how can you screen print a belt? ?

 so i have been trying to figure out how to screen a belt, i have done it a few times and  when it is done it will just rub right off.  after i dried it, i dont have a heat gun i just a iron 

Asked by recyclebicycle 8 years ago


Pcb silkscreen? Answered

Im gonna try etching my own pcb but i want to know how to put a silkscreen on it and the mask to keep from short circuiting

Asked by hightekrednek2396 7 years ago


Can we silkscreen acrylic? Will it last?

The slikscreen will be on the top of the robot, it is just the carapace. When I talk about acrylic I mean like lexan, plexiglass, etc. I just want to silkscreen for esthetic purpose. It will be on a robot that is indoor. No rubbing, no physical contact. Thanks

Asked by robomaniac 9 years ago


NEW, UNUSED SILKSCREEN AND ACCESSORIES FOR US$20

For Sale Silkscreen 10*14 inside 1 Black and 1 White ink bottles 8 fluid oz Photo Emulsion, Screen Filler, and Drawing Fluid 4 fluid oz Squeegee All this for US$20 plus shipping

Posted by fire_drakon117 5 years ago



The Human Machine

It isn't that long ago that explaining human physics and behavior was imagined by copper etching. This picture seems funny to us now. But 100 years ago this was the way to explain the functions in the human head. I found this picture in an old book and I want to share it with you. This is nice for silkscreening or transfer print at T-shirt or any other surface. When you want High-Res 2208 × 2732 and 300 dpi let me know.

Posted by IamWe 4 years ago



What would be a good cheap alternative to screen printing Ink? Answered

Okay, so I saw this Instructable the other, day, which said that it was possible to use a water based house paint for silk screen printing, and I was curious if that would work, or if anyone had tried it to see whether it cracked easily, or lasted for a moderately long period of time. Does anyone else know of any other ink alternatives, as it seems like the ink for silk screen printing is rather expensive. Thank you for your help.

Asked by XP1 6 years ago


Can ink be used to trace a PCB for etching?

I will be making lots of PCBs. I have access to silk screen shop. I was wondering if there is a type of ink or paint i can silkscreen the traces with, rather than using positive coated boards, which cost more.

Asked by PuffMag1cDrag0n 8 years ago


Instructables T-Shirt

"These shirts are hand-made art silkscreened in Northern California on high-quality American Apparel t-shirts." how about an instructable on how these t-shirts are made? I'd love to learn how to screen print shirts that look as professional. btw - what's with the search function on this site? it doesn't exactly...function... very well, does it?

Posted by theagent 10 years ago


Screen Printing Help!

Hey everyone, I did some screen printing in school, but for some reason I don't remember the processes used, and now I want to screenprint again, and I am looking up all these ways to DIY silkscreen at home on the internet and everythings cool, but I got a question, might be stupid, but hey. Every process involves using a transparency sheet to burn you image into the screen (if you are doing photorealistic images, which I plan to...) but where can I get my image on a transparency larger than letter size? For example, I have a screen that can hole an image larger than 24 x 36, that I would like to make, huge, large prints with, but I could hardly fathom a transparency that large, or how much it would cost to have one printed...is there a website for that kind of thing? Thanks a bunch...

Posted by Molue. 10 years ago



SMD Soldering without Soldermask?

I'm working on a project and I needed to get a PCB made. I was planning on getting it from BatchPCB, but I ran into a little problem... I'm using a NAND Flash chip, which is TSSOP48; the footprint has 6mil spacing! (BatchPCB has a 8mil minimum) The next cheapest solution would be Barebones PCB, which makes prototype PCBs without soldermask & silkscreen. I'm worried about soldering on the Flash chip, and another LQFP48. Will the lack of a soldermask make it impossible to do?

Posted by zachninme 9 years ago


Printing my logo designs onto a usb flash drive any ideas?

Hi guys, I need to print some white graphics onto a flat black USB flash drive, I've included a picture.  I'd prefer to do this using a silkscreen process of some sort. Do you have any ideas about the most efficient way to get this done. I want to avoid Pad printing because of the high cost. I have 200 to print on both sides (400 prints total). Let me know what you think, thanks!

Posted by moleculeism 2 years ago


how can i be consistent in printing with rubberized innk?

I have a problem with rubberized ink.. . some tutorials say that I have to press it hard but when i do, it's like the paint is being scraped and the "shiny" effect is not achieved.. . I don't know what to do with the rubberized ink.. another thing is that, where does "bleeding" come from? I mean, what mistake can I possibly commit to see that on my shirt? is it because of not enough pressure? another thing, about the sides of the image, sometimes i do get a "scraped" line on the side of the image.. .why is that so? Can you give me some insights on what errors to prevent? thanks

Asked by 8 years ago


Does anyone need 3 coffins?

