[SOLVED] How do I crimp RS Banana Plugs

I bought a set of Radio Shack Crimp-On Banana Plugs, but can't figure out how they crimp... they seem to be pretty thick brass... has anyone used these? if so, how do I crimp them?

Posted by gschoppe 10 years ago


Best way to crimp CAT-5e cable?

 (okay I am now having to retype this out as this stupid editor isn't working properly) I currently work at a dairy (or convenience/general store for you Americans out there) and I have been assigned the awesome job of phasing out the cash register with a fully fledged touch screen point-of sale system. This is how it goes: There is a computer 'out back' that controls the stock levels, reports and so on, and there is the touch screen system 'out front' that handles the transactions.  These two computers need to have a constant connection between each other. We were going to use Wi-Fi but we found that it's too unreliable and not very secure. SO we are using plain old Ethernet cable.  Now the problem: we have no router or switch so do I need to crimp the cable as a patch or crossover cable? And if someone could point me in the right direction to do this, that would be much appreciated (as everything I've looked at tells me something different every time). Cheers! (P.S I know CAT-6 is faster and more reliable, but I'm just using what my boss ordered)

Posted by asasklfjklasfkljasklfjaklfsjkl 8 years ago



Off board LED mounting. Crimps?!? Answered

Hi,I've got a project I'm working on requiring sixteen LEDs to be mounted approxomitely 60cm (23") from the main PCB. I've been looking at soldering 60cm lengths of wire onto each one and then using female headers  with a crimp on the end and then plugging them into a row of male headers. I have no crimp tool, will I need one? Is there an easier way to accomplish this? Thanks!

Asked by inbox.jason 7 years ago




How do I make a tuna lure to use when sailing across an ocean?

Most sailors who fish use a 200 pound hand-line. Making lures looks easy but I bet there are things a newbee won't understand about hooks, skirts, lures, crimps, etc.

Asked by 9 years ago



Will solder conduct electricity between two leads even if the leads are not touching? Answered

I recently moved from a prototype to soldering the components. This is a very compact application, and I'm thinking some of the leads are not actually touching (which is why it isn't working), but the solder still provided a strong bond. Should the leads always be touching in order to eliminate a poor (or no) connection? Also, would it be poor practice to use a small snippet of 20 gauge wire as a "crimp" over two leads to ensure connectivity, or would this only complicate matters? Thanks!

Asked by giantjamsandwich 7 years ago



Connection of VERY short nichrome wire? Answered

I have a VERY short piece of 32 gauge nichrome wire that I want to connect to 2 copper wires. When testing, I have connected them like on the picture, using tweezers and a pair of pliers. But I really need to find a more professional and durable way of doing it. It's important to keep as much as "free" nichrome wire as possible in the middle. I don't want to waste all the length inside a butt crimp, or wrapped around the copper wire. Is there a tiny, minitature terminal somewhere, that only steals 1-2 mm of the nichrome wire? Or am I wishing for something impossible?

Asked by karolina81 1 year ago


Bent Bike Frame

Yeah, so, my brother bought a mid-80s Schwinn World Sport. It's a nice bike. I spent about 10 hours overhauling every piece of that bike. Unfortunately, when I got it all put back together and test rode it, the bike had a nasty pull to the right. Bent Frame. He didn't check that when he bought it (didn't know anything about it, I daresay).  Anybody know anything about repairing a bent frame? The frame's tubes don't seem to be damaged or crimped or dented.  I'm thinking of using a car jack and some straps to straighten it out. Any thoughts?

Posted by marcward86 6 years ago


Why are these brass connectors binding up? Answered

Having trouble with brass pipe connectors. I have a M+F pair of connectors I want to use to make a ~air tight connection through a thick piece of rubber.  Want to screw the parts together far enough that the hex-nut section of each part will act as a flange, and crimp the rubber in between. However, I can not get the parts to thread together far enough.  At about 1/2 the length of either, the connectors start binding up.  I can only get the two about 1/4" away from being fully seated. Why? Are pipe connectors manufactured with a slight taper to create this? Or something else? Any suggestions?

Asked by CrLz 6 years ago



Fixing a broken headphone port? (iPod touch 3g)? Answered

       I've had an ipod touch for a little over a year now and the left headphone output is no longer audible.  I believe that it is due to a loose or slightly bent contact inside of my iPod, because if i wiggle my headphone connector in the iPod's female audio jack the left side audio will turn on and off.  I have contacted Apple about the iPod (no longer under warranty) and have been told that the cases for iPod touches are crimped together, and so there is no way for them to open the iPod and replace the port.          Any suggestions as to how i could fix my problem? I've been thinking of using a dental tool to pull the contact that is causing me issues outwards, but decided i would ask around before potentially worsening my port. Thanks! -Geo 

