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A dangerous acid is in schools Answered

I would like to start a poll here.
Dihydrogen Monoxide is a dangerous acid that can kill in a multitude of simple ways. It is all over schools and I would like to know:
Do you think it should be banned?
pleases leave your comment in the appropriate area below, and at the end of the week, I'll tell you what it is. (and if you do know what it is, please don't spoil it) I would like to see your respinse before you research.

======ANSWER======

Ready?..................

IT'S WATER!
Dihydrogen mononoxide - H2O , water.

Some students at ATM University sent around a research study and a poll and around 80% of the student population voted to ban it. This is an interesting effect of how ingnorance can have a significant affect on life. Moral: DO THE RESEARCH!

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bumpus (author)2008-12-16

A friend of mine got some kind of wicked acid on her wrist a month ago, took a few layers of skin off.. :( She's fine now, but has a darker spot where it was..

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Brennn10 (author)bumpus2008-12-16

I have had that experience. I got a good amount of silver nitrate on my hand. At first it is grayish/white, then it turns to a purple, and finally it turns to black. It looked like I had a pigment disorder.

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killerjackalope (author)Brennn102008-12-26

I got attacked by something in chemistry and the discolouration to my fingernail has never left, not sure what because I spilt a fair few chemicals that day, it has faded a little now that I inspect it, though it makes the scar that runs in to my fingernail and faintly under it patently obvious...

before someone chimes in it's not from smoking, this happened before I started...

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Goodhart (author)killerjackalope2009-03-04

It may have been an alkaline. A very reactive base can cause extremely horrific damage if left unchecked. If a bit of it embedded itself in your skin or under the nail, it may take awhile to rid yourself of it. Or the nail may have to eventually grow all the way out. OR be removed if you experience any toxicity.

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lemonie (author)Goodhart2009-03-04

TFA is rather unpleasant, I shan't be spilling that on my finger again...

L

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Goodhart (author)lemonie2009-03-04

carboxylic acid sounds nasty, what were you using it for?

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lemonie (author)Goodhart2009-03-04

Trifluoroacetic is good for cracking acid-labile linkages. It's dry and soluble in organic solvents such as dichloromethane, but it's a real-pain under the fingernail.
To be really specific I was knocking things of a Wang-polystyrene

L

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Goodhart (author)lemonie2009-03-04

Ok, understood...to a point. That is chemistry a little beyond my knowledge base (although I have read a bit about peptides) :-)

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lemonie (author)Goodhart2009-03-04

It's all god fun and you earn a lot of money, but it's leading you into big pharma, or not in my case, I decided to drop-out. L

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user

I got attacked by copper in chemistry class. I washed out the little clay pot we were using, and the water came out a bit harder than I expected. Some of the copper got into my eye.

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crackinjack (author)2009-02-19

Ignorance is bliss, until that bliss is banned.

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Goodhart (author)crackinjack2009-03-04

We try to ban ignorance here, through education ;-)

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Goodhart (author)2008-12-24

it is not an acid...... written thusly, one can see this: H-OH Normally an acid starts with a hydrogen ion, as this does, but it is balanced by an alkaline ion, making pure water totally neutral in pH.

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user

Ya, I know it's neutral. But seeing as one could call it an acid as well, I decided that would be better for the confusion.

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user

No, you can't "call it an acid." It is chemically neutral (pH == 7) having an equal number of proton donors and proton recipients. Calling it an "acid" is either naïve ignorance, or deliberate (may one say "terroristic"?) fearmongering.

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PKM (author)kelseymh2009-03-04

Yeah, what lemonie said- I thought water was both an acid and a base because it contains H3O+ and OH-, and its pH is 6-(1*10-14), as is its pB or pOH or whatever it's called. That bit always made me a bit uneasy though, as I'm not sure even my A-level chemistry teacher was entirely happy with what happened to pH and pOH for water.

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lemonie (author)kelseymh2009-03-04

I may be a bit late on this but water is a Brønsted acid, which dissociates to give H+. The pKa might only be 14, so it's a very weak acid but it can still be called one. (The use of the word is deliberate)
Note that glacial acetic acid will have an equal number of proton donors and proton recipients also - this isn't a definition of a non-acid.

L

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Goodhart (author)Goodhart2008-12-24

And for those that are picky, the formula is this:

2H2O2 --> 2H2O + O2

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E-R-IC (author)2009-02-28

yea it is. dye as in two hydrogyn mon as in one oxide

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Kiteman (author)2008-12-16

Please get your terminology correct - it is Dihydrogen Monoxide ("DHMO") or oxygen dihydride.

