1649Views47Replies

Author Options:

Fireball Bomb that works like an A bomb Answered

This is an improved version of lemonie's Instructable Big explosion, bang, fireball, so hoorah to him for it. But any way, my idea is that I wanted to control the exact moment it went off, so this brought me to my first idea, just put black powder and a fuse in the lid of a butane can. Well this didn't work, I just got a jet of flame, plenty cool, but no fireball or musroom cloud. I realized I lacked the essential ingrediants of compression and rapid combustion. So I made this. It's literally a firing mortar for the can, the idea is a non-explosive shell (a coffee can filled with cement with a large bean can set inside to make an orofice) filled with an explosive, with the can of butane in the middle, and a cement stepping stone on top. The idea is that the explosive, when detonated, implodes the can, thus pressurizing it, then ignites the butane, thus decompressing it, A.K.A BOOM. The stepping stone by this point would have come of, thus allowing the expanding hot gasses to disperse. For saftey, the entire contraption would be put in hole in the ground, with no green grass growing all around. The reason I haven't tested it is that I had a very close shave with the cops for the butane can incendierary grenade.
Disclaimer, I am not liable for what you do with this information, nor am I responsable for any damage to person or property, in other words, it's your problem if you kill your self.
If you haven't yet noticed why this works like an A bomb, what in tarnation are you doing on this site? But, for credebility, I'll say. The main method of detonating a fission weapon is the implosion method. Prior to detonation a nuclear weapon consists of one or more pieces of weapon-grade fissionable material which are subcritical in configuration.The implosion method is when one sphere of material is compressed (through an explosion) to make it supercritical, which leads to a chain reaction, which results in the destruction of the atom, leading too duh, a big explosion.

47 Replies

user
aweis (author)2011-05-07

indeed it is like the implosion type a-bomb i what is used in it i beleive plutonium but not shure it has been a while since i learned, but yes basic principal explosion imploding the main charge, causing an explosion, it is not the gun type bomb method originally used, for the first couple atomic boms but the more efficient way.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)themattar2009-01-16

zomg!! where'd you dig this up form?

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
NachoMahma (author)KentsOkay2009-01-16

. BTW, a BLEVE might work better and would be a LOT easier.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)NachoMahma2009-01-16

.see the publish date on this thing?

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
teddythepyro (author)2007-07-17

probably orbiting the earth or we can at least hope because that would be very very cool:)

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)teddythepyro2007-07-22

Like the Los Almos manhole cover? The US was the first to plave a man-made object in space.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
themasterpyro (author)KentsOkay2007-11-05

no your wrong there. it was the RUSSIANS who got a man made object in space first. you know? sputnik?

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)themasterpyro2007-11-06

First object in orbit was Sputnik, first object in space was a manhole cover that was used by the Los Alamos project to cover a nuke that was being tested underground. When fired the manhole cover blew off, calculations show that it is hurtling through the solar system, and I think they picked it up on radar.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
themasterpyro (author)KentsOkay2007-11-06

lol thats why the aliens arent replying. they think were all insane(and theyre right!)

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
n8man (author)themasterpyro2008-06-22

I think if their reply might be a nuke sent back. The manhole cover hit their leader's ship and it sent them plummeting into Jupiter.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
themasterpyro (author)KentsOkay2007-09-19

thanks for posting this now ive got yet another weapon in my bottomless arsenal. one thing though, if you know any iraqis DONT TELL THEM ABOUT THIS!

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)themasterpyro2007-11-06

To late, anybody with an internet connection could find this =[

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)2007-04-04

Your right aboout the development of the fireball and mushroom cloud, and also explains why the can didn't do what I wanted it to do (it was still fricken sweet though). As for the stepping stone and safety, I believe that's why it's in a hole in the ground. I don't believe the stone could travel more than 10ft up and 20ft sideways. I also use electric ignition, even though I describe using a fuse.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
jtobako (author)KentsOkay2007-04-04

At anvil firings (100+ lb anvil) with a similar rig they get 75+ feet.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
jtobako (author)Vendigroth2007-04-16

The technical term is ASO (Anvil Shaped Object). Most anvils are not made for blacksmithing, they are too soft-made of cast iron or the wrong steel. When a professional smith gets one of these ASOs, they end up as door stops, boat anchors, cement fill, ect-anything but the tool they look like.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
themasterpyro (author)jtobako2007-11-05

ya the real ones are like 250 and it weighs about 170 lbs

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
jtobako (author)themasterpyro2007-11-06

Real anvils have hard faces. But they can be 1 pound (jewelers) to 1000+ pounds (for forge welding ship anchors). Old ones have a steel plate welded to a wrought iron body, new ones are cast steel. Good anvils bounce-a big ball bearing dropped on the surface will act like a supper ball and almost bounce back into your hand. The same test on a cast iron anvil will bounce about half way back.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
Goodhart (author)jtobako2007-11-06

Yep, a smithy working on a project, keeps his rhythm going by lightly dropping his hammer on the face and letting it bounce.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
jtobako (author)Goodhart2007-11-06

Some do and some don't. And some find it very annoying (like my teacher).