Hey y'all! I was wondering if anyone needed 3 coffins? I used them in a performance but am moving and have to get rid of them. I'd love to see them used in another project. If you can offer something, it would be wonderful to get a return on the materials cost (it was a street performance, so I didn't make any cash monies) but I will also consider trades or possibly just giving them away to someone who has an awesome idea! Things I'd like to trade for: letterpress ink or other letterpress shwag, art / craft / drawing paper, lino blocks, silkscreening stuff, other printing / book-making stuff More info and some photos here: http://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/art/3665821234.html

Posted by mbelle1 5 years ago


Instructables Build Night! 9/22

I am thrilled to announce that Instructables Build Nights have returned with a vengeance. And our amazing new friends at The reMake Lounge are going to help host them and a host of upcoming Instructables workshops.We invite one and all to come and bring whatever it is you are working on or would like to swap. If you're not working on anything there will be a YUDU (silkscreen machine) there for people to experiment with and a host of materials and tools like soldering irons and craft supplies. I will also be bringing an Arduino to play around with and would happily give anyone a crash course on how to use one for the upcoming Arduino Contest.Meet and mingle with local makers. Learn, share, explore and have fun! It will be just like the internet, but in real life! Festivities start at 5:30. The Remake Lounge is located atCrocker Galleria 50 Post St. Suite 9San Francisco, CA 94104 (Ground level near Sutter St. Entrance!)We look forward to seeing you!

Posted by randofo 8 years ago


Good kits?

Off in another thread we were talking about goodkits being a good way to get your feet wet with the practicalities of electronics: how to solder, what the individual bits look like, and so on. I was lamenting the demise of Heathkit - many a engineer in my generation had their first electronics experience putting together one of Heath's kits, using their excellent instructions.So anyway, what kits are available today that offer the hobbyist a "good" and educational building experience? The kits should have good quality PCBs and components, instructions that go far beyond "solder all the components to the board in the places indicated by the silkscreen", and hopefully some amount of theory on how the thing works, and how to troubleshoot it if it's NOT working.I'll recommend:Lady Ada's stuff - I'm not sure I'm wild about online vs printed instructions, but it certainly gives you a good chance to see what you're getting into before you order anything, and it probably permits a higher level of quality in the instructions than it would be cost-effective to have printed.2Dkits Blinkies - a more limited selection, 2dkits specializes in neat little LED badge-like things

Posted by westfw 10 years ago


Willoughby & Baltic - Boston Area Maker Community

Willoughby & BalticWe make wonderful things.Willoughby & Baltic is a community organization of people who make stuff. Among our ranks are artists, engineers, writers, teachers, and everything in-between. In fact, everyone in W&B is all of those things to some degree - and more.We exist to provide our members what they need to create. Primarily, that involves having comfortable, usable space and an extensive arsenal of tools and equipment available. But with W&B, our members also get a strong, positive community who love to learn new things, teach what they know, and provide unending creative energy. It's a group of people who can appreciate what it takes to bring a project to life, and who can bring new and unexpected perspectives to the tough problems we inevitably encounter.We are located in Somerville, MA near Davis Square and the Red Line subway stop. We are convenient to Cambridge, Boston and the greater metro area.We currently have a Hackerspace with darkroom, silkscreen studio and computer lab, a model fab for smaller projects, and a larger fabrication space with metal and woodworking tools. Please check us out at willoughbybaltic.comYou can read more at the Boston GlobeThese photos are a sample of what our full Fabrication Space near Union Square has to offer.

Posted by waaronw 9 years ago


Circuit board heat Trouble. Answered

Full disclaimer, I am still learning and at my current skill level I am essentially following a picture book showing how to hammer a nail then emulating it, Hope that analogy paints the picture correctly. Now for the problem! I have embarked on a journey of growth and learning, in said adventure I took a personal challenge of building something and hopefully learning in the process. Needless to say I did learn, some lessons more painfully than others (soldering Irons are HOT *Sigh*) but I am at an impasse. You should see attached (hopefully) one schematic and two photos. The schematic correlates to the board of course. The next two are of the silkscreen on the board (empty) and the board upon "completion". If you notice in the empty board photo I have drawn your attention to a specific area, the area in question. In this area there seems, during testing, a decent amount of heat build up. Now this may be normal, I do not know. The device calls for the use of three Protected 18650 Lithium Batteries (3.7V I believe). I attempted to do a continuity test with what I thought was under voltage, in hindsight, I'm not sure whether the power cells are in series or parallel so perhaps I was not under? anywho that is when I noticed the heat in that area. I hope I have illustrated my predicament enough for a solid enough understanding, If not I apologize. Please ask any information you require. 

Asked by Dauntless 3 years ago


Leah Buechley and Instructables Written Up by Forbes: "A Blinking Fashion Statement"

Instructables members Leah Buechley, Plusea, and enlighted got a nice mentions by Forbes in A Blinking Fashion Statement.For all their talk of breaking glass ceilings, Sarah Palin and Hillary Clinton have nothing on Leah Buechley.In the several years since she first sewed a circuit board to a T-shirt, the 31-year-old University of Colorado computer-science researcher has done a lot to bring gender equality to the world of do-it-yourself, perhaps shattering a certain silicone-based ceiling once and for all."The tinkering group has always been a boys' club," says Buechley, referring to the DIY movement's loosely formed faction of tech geeks, gear heads and circuit wizards who tinker with electronic gadgets in basements and garages across America. At the same time, she says, the arts-and-crafts contingent (think knitters, sewers and silkscreeners) has traditionally been a more feminine domain. ...True to their fashion roots, DIY wearables are not always practical. A recent tutorial on Instructables.com gives readers a step-by-step for making what the author calls a "wearable waste of energy": a sweatshirt affixed with a glowing light-emitting diode (LED)."It's not purely functional," says Syuzi Pakhchyan, author of the new book Fashioning Technology. "It's functional and aesthetic."..."Turn your favorite clothing item into a wearable waste of energy!" writes Hannah Perner-Wilson in her tutorial on Instructables.com. The project is as much a teaching tool as it is a fashion statement. Perner-Wilson takes readers step-by-step through how to use conductive fabric, pressure sensors and a vibration motor to make a final product. She also encourages fellow tech-crafters to think about making the shirt less wasteful: "Solar cells are an option," she writes.More news and press about Instructables here.

Posted by ewilhelm 9 years ago


Broken Scope Update: Transistor testing? Replace blown ones with commonly available equivalents? or BER?

So in a previous question, https://www.instructables.com/answers/My-oscilloscope-died-How/ I have stated that my oscilloscope died, and listed the symptoms. Since then, I have popped the cover off, had a look inside, and was I found inside what certainly appears like a "mod," it goes off to the 3 by 3 connector I have mentioned also. I forgot to mention a small blueish purplish wire was next to it, similarly just sticking out the scope. I figure it is a MOD because it is: A) precariously mounted to the transformer with only one small nut on the transformer B) Has so many bodge wires crawling around on it, that it looks more like a cobweb (and w/o silastic or hot glue for vibrations/stress) C) Sloppy soldering and flux residue left behind indicating hand soldering D) The PCB has a very different appearance than the rest of the boards inside; No solder mask, greyish white, and no silkscreened values, parts, or numbers. I traced both the wire and the connector and ribbon cable to the same mod board, which clearly got toasted. There was a small orange wire tangling off that board, it it broke off before I even realised it. Luckily the pictures show roughly where it was connected. Tracing the blue wire back to the board, I discovered it is connected directly to one of the cooked resistors, and I think the other cooked one was in series with it. The only connection found to the main board is the orange wire, and there are ceramic capacitors in series on that crappy looking PCB, indicating it is capacitively coupled. I was Hoping that what had happened was the blue wire came into contact something it was not supposed to, and shorted the output of that chip causing it to catastrophically fail, knocking out power to some of the boards. Unfortunately did not appear to the the case, and the supply voltages seem OK. Nothing appears obviously burned out on any of the other boards from what I can tell. However, just today I have discovered that some driver transistors, which are mounted to heat sinks, are getting unconfortably hot to touch. I suspect they may be blown, by the blackening and discoloration around them on the PCB.They themselfs do not appear to have any physical damage. I will desolder them and connect them to a transistor tester I have to see if they register as operational. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ As for some additional questions, can I replace those weird looking obscure transistors with standard ones? I am not sure of their exact specs, the only datasheets I can find for "2SA818" and "2SC1628" are some scanned PDF datasheets that are not in english, and I certainly could not find replacements online for them. I have the gut feeling radioshack is not going to carry them either. :P I hope this is not Beyond Economical Repair (BER), but used analog scopes can be bought used for around $30-$70, and of course I am on the verge of getting something better than that.

Asked by -max- 3 years ago