(Did you know that it is used in the manufacture of baby formula?)

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Plasmana (author)Kiteman2008-12-26

Did you know that it is used in the manufacture of baby formula?

Yes, I know that, but why!!

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kelseymh (author)Plasmana2009-01-05

Solubility and evaporation :-)

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gimmelotsarobots (author)Kiteman2008-12-16

Sorry, sorry. I corrected it. You're right and I easily mix up my chemical formulas. (a very bad thing to do were I in the chemistry business)

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user

While we are at it, isn't your acid not really an acid in its pure liquid state? I think it does have a neutral ph indicating it is neither acid nor base.

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n8man (author)caitlinsdad2008-12-16

Yet it is a solvent to pretty much everythings

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scafool (author)2008-12-26

When I was just a baby my mother used to soak me in a tub of that stuff. She called it a bath.

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skunkbait (author)2008-12-19

Thousands of people are killed each year, when they get this stuff in their lungs! I've even hear of people putting this stuff in mixed drinks at unscrupulous bars!

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Plasmana (author)skunkbait2008-12-26

Yes, people would intake DHMO to increase their activity and strength...

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PKM (author)2008-12-16

I think you mean dihydrogen monoxide. Hydrogen dioxide doesn't exist as far as I know (unless it's a functional group for some weird organic ether-type of thing)

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whatsisface (author)PKM2008-12-16

I can't see any way that a hydrogen dioxide molecule could form, covalent is out, ionic won't work, metallic sure won't either, so you're likely right.

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whatsisface (author)NachoMahma2008-12-16

That explains my E in chemistry :-)

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whatsisface (author)whatsisface2008-12-16

Ah I see, I was thinking Hydrogen bonded to two oxygens couldn't exist, I didn't realise H2O2 counted as hydrogen dioxide too.

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Goodhart (author)whatsisface2008-12-24

it IS very unstable and breaks down, even in simple sunlight.... breaks down into water
and O2

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Lithium Rain (author)whatsisface2008-12-16

Says so on the bottle. On the brand I use anyhow. ;)

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Sorry, sorry. I corrected it. You're right and I easily mix up my chemical formulas. (a very bad thing to do were I in the chemistry business)

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Wyle_E (author)2008-12-21

I can't support any effort to ban DHMO, because I'm hooked on the stuff, and no addicted organism has ever survived withdrawal. BTW, did you know that every known mass murderer has been a user of adenosine triphosphate?

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gimmelotsarobots (author)Wyle_E2008-12-24

Wow, I would not have guessed. Ha ha.

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gimmelotsarobots (author)2008-12-22

Ready?..................

IT'S WATER!
Dihydrogen mononoxide - H2O , water.

Some students at ATM University sent around a research study and a poll and around 80% of the student population voted to ban it. This is an interesting effect of how ingnorance can have a significant affect on life. Moral: DO THE RESEARCH!

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westfw (author)2008-12-16

DHMO is not an acid. It's main use in industry is as a bulk solvent; it's very active and will dissolve an incredible number of other industrial chemicals.

There's a web page listing some of the issues at http://www.dhmo.org

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Lithium Rain (author)2008-12-16

Here's a more dangerous one-gastric acid!

Not only is it comparable in strength, but when the school is occupied, manymanymany times more stomach acid is in the school than hydrogen peroxide.

And think about the containment issues! While the peroxide comes in little bottles, thus minimizing spillage risks, the stomach holds a lot more acid. So if stomach containment is suddenly lost, all that dangerous acid is just spilled all over the floor. =O

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caitlinsdad (author)Lithium Rain2008-12-16

I think innocent bystanders should really worry about the effect of inhaling small amounts of hydrogen sulfide gas and mercaptans that escape under pressure caused by the action of said untoherefor gastric acids...

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Lithium Rain (author)caitlinsdad2008-12-16

Yes, such inhalation often causes a chain reaction, causing the loss of containment of yet other gastric acid receptacles.

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n8man (author)Lithium Rain2008-12-16

hydrogen peroxide= the chemical used to bleach hair, or was that dihydrogenperoxide.

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Lithium Rain (author)Doctor What2008-12-16

Psssst. It's called "Sardonic humor.

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Weissensteinburg (author)2008-12-16

Although...there are lots of actual dangerous chemicals in schools. My chemistry classroom last year had large bottles decently high concentrate of HCL on each of the lab tables. I was so tempted to do some of my own experiments...

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