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Fake Bones And Organs For Ballistics Gel Dummy Answered

I want to make a ballistics gel dummy to test assorted weapons from video games on. Like pipe wrenches, crowbars, hammers, and kitchen knives. To do this I want realistic fake bones and organs to simulate the damage the weapons would cause to those. How would I make them?

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ThirdEarthDesign (author)2016-12-29

This frightens me a little, hopefully you are not my neighbour :-p

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user

The odds are slim. Also why?

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user

If I looked out of my window and saw a neighbour hacking away at a ballistics dummy with a pipe wrench, it's a possible cause for concern. I'd wonder if it was preparation for the apocalypse.

Recently had a contest for that here: https://www.instructables.com/contest/survivalready...

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Downunder35m (author)creepy00002016-12-30

I had a thought about the problem here and the Mythbusters always kept popping back into my mind....
For blood they used rubber hoses and ballons.
The bones for some hand dummies were made with fibreglass resin and some plastic, later they used better substitudes after making several comparison tests on "donated" cadaver bones.
If you want real organs the best replacement would be pig organs as they are the closest you will get to real human ones.
Problem is obtaining them as in most countries you will have a hard time getting a liver and brains are off the menu anyway - but they can be replaced by your favourite flavor of jello and vanilla sauce.
If the size difference is no big deal then lamb bones come close enough to human bones in terms of breaking and crushing them.
Pig, cow and other big animal bones are usually much stronger than ours when you hit them and they break in a different way.
Maybe time to watch some Maythbusters to get ideas for your dummy ;)

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user

Well, now I'm thinking about it!

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Toga_Dan (author)2016-12-31

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S...

I Googled ( tensile strength ballistic gel) got nothin much. Compressive strength, yes. And that seems to be mostly there with higher speeds (1000fps, for instance) . But a real body has tensile strength, too.

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Kiteman (author)2016-12-29

Oddly, I had this same conversation with my youngest son.

We decided that a good budget option would be broom handles, cut to length. Simple joints could be made by inserting eye-bolts into the ends of the dowels and connecting with wire or paracord.

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creepy0000 (author)Kiteman2016-12-29

To simulate bones? Wood is strong due to parallel strands of cellulose held together by a binder. Bones are strong because it's made of calcium phosphate and other minerals, and it has collagen fibers arranged length wise to make it flexible. Also I want them to look real. And what do you think I'm doing by the way? Joints? Why would a ballistics dummy need joints?

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Toga_Dan (author)creepy00002016-12-31

If you want realistic results, then, yes. Joints. How much tensile strength does gel have? Bet you could pull an "arm" right off. In the real world, that'll probably take 1000 lbs.

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I guess you want something like this then: http://ballisticsdummy.com

It's made by Shamrock Labs (though their website doesn't appear to work anymore), but they made a YouTube video, it might offer some inspiration:

If you want bones and organs but not the real thing, I'd suggest researching what's used in medicine as a substitute for bones and what's used by the military to test weaponry.

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okay thanks also right makes sense

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Kiteman (author)creepy00002016-12-30

Wood works because damage shows up as marks - it shouldn't take much work to find a thickness that is of equivalent strength to bone.

Doing? You're beating the seven kinds out of a dummy, as you said.

Joints are required because they affect the way energy is transferred around a body - a rigid structure could have shock-damage a long way from the point of impact, a joint might illustrate a whiplash effect etc.

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Toga_Dan (author)2016-12-30

iirc, poplar is a good approximation for strength of bone. A drawknife is good for roughing out a shape. Belt sander to finish. Nylon is a good sinew. If you want realistic strength and flexibility, tensile strength in joints is a must.

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caitlinsdad (author)2016-12-28

Let nature make them. Just substitute for animal parts from your butcher, farmer or supermarket.

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creepy0000 (author)caitlinsdad2016-12-29

I don't want to use real organs because smell, and the bones wouldn't be the right size if animal bones and human bones are super expensive. Like 5000$ for a whole human skeleton.

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