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
Goodhart (author)jtobako2007-09-19

A "smithy's" anvil has a "plate" of properly tempered iron over the flat area. A nearly lost art is the Art of Anvil refacing sadly.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
jtobako (author)Goodhart2007-09-19

Or just use good steel in the first place : ) Yes, I know the history. But the fact is that most 'anvils' are currently made that shape for marketing reasons, and out of cast iron for economic reasons.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
Goodhart (author)jtobako2007-09-19

Ah yep. I just know I had to have a few resurfaced in my day :-) t'warnt an easy task either, but it sure is better then paying over $5/lb for a 170+ lb anvil. I miss the days I could swing a 26 lb sledge *sigh*

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)jtobako2007-04-04
user
jtobako (author)KentsOkay2007-04-04

Two anvils base to base (one up-side-down). There is a hole in the bottom one for the charge, making it a barrel-less mortar. Not sure of the charge, but they had to dig one anvil out of 3+ feet of soft soil when it landed.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)2007-04-29

I was wondering if anybody would be willing (and dumb enough) to collaborate on making this into an Instructable? The only thing I can offer is either eternal glory, or a very long hospital stay.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
themasterpyro (author)KentsOkay2007-11-05

ill do this. i have access to all the materials and im willing (possibly a little dumb and haphazard too) as for the reward ill take the very long hospital stay

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
lemonie (author)KentsOkay2007-04-29

It's not going to work (in the way you intend anyway). Otherwise I'm quite enthusiastic about fire and explosions. L

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)lemonie2007-04-29

Are you saying you wish to give it a try?

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
lemonie (author)KentsOkay2007-04-30

If you used high explosive, you might have some luck. However, the gas would then only be a minor component. I don't thing black powder will burst the can. (No) L

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
listentomewhine (author)2007-04-18

Hats off to rocketscientist dude. I've tried something similar a few months ago and the result was spectacular. A small piece of advice....empty an entire can of zippo fluid into the cement and mix well and seal off the entire thing to prevent naphtha (lighter fluid) from vapourising. Also pack in as much flash powder as u can tapping and compressing it while u fill the can. This will not just look nike a nuke exploding but will even work like it....but just like the rocketscientist brother says.....don't blame anyone but yourself incase you find yourself knocking on heaven's door.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user

Thanks dude. The only reason this isn't an Instructable, is because I never took any pictures or documentation of this experiment. Why? Because the cops know where to drive when they hear a bang. If anyone would be willing to make a collaboration on it with me, I'd be eternally gratefull.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user

Worthy collaborations are always welcome and desirable bro, except for the fact that we might be separated by a dozen longitudes. But we can always discuss projects here. :)

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
twisted (author)2007-04-14

I am goin to give this a go eventually. Nice idea anyways, ~Twisted

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)twisted2007-04-16

If you're going to set one off, use electrical ignition, and stand at least 50ft away.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
Vendigroth (author)2007-04-16

If you fire this aboveground, but still with the concrete case and the top secured down, how much explosive power would you get out of it?

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)Vendigroth2007-04-16

It depends on the amount of firing explosive, thickness of casing,size of can, ect. The concrete top would probly come of with enough force to penetrate the underside of a small car. This thing is mostly incinderary, look at lemonie's instructable Big Explosion, Bang, Fireball, (the link is in the topic above). He managed to get a picture of a gas tank exploding. The Fireball bomb would detonatein a similar manner, except there would be flying cement everywhere. If your going to set one off, use electrical ignition (rocket engine ignitors, lots of wire, battery). I would not recomend standing within 50ft of this thing when it goes off. I like the idea of making a pressure switch, it would be excellent for booby traps.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
Vendigroth (author)2007-04-14

this is fiendish. perhaps you could put some sort of a pressure pad on the concrete slab, linked to the detonator, to make this thing like a landmine "I TOLD YOU NOT TO STEP ON MY LAWN!"

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)Vendigroth2007-04-14

There wouldn't be anything left of somebody to argue with. Since this things mainly incendiery, it make a good car destroyer. "Would the shopper with the Humvee taking up 3 parking spaces please come move their vehicle before we blow it up"

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
Vendigroth (author)KentsOkay2007-04-15

teaches them a lesson, tho but somewhat briefly and terminally

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
lemonie (author)2007-04-04

The nuclear implosion mechanism is designed to produce a spherical critical mass. This is quite tricky to achieve with e.g. plutonium, most experts reckon that N. Korea didn't manage to get it quite right (and the US spent quite some time on this) Thermonuclear devices are more interesting, look them up on the internet L

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)lemonie2007-04-05

Oh yah, hope you didn't mind me using your Instructable.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
KentsOkay (author)lemonie2007-04-05

Yes, your correct (as usual, are you Limies realy smarter than us Americans?) as to the mechanics of an A bomb. A H (thermonuclear) bomb works kind of the same as an A bomb, except that it uses fusion instead of fission. But to gain the amount of energy used to start the fussion reaction, a fission device is used.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
jtobako (author)2007-04-04

I believe your assumptions are wrong in what creates a fireball and mushroom cloud. A fireball is created when the liquid transforms into a gas, rapidly expanding and mixing with oxygen. When the gas mix reaches critical (the right percentage of O2) the flame flashes inward (the fireball). Air currents and heat rising create the mushroom cloud (a vortex?). What you have here is...no change from your first experiment other than being more dangerous. The liquid butane will not compress, but will vaporize from the heat. Any flame will be focused upward into a jet just like the can. Any thought about where the cement brick will end up? ("I shot an arrow into the air...")

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer