don't draw 1 amp because the voltage isn't high enough to push it through you. So voltage does indeed matter to safely.

(This PDF of AA battery specs has as discharge characteristics chart that illustrates the current potential.)

OK, I've had my cranky moment of the day...

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puffyfluff (author)gmoon2008-06-09

Well, you are right. Power actually really has the key here. If you had 2220 watts (My TC), and it was running on 1.5 mV, the current is 1.48 microamps. Multiply the current by two, and suddenly you have 4440 watts! That's only 2.96 microamps! So, therefore, it is not voltage or current that will kill you, it is power.

Also note that when you say "you don't draw 1 amp because the voltage isn't high enough to push it through you", you are saying that there is electricity flowing through you. That is why you can't feel it.

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