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Guitar Amps Answered

Apologies to Wario, we've hijacked your original topic...So here's a new one that (might) stay on topic... Wario's OP: Well all of you welcome to my little group, heres our first topic, Should there be an instructible about how to create an amplifier? I think so because they are always expensive to buy, to build one though would be fun as well as useful, now you tell me and everyone else your opinion.

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mesaboogieonline (author)2008-08-24

I've always wanted to take on a project like that, just never seem to find the time to do it.

John
Mesa Boogie Amps

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Goodhart (author)2008-07-01

How about a Guitar Tuning Electronic Aid ? I have the schematics for that somewhere around here.....

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gmoon (author)Goodhart2008-07-02

Sounds like a plan. Someone (gschoppe?) posted a nice LED tuner. Always room for more...

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Goodhart (author)gmoon2008-07-02

well, it would require a good ear to use what I had planned. since the first string of a guitar (E) would produce a frequency of 82.4 Hz.. There are several ways to do this (and since one can tune the rest of the strings, once the E string is tuned, this should be all required). But, if this is overly simplistic in it's approach, I will leave it.

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gmoon (author)Goodhart2008-07-02

A tuning standard is a good idea. You wouldn't need a great ear, because of the "beat frequency" that's created when overlaying the guitar and tuner signals. If the two aren't right on, you get a prominent out-of-phase beat. (having all six freqs might be a good, tho...the instrument's intonation can effect the accuracy of tuning from one string, although 'harmonic' tuning usually works...)

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roze20 (author)2008-06-30

John, what you for that if you are really interested to play gutar in proper way.. contact at training institution.. there will be nudes and formula ...for playing gutar...
so if is hard to get the instruction here...
contact institution for that..

thanks
roze
It's no secret that Fender makes great guitar amps, but which one is the best? We think it's the Blues Junior. Find out why. http://fenderbluesjunioramps.com

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mondaymonkey (author)2007-11-29

Thanks. I am interested in why tube parts are so expensive other than their rarity. I have many things I want to do to a Aria STG 006 I have lying at home. I bought it cuz it was cheap, and a perfect guitar to mod. Its a HSH Strat and the woods very good quallity, as much as i can tell, tis a single piece body:D. It has some issues with grounding, and the pickups aren't the greatest, although their okay. I heard Mighty Mites are powerful mothers, and are worth the 40 bucks 3 times over. Also, I am wanting to put in a killswitch in. With these mods, its gonna haul ass. On the Amp side of things, i have a Vox Ad30 (yea, i know, i know, i should buy the AC30 but whos got 1500 bucks nowadays? the AD sells for 250) Any comments on any suggestions?

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john654 (author)mondaymonkey2008-06-30

I too know o play guitor .... but i dint have any proper guidence... if anybody there to teach me guitor??....if you are willing mail me......

Thank you



John

It's no secret that Fender makes great guitar amps, but which one is the best? We think it's the Blues Junior. Find out why.

<a href="http://fenderbluesjunioramps.com">fenderbluesjunioramps</a>

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gmoon (author)mondaymonkey2007-11-30

This finally made the forum, more than 12 hrs after I got the post as a 'reply.' I already answered you via PM, but it's still on-topic...

I've got a strat copy also (my trash-o-caster instructable) that has cheapo pickups. Mighty Mites are something I've considered, too. If one of us pulls the trigger and does it, we should post...

Re: tube amp parts-- Yes, the rarity has something to do with it. But they are also just complex devices to manufacture. You can usually find an individual tube for an OK price, but it adds up quickly.

The biggest single expense is the transformers. Since tubes require so many different voltages (heater, plate A & B, etc.) at relatively higher amperage than SS, the transformers tend to be pricey. Especially since modern devices usually only require 5V, 12V or +-12V (24v.) They just don't make many of the older type trannies, hence the cost. And a tube amp needs an output transformer, too.

A Vox AC30 would rock! If that's your sound, try to get one. And keep it--I know many who are crying over all the gear they sold in the past, much of which is worth $$$$$ today...

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Wario (author)2008-02-21

no worries, what you wanna do with the topic is up to you guys.

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mondaymonkey (author)2007-11-29

I'm a bit interested on how to build a 20 watt tube. My idea is to build a basic no frills Tube amp, just gain and volume controls. I would then buy a pod or some other preamp and just run the set through their. Only problem is that Pods are expensive. I think the best way otherwise is to take the preamp off a thrown away amp with the same power level. That begs the question, where can you find old amps to take the housing, and other goods off of?

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gmoon (author)mondaymonkey2007-11-29

Where, exactly, the characteristic tube sound originates in a circuit is always a point for debate. For the real thing, it's the whole circuit--preamp, power amp, even the tube rectifiers contribute to the sound.

A more modern (post 1980) 'hard' sound isn't purely a tube sound, anyway. Some external FX are need for most guitarists, tube or solid state (which I gather is what you're saying.) Since 'built in' FX are fixed, and often overkill, many people windup disliking amps that have them. They are 'free,' of course, on many amps, but I'd rather add my own.

You could always build a tube distortion box, and use that with a cheaper SS amp.

For a decent combo amp, the projects at 18watt.com sound like a good starting point for you. The 'minimal' version uses only 4 tubes and two transformers. This is a push-pull design. Warning: the parts for even the minimal amp will still set you back $150-$200 at best...

A 5-7 watt Class A amp (like a Fender Champ) could probably be built for under $100. A true Class A amp is considered to have the most 'tuby' sound. But that doesn't really mean distortion, just that warm, naturally compressed sound.

And remember, loudness is logarithmic. Twice as loud as 5 watts == 50 watts.

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mondaymonkey (author)2007-11-28

Somebody should post a homemade tube amp here. I am planning to build one sometime in the newyear, but I will probably copy or take parts from several different schematics. I would like to see a migration away from crappy little headphone amps to full 120 Watt tube with effects. People have built them, and someone should post one here

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gmoon (author)mondaymonkey2007-11-29

Absolutely. There is at least one tube amp project on instructables (not, I think, guitar oriented.) I'm currently rebuilding a low-wattage vintage (1961) tube practice amp. In the process, I've found tons of schematics for simple tube amplifiers--the info is useful for modding that circuit. Maybe I'll do an instructable on 'recapping' (replacing the capacitors) old amps? The next logical step is to build an amp from scratch...Although a high-wattage amp is a bit too complex (and less useful) for me.

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mondaymonkey (author)gmoon2007-11-29

You know, i have a couple solid state and hybrid state amps at home. I've always wondered how hard it would be to convert them to tubes. I mean, if i opened one up, and the transistor was easily cut out of the circuit board, and a similar tube was installed, would it be worth a whole bunch more?

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gmoon (author)mondaymonkey2007-11-29

Although vacuum tubes and transistors perform similar functions, you can't just interchange 'em. Valves (tubes) need high plate voltages, generally 100V minimum and often exceeding 300V. But each stage is cap coupled, so it's theoretically possible. But better to just separate the preamp and power stages conceptually (and physically.) The tube section will need a lot more 'support' components than the transistors did....

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gmoon (author)2007-10-28

And here's a copy of the only guitar post in the thread (most of it):

Make had a nice LM386 cracker-box amp recently (I can't find the link.) Here's a similar one, the Ruby amp.

If you're thinking tube amp, there are several instructables for those, also. But I wouldn't recommend tube projects for the inexperienced...

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whatsisface (author)gmoon2007-10-28

KITEMANS LAW!!!!!!! Oh sorry..

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