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Government Trojans !!! Answered

What do you all think of this practice ? Coming soon to a pc near you....government trojans.

A government Trojan is spyware installed on a computer or network by a law enforcement agency for the purpose of capturing information relevant to a criminal investigation. Depending on the program, government Trojan horses may intercept email or VoIP traffic, scan hard drives for relevant digital media or even record conversations and videoconferences. As this type of software captures data and then sends it back to a central server for processing and analysis without a user's knowledge, it is generally classified as a back door Trojan horse virus.
Governments have approached implementing Trojan horses in different ways. Swiss government agencies have been reported to be working with Internet service providers (ISPs) to record speech on an infected PC's microphone, as opposed to of intercepting encrypted voice packets. German agencies have sought authority to plant Trojan horses on the hard drives of suspected criminals using email that would install keyloggers, record webcams and microphones and scan infected hard drives for for documents, diagrams and photography. These email messages would be tailored to each unique target, similar to the method used in spear phishing attacks.

More about Government Trojans.

39 Replies

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xACIDITYx (author)2008-03-11

I hope Bitdefender will catch it... Wouldn't that be kind of against the 4th ammendment? They are unreasonably searching our property (harddrives, history, etc.). If the government breaks the 4th ammendment, I'm breaking out the 2nd ammendment.

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Labot2001 (author)xACIDITYx2008-03-11

civil liberties or security? take your pick ;]

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Goodhart (author)Labot20012008-03-11

It isn't security when innocents are hauled off to prison...and it happens. That is the wrong question. The question is, how can we "become secure" without being paranoid schizophrenics.

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Labot2001 (author)Goodhart2008-03-11

The question is, how can we "become secure" ...

Aye. But unfortunately, that's a hard question to answer. =/

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Uncle Slappy (author)Labot20012008-05-05

Maybe by enforcing the immigration laws? Hunt down students that over stay visas? Stop teaching nuclear technology to foreign 'students' from third world countries? How about removing the 'special treatment' status from all 'minority' groups? Just because your a 'minority' or not;if you preach hate, why should they be protected? The good old days are gone, the bad boys are using trust and 'common sense' of America against us. The naive ideas of the '60's' have died in the face of the hard reality of the 2001. To be secure in any way we must start being responsible for our actions and what comes out of our mouths/minds. On the other hand we could go back to 'the good old days' protocols and wait for the next terror attack and what do think the knee jerk reaction will be then? I don't enjoy the new security but the alternative is worse.

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Goodhart (author)Labot20012008-03-11

It can not be answered simply, because such things are multilayered and complex. There is no one phrase answer. It all has to do with common sense, NOT panicking, not suspecting everyone that looks at you sideways, not having peepholes into everyone's bedrooms to see who is sleeping with whom, etc. If we continue on our present course, we will have to X-ray everyone that enters ANY building, even our own homes and our own relatives. This isn't Big Brother we are talking about anymore, it is more like Big DADDY. Well, the gov. is NOT my daddy.

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Labot2001 (author)Goodhart2008-03-11

Amen! The government has definitely gone from sticking up for us and keeping us safe, right to telling us what we can and can't do and peeking in on our private affairs!

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Uncle Slappy (author)iman2008-05-05

Glad you understand that Apple is not immune. As a niche computer most hackers don't bother with them. Nothing interesting going on, ie no business system. However as a wide open system they do make easy access to the net and work as a fine place to hide behind. So maybe you are Ward Cleaver but the guy with the wireless connect thru your system ... sleep well pilgrim.

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Goodhart (author)iman2008-03-11

If you really think your MAC is safe from Gov prying if they want to, you are less secure than I am. At least I can be on the watch for the problem; but with that attitude, they'll get you without you even knowing it. ;-)

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iman (author)Goodhart2008-03-11

lol I was just kidding :) I know that macs can have trojans and "bugs" but I don't do anything illegal or online banking soo I don't really care :)

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Goodhart (author)iman2008-03-11

Nor do I (well, I do a bit of bill paying at secure sites), but yeah. I am not worried about it at the moment, but it could become a concern in the future: watch out, here come the "thought police" ;-)

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zachninme (author)xACIDITYx2008-03-18

They're not doing it to everyone -- just those whom they get a warrent for, I'm assuming.

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Goodhart (author)zachninme2008-03-18

Well, it is purported to be some of those they are suspicious of.....*sigh* MacArthur has returned....

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Goodhart (author)xACIDITYx2008-03-11

I have a bunch of different "checkers" none running all the time except one, to avoid conflicts, but I update often, and run often. I am hoping diligence will pay off.

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Goodhart (author)Goodhart2008-03-11

Not that I have anything to hide.....I just hate people peering into my bathroom window as I take a shower; you know?

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xACIDITYx (author)Goodhart2008-03-11

Yeah. When I'm done on the internet, I clear the Cache, cookies, history, etc.

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Goodhart (author)xACIDITYx2008-03-11

AND as a precaution, every now and then, I go into the temp files and whack all that I can over a certain time period, manually. I like to keep an internal port scanner running too JIC

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xACIDITYx (author)Goodhart2008-03-11

yeah. I run spyware and antivurus twice a day, but then again i use a PC. If only i could use linux...

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Goodhart (author)xACIDITYx2008-03-11

At this point, I am still on a Windows PC also. Mainly because my wife's ability to learn new tricks (or operating systems) has greatly decreased over the past few years *sigh*

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YummyPancakes (author)2008-03-18

ACK! *wimper* Dirty FBI, CIA... Let's see what Kaspersky Labs think of them! Yea!

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Goodhart (author)2008-03-11

Would these help any LOL

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Punkguyta (author)2008-03-11

Yes the government does give out trojans, go to your local medical clinic.

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ledzep567 (author)2008-03-11

hmmm this sucks. they would probably test one out on my computer because the FBI made the mistake of supplying their(or one of their) email adresses on their website...

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CameronSS (author)2008-03-10

What was that whole Bill of Rights paper someone came up with 200 years ago? There was something in there...Amendment IV, I believe...

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Oh, yeah. This is the government. They somehow managed to not have to obey their own laws. Not that attacking countries in the Middle East without a declaration of war is illegal, of course, or listening to people's phone calls.

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Goodhart (author)CameronSS2008-03-11

Listening to MY phone calls is really kind of useless. Most of them are for my wife at my house, so I end up saying: "hello? Who? yeah, she is right here....hold on" LOL

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chooseausername (author)2008-03-11

It's not really new ... I remember that Windows 98 was highly criticized because Microsoft added a back door for the NSA. Few years ago, I've read articles about hardware back doors in some modems and some encryption microchip.

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Goodhart (author)chooseausername2008-03-11

No, it isn't new, just more widespread.....worldwide....

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Goodhart (author)2008-03-11

It would seem that we have a situation where those in control are the ones "at fault" for a lot of law breaking anyway, so it stands to reason that we should not put ALL our trust in them *sigh* Now what ?

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LinuxH4x0r (author)2008-03-10
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teaaddict314 (author)LinuxH4x0r2008-03-10

first off i just wanna say zeitgeist is like the divinci code. but as for the F**K the government thing.........well...as rage against the machine once said "As the polls close like a casket On truth devoured"

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Goodhart (author)LinuxH4x0r2008-03-10

Although no official U.S. government Trojan program is known to exist, past revelations regarding the NSA's Total Information Awareness (TIA) project and Echelon, a signals intelligence (SIGINT) collection and analysis network operated by the U.S. government in cooperation with several other nations, make the existence of such a program credible.
*sigh*

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Doctor What (author)2008-03-10

I'm sure someone would eventually find a way to destroy whatever trojan that they use. But it is a serious invasion of privacy and violates our constitutional rights. Damn the government. Damn them.

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Goodhart (author)Doctor What2008-03-10

The CEH (certified ethical hackers) may be our last hope to any form of privacy or ethics for that matter.

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killerjackalope (author)2008-03-10

Eh, only the next logical step in the information monitoring business, the whole communications thing apparently can pick up certain keywords like bomb, leaders names that sort of junk, whether or not one chooses to believe these things is another matter, along with whether or not these things exist. If they do that will viruscheckers find them?

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Goodhart (author)killerjackalope2008-03-10

If sophisticated enough, no. They could be "allowed" by the programs if those that sell virus checkers were convinced that they "need to be"; if you know what I mean.

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Goodhart (author)Goodhart2008-03-10

In other words, the virus checkers can be set to "ignore" certain things. Anyone that has had reason to use a keylogger on their own machine because they were suspicious of their spouse or something, knows all about how to get the firewall and virus checker to "ignore" the program behind the curtain, so to speak.

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