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Accuracy Answered

I found that using a orange connector with a white rod on each end makes a very accurate bullet because of how well balanced it is and the type of spin it has when going through the air. This bullet also has a good amount of mass to do damage to what it hits but it is also small so that you can carry more. My only problem with it is that it falls out of the barrel when shooting down at some thing because it doesn't fit all the way in the barrel. If you find something more accurate that still has the same knockdown force that I like then pleas tell me. P.S. I don't want to know about the sniper bullet that someone made because I already know about it.

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user

doesnt the clip increase air resistance and slow the bullet down?

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user

A clip has nothing to do with it, the round is what I am talking about. Every round that you fire will have drag as long as there is a force to push on it being air.

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Perfect Duck (author)Pat Sowers2007-04-11

I think he's referring to the orange connector. It has a lot of surface area and low mass. A yellow rod, which is of the same lengh, would spin and travel all the same without (as much) air currents flowing all around the wide-open orange connector and causing drag. A sideways-flying rod is many many times less aerodynamic compared to a straight-facing one. I know you don't want to hear it, but 'sniper bullet' was never, ever a fitting term for what KILLERK did. The real difference is that he used stabilizer fins, which are little wings in the back of the rod that keep its course straight. Coming right off my earlier point about sideways vs straight rods, the fins drastically improve range. The most powerful K'nex projectile I've used works the same way. I used the heavier-polymer plastic tan rods that are the size of red but strong as black (most importantly, it's heavier and thus carries more inertial force). With alluminum tape and plastic fins (cut out from thick card protectors), it keeps straight and hardly loses any inertia. From 25 feet, and using my Haas Rifle (which I'll post eventually) This thing shot straight through a cardboard box, ripping apart its own fins as it traveled through. I had to replace the fins, but it's got that powerful kick you're asking for.

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Pat Sowers (author)Perfect Duck2007-04-11

I have been able to get one of the rounds that I was talking about through a box and out the other side with my handgun, but it doesn't always hit with the tip. That is also the same for using a straight rod (not always hitting with the tip). I don't know if it is possible but I want a round that can fly straight without stabilizers on it.

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Perfect Duck (author)Pat Sowers2007-04-15

Any flying object that is not stabilized will toss and turn about at random. There are two commonly employed methods of stabilization, the first I've already mentioned is with wings and fins that use the gas around the object to correct its flight path. The second is called gyroscopical stabilizing. This is why the first 'rifles' are called 'rifles' because the barrels were rifled on the inside. (a spiral cut is etched in). This spiral causes the bullet to scrape against it and it causes the bullet to spin. A bullet that is already spinning has an axis that runs straight through it, and because of its inertia and internal friction, this axis has a will to not change. It stays spinning on this axis, thus keeps straight. I have tried making odd contraptions that spin a one-shot gun around then pulls the firing pin once it gets fast enough. The concept was that a spinning gun shoots a spinning bullet. The problem was that it shook too violently for the spin to really do much, as it still ended up firing a less-than stable rod. I was planning on trying a wheel pressed directly up against the rod that was about to be fired, but haven't tested this concept yet.

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Pat Sowers (author)Perfect Duck2007-04-16

If you take a threaded tap to cut the groves than i might spin better. (You might need a bullet that is a bit thicker so that there is less free space in the barrel)

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Pat Sowers (author)Pat Sowers2007-04-16

Something softer on the outside so that it catches in the groves.

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Perfect Duck (author)Pat Sowers2007-04-16

Rifling the barrels is not for K'nex.

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Perfect Duck (author)Pat Sowers2007-04-17

K'nex rods are plastic. Plus they're not that good of a texture along their lengh for it. Even if they started to spin in the air, they would not spin long. Not heavy enough or smooth enough for gyroscopical stabilizing to be effective.

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Mepain (author)Perfect Duck2007-04-29

Then here's an idea - try turning the fins of a "sniper rod" to make a twisting effect on the rod. Then it would have distance and it would spin. The only problem that I could think of is that the fins might need to be sretched over most of the length of the rod

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Cagedconner (author)Mepain2007-05-05

I tried a "sniper rod" using that design, though it did increase accuracy by a very minuscule amount it drastically increased the drag, and it actually lost a good 25-35 feet of range. It spun a lot though :)

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