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"Ferropaper" created for microelectronics Answered

Researchers at Purdue have impregnated paper with iron particles, creating "ferropaper."
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Researchers at Purdue University have created a magnetic "ferropaper" that might be used to make low-cost "micromotors" for surgical instruments, tiny tweezers to study cells and miniature speakers.

The material is made by impregnating ordinary paper -- even newsprint -- with a mixture of mineral oil and "magnetic nanoparticles" of iron oxide. The nanoparticle-laden paper can then be moved using a magnetic field.

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The article later mentions that "newspaper and soft tissue paper are especially suitable." This sounds to me like a startlingly simple DIY project that could create some fun kinetic sculpture, if nothing else.

Via ScienceDaily

14 Replies

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nutsandbolts_64 (author)2010-05-10

 Impregnated with Iron particles eh? Just dissolve the Iron oxide so it'll be nano-scale then stick it in there! I can get magnetite for cheap at my hardware store, so this'll be easy enough to say you did something like that.

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fozzy13 (author)2010-01-08

Sounds like they soaked some paper in ferrofluid to me.. Who wants to be first to try it??

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dreamwaverider (author)fozzy132010-03-07

sounds like it to me too. So you make a ferrofluid or just some magnetite particles in suspension. Soak it into the paper and drive off the liquid and the magnetite will be lodged in the paper fiber. Go crazy figuring out what to do with it next.

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T3h_Muffinator (author)2010-01-11

Man..... I did this in school by accident when I convinced my chem teacher to make ferrofluid with me.

I didn't get an article, though.

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CameronSS (author)T3h_Muffinator2010-01-11

Bottom of the article says "Story Source: Adapted from materials provided by Purdue University. Original article written by Emil Venere."

A quick Google shows that Emil Venere is a "Communications/Marketing Specialist" at Purdue.

Lesson learned: if you do something cool at school, get someone in marketing to write a press release for you.

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jeff-o (author)2010-01-08

Oh, much fun could be had with this!  So, where do we get nano-particles?

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jeff-o (author)n8man2010-01-09

Well there you go.  I also learned that you really, really shouldn't inhale iron nanoparticles, and that they also cause nerve damage.

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n8man (author)jeff-o2010-01-09

 yep, and also that they are expensive, one site had them for 90 bucks a gram

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killerjackalope (author)2010-01-09

Anybody capable of making and pressing paper now could do this...

Atomised iron, mineral oil, lots of mineral oil and scrap paper, mulch and press, you could make stuff of various magnetivity.... 

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Doctor What (author)2010-01-08

Oh, very interesting indeed!

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lemonie (author)2010-01-07

According to some Instructables US bank-notes are this already, where's the novelty?

L

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n8man (author)2010-01-07

I might try that if I can get some of the nanoparticles that are required to make it. I like origami and magnets, it is perfect for me

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Goodhart (author)2010-01-07