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Can someone make an instructable on how to convert a road bike to a fixed gear? Answered

I want to convert a bike from road bike, to a fixed gear. If someone could help me out on where to start it would be great.

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user
sfred (author)2010-07-14

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixed-conversion.html#freewheelhub this is a good website this is only the hubs but there is much more

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user
Wasagi (author)2010-04-21

 This brought a make podcast I'd seen a few years ago to mind. Hope this helps! 

Link

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Corvidae (author)2010-03-18

You will want to make a single speed and not a fixed gear. With a road bike you have to use a chain tensioner because you dont have horizontal dropouts or track ends. These tensioners cant take the stress of a braking really hard with a fixed gear (read: trying to pedal backwards while moving forwards). A single speed is a normal free hub with a single sproket on it. There are a number of conversion kits out that are pretty simple. I think Surly makes one. You just take your cassett off and put a single sprocket with spacers on in its place so that it lines up with the chain ring you want to use. You can then take off your front group and replace it with a single chain ring but it would be easier to just adjust the limiting screws on the front derauiler until its stuck on the ring you want.

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cody_ledford (author)2010-03-07

White Industries makes a hub that goes in vertical dropouts.  Now almost any bike can be fixed without those hideous chain tensioners!

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duleonar (author)2010-01-22

This won't be a step by step, but I'll try to give a few pointers.

Make sure the drop outs are not the verticle ones you'd see on a modern road bike. You need to be able to adjust chain tension.

As stated before, your best bet would be to get a new rear wheel that is set up for fixie. I like the flip/flop hubs, because you can have a single speed (free-wheel) and a fixie all in the same bike. This allows you to essentially have two bikes in one.

Depending on your terrain and sanity, you may want to consider at least one brake if not two.

Other than that all I can think of is a strong fixie/singlespeed chain and chain ring. The chain rings meant for multi-geared bikes have notches designed into them that are meant to drop the chain when the derailuer beckons. A chain ring ready to drop the chain is not a very desirable feature on a fixie or singlespeed.

Hope that helped.

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lemonie (author)2010-01-06

You want to replace the rear hub with one that has a single gear and no ratchet.
Hub replacement
But it would be easier to just replace the rear wheel.
With reference to chain tension see here:
www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp

L

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Kiteman (author)2010-01-06

You are best asking this question in Ride or Burning Questions.

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