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How Can I Remove This Stripped Screw? Answered

On my Honda SL 125 engine on the lower part in the corner, there is this one screw that is preventing me from pulling the whole thing apart. It's driving me crazy. The problem is that it is stripped and nothing I try works to get it out. I also sort of flattened out the lower half of the screw, so that I could try and grab the upper half with some pliers, but that only messed it up further.

I've attached a couple of images of the screw if that helps.

I read today that gluing a screw driver to the screw with super glue might work, but I wouldn't have thought it would.

Any suggestions?

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liquidhandwash (author)2018-02-22

If you are good at MIG welding, you can build up the end of the screw by spot welding the head. Take your time and and let it cool for a few second then add another spot of weld until you have enough to grab with vice grips or you can weld a nut on the end.

The heat will go down the bolt and help loosen it up on the threads. Ive done this many times and it works great.

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gmoon (author)2018-02-19

Like everyone wrote, a screw extractor is the way to go here. I had to extract two bolts that sheered off the splitting wedge of a log splitter. A 15 ton ram will do that.

It would be awkward, but I'd use a drill press to prep the stripped screw, if you can. Should unscrew easily with the extractor, once you make a clean hole. Good luck!

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Phil B (author)2018-02-12

There are videos at YouTube on removing screws with stripped heads. Several options are included in each video. Sometime covering the head with a wide rubber band and pushing down very hard on the screwdriver will do that job.

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cerberustugowar (author)2018-02-12

I'm with Iceng, Looks like a pretty common job for an extractor set. You can get ones like iceng has post and they also come with the corresponding left hand drill bit (it drills in the counter clockwise rotation and may grab the bolt and un-screw it) you then have the correct size hole for the extractor. I would first hit it with a punch, the hit can help to release the bond between the threads. then make sure you have a nice flat spot in the centre that you can mark with a center punch and then drill directly down the center. It is best to drill the hole all the way through the bolt. You could then heat the aluminum with a torch which it will expand faster than the steel fatener and then tap in the extractor and remove the bolt being careful not to break it off in the hole. Another thing you could start with is using a chisel on the edge of the head and striking it so that the bolt will turn counter clock wise. Also now that I look, I don't know what else is inside holding things together, but you could likely grind the head off and pull the halves apart because the threads will be located in the other half. Always lots of ideas. Just need to start at the easiest one that has the potential to do the least amount of damage. Let us know how it goes.

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steveastrouk (author)iceng2018-02-12

+1
Acid is very effective

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iceng (author)iceng2018-02-11

Nitric acid attacks steel much more then aluminum..

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randofo (author)2018-02-12

If you have a Dremel (or similar) cut a slot in it and use a flathead screwdriver to remove it.

Alternately:
https://www.instructables.com/id/5-Ways-to-Remove-a-Stripped-Screw/

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