Asked by geo526468 7 years ago


Homemade wax paper wrappings? Answered

Hello everyone! This is the first time I've used this feature on Instructables, so here goes. :) I'm trying to recreate vintage sweet wrappers for a friend who will use them in a film he's making for uni, and I wondered if I could somehow impregnate the wrappers in wax to make them "chocolate proof" so I could let a friend re-live times from long ago. :) I'd be using standard printer paper and inkjet ink, would this survive the waxing? Also how would I coat the paper in a layer of wax thin enough not to crack when the package is assembled? I was also planning on heat sealing the edges wsing a warmed metal tooling to first fold the paper into a tube, then crimp the edges. Thanks for any help :) (Sorry if this is in the wrong section, as its technically a wax and paper mess-afound i think it's closer to Art than anything else. :) )

Asked by Llamarama 6 years ago


Looking for advice on panel mount connectors (something like banana plugs)

Not sure if Tech is the right place to post but it seems appropriate. I have been doing some breadboarding lately and in an effort to clean up my work I plan on making a box/panel with several commonly used components (potentiometers, audio jacks, DC jacks, other sockets). I would like to have some sort of quick way of connecting these components to a breadboard. I saw a post here in instructables on how to make Banana plug to breadboard pin jumpers. The only problem I have with this solution is that all of the panel mount banana plug jacks I can find are fairly pricey and somewhat bulky for what I want. Does anyone know of something like a panel mount breadboard socket? The components I will be using will have anywhere from 2-9+ wires coming from them so I would like a way to have some sort of socket or connector mounted with the component and use wires to connect to the breadboard only when the component will be used (as to avoid lots of excess, unused wires coming from my panel). A source of cheap banana plug jacks (female, panel mount) and crimp on male plugs would help as well, if I cant find another option.

Posted by jdavis-9 5 years ago


any idea's on magnetic generators that would generate 34.5 watts output (3.5 volts, 7 amps) need to cut power costs.

Aluminum Base 1” long x ½” Diameter Oil Impregnated Brass Sleeve Bearing 4” long x ½” Diameter Brass Shaft 1 ¾” long x 2” Diameter Brass Rotor 0.10” thick Mica Insulation 0.005” thick Mylar Insulation 0.04” thick Copper Coated Steel Wire (228 U-shaped pieces) .032” thick Copper Coated Steel Wire (12 coils of 11 turns) 0.014” thick Insulated Copper Wire 12 Permanent Magnets ¾” long, 5/8” wide, 3/8” thick o Fe, Isotropic permanent magnet material cooled in a magnetic field, Cast 9100 TS. 450 Brin, 2.2 Peak energy product. ** **magnet specifications: Alnico 4, M-60; 12 AL, 28 Ni, 5 Co, bal Crimped Cooper clips 0.30 thick Copper Tube 2” long x 2 ½” diameters. Acrylic Ring-Dimensions 3 ¾” O.D., 2 ¼” I.D., 3/8” 0.002” thick Plastic Insulation Paper Acrylic holding shapes Acrylic dome Liquid Acrylic                                                 rough parts list Parts List (there is a list of parts suppliers in the next section):

Asked by wisteria92 8 years ago


Undercabinet LED lights from 110v source

Hello, Ever since i moved into my current home I have wanted to put in under-cabinet lights in the kitchen. Its a small kitchen but the current fluorescent lights are just not giving me the light I'd like.  Powering the LEDs is my only concern. There are two under-cabinet areas each with one type of florescent light fixture with a normal 110v power line running into each light directly from a small hole in the wall (all hidden of course under the cabinets). There is no power outlet associated with these two lights. There is one outlet along the wall but I would not like to use this if possible as it powers the kitchen appliances, and it would show the power cord from the lights (Id love for these new LEDs to remain hidden.) I understand to use a 110v source I would need a LED transformer of some kind, I have seen these for sale, but I do not have an outlet that this transformer can plug into. Like this: http://www.ledstrips8.com/20-singlechip-smd3528-waterproof-aluminum-shell-rigid-led-light-p-118.html Is there a way to connect a type of transformer to this direct 110v line? Would I splice the plug off the end of the transformer and just crimp it to the 110v source from the wall?  Like the end of this transformer: http://www.ledstrips8.com/led-power-supply-110220v-ac-to-12v-dcindoor-use-p-70.html Im currently at work but if pictures help I can upload them later. Thanks!

Posted by billium28 5 years ago


LED-shirt v2.0 on its way!

Hey Instructablonians! So after thinking about it for a while, I realized that my original Beating Heart T-shirt was a bit.... restrictive... as to what you could display on your glorious torso. As a result, I decided to embark on a journey to make a fully programmable 14X7 LED array display on a t-shit, which I call LED-shirt v2.0! Also, since I was making this portable and re-programmable, I figured that you should be able to go everywhere and still have some nerd "bling", so I included a charlieplexed LED binary clock. I drew up the schematic on eagle, routed the board, etched it, drilled it, stuffed it, programmed the binary clock, then soldered ALL of the crimp beads onto all 91 LEDs and female header (it's got to be detachable). I tried sewing some of the LEDs on via a sewing machine, but I bought the wrong thickness conductive thread, and the machine kept jamming. Then I tried by hand, and it just takes too long v_v. (I'm using Leah Buechley's method)I'm going to order the thinner thread and find someone with a sewing machine they're willing to lend me. Until then, I have this awesome blue binary clock that I can carry around with me!Oh, it's atmega168-based, runs @ 12MHz, and as of now runs off of 3 AA's, but I have plans to make it LI-ion compatible. Also, I have to thank Zach for the idea to make the 14X7 matrix - it's really a demi-charlieplexed 7x7 array.Oh, and if you were wondering, that's an aluminum rod w/ a captive ring next to the battery pack. I love lathes.-Muffin

Posted by T3h_Muffinator 10 years ago


Where to get piezo igniters?

I have several lighters that I still like, either for their design or intended purpose. But over the years some failed to produce proper sparks with the piezo. For some I could salvage replacements from cheap lighters but not so much for the longer ones - the type to get your bbq or oven going. Here the wire from the igniter is in ne long piece going all the way from the piezo, through the long neck to the flame outlet. As the wires in those piezo igniters are aluminium it is next to impossible to attach a longer wire as usually there is no room for crimped connections and the isolation is a problem too. I also have one particular lighter that uses a slightly longer and thicker piezo igniter, the common ones don't work here as they are too short. Adding more support underneath is a no go as the shorter ones have less travel when activated. Last but not least is one lighter that requires a piezo with not just the little metal cap at the end but with a full metal body for the stationary part. The lighter in question does not work with standard types even if I add a little metal strip to make proper contact. Problem is simply put that like this the standard ones arch over and no spark comes out of the wire. So big question: Is there any supplier or Ebay shop where one could actuall see the various types of piezo igniters and order them in small or single quantities? So far I already struggled to find a source for the crappy standard ones and the only one I found wanted to charge $ 2.95 US per igniter plus postage. Sounded a bit greedy to me considering I can buy a complete lighter with it for around one single buck...

Asked by Downunder35m 8 months ago



The battery on my Volvo keeps dying. How should I determine and fix the problem? Answered

I have a 1996 Volvo 850 GTL Wagon.  We drive it infrequently, averaging 2 trips per week.  If it isn't driven in 10 - 14 days, the battery will invariably be dead, and I'll need to jump start it, or charge it with a trickle charger overnight.   At first, I thought the battery was worn out even though it was wasn't quite to the end of its warranty period.  I replaced it, but this didn't solve the problem. Next, I thought our typically short trips weren't allowing the battery to fully charge, so I specifically changed my driving habits and used the trickle charger to top up the battery on a regular basis.  After doing this, the battery would measure in the 12.3 to 12.6 V range, but after two weeks without driving would be again be dead, measuring in the 11 V or lower range.  Even after needing a jump-start, the battery will start the car again after just 5 minutes of driving. I've measured the steady-state current draw from the battery after the car has been off for several minutes to several hours using both a clamp-on style ammeter ( So, I have an 11-month old battery that won't hold a charge for two weeks, and I'm fairly confident there's no abnormal current draws from the car.  Should I replace the battery again and hope for the best?  Is there any truth (and references!) to claims that a lead-acid battery once drained too low can never recover? Updated with new information for the various suggestions below: After fully charging the battery, I disconnected it for 48 hours.  It remained at 12.6 volts over the entire period, and when I reconnected it, easily started the car. I don't suspect the alternator:  When the car is running, 5-6 amps flows into the battery and the voltage on the battery is 13.6 V; and if I drive the car once or twice a week, the battery never dies.  I do suspect something with the keyless remote.  I stopped using my keyless remote years ago because I found it too bulky to carry around -- I lock and unlock the car using the key in the door.  Christy still uses her keyless remote.  Recently, she was the last one to drive the car before we went out of town for 10 days.  When we got back, I was positive the battery would be dead, but it started the car without a problem.  So, I ran the experiment of leaving the car unlocked, locked with the key, and locked with the keyless remote.  After a few days, the battery would be dead when locked with they key, but not when locked with the keyless remote or left unlocked.  Frustratingly, I've checked the current draw in all three configurations, and it's 40 mA in each case (and stays that way for several minutes).  For now, I have a solution that keeps the battery from dying if I don't regularly drive the car, but I'd still like to understand what is going on. Updated with solution 2010-09-02 At the car's next regular service, the shop recognized the problem.  On cars of this type and age, the crimp on the positive terminal can fail turning the positive wire to the battery into a resistor rather than a wire.  This is diagnosed by measuring the charging voltage on the battery and giggling the wire (it will jump around, and not remain at the required 13.8 V), and by noticing that the wire itself is hot.  Volvo recently released a fix for this, and previously the shop had to remove the entire wiring harness, at great expense, to fix it.  So, my battery was never getting fully charged, and I've selected the best answer from among the suggestions that my measured charging voltage was too low.   

Asked by ewilhelm 8 years ago