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How can i make a audio combining circuit? Answered

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steveastrouk (author)2011-09-13

You sound like you need to look for "mixer" circuits.

Steve

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kool1zero (author)steveastrouk2011-09-13

But, im worried that im going to hear some of A when i have it set to B or vice versa. am i just worried?

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steveastrouk (author)kool1zero2011-09-14

If the switch isolates the connection properly you shouldn't have a problem.

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kool1zero (author)steveastrouk2011-09-16

all of the mixer circuits i see dont have any way (that i can tell of keeping sound from leaking over from an input im not using

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steveastrouk (author)kool1zero2011-09-17

That's why you turn down, or switch off the input on the mixer That's what all the knobs DO.

Steve

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kool1zero (author)steveastrouk2011-09-25

what i want is both inputs to be equalized to the same level, not to have to adjust them to the same level

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kool1zero (author)steveastrouk2011-09-25

yeah, regulated to a volume, becauswe im going to be combinging two and whenever they try to play at the same time i dont want the volume to be twice as loud, and i also dont want to hear and of A when im in B but i want them to be equal when im on combined and only C when its on C

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steveastrouk (author)kool1zero2011-09-25

This has turned from a simple box of switches into something quite nasty, if you want it to be automatic. You are now in the realm of AGC circuits, and mixers.

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kool1zero (author)steveastrouk2011-09-16

i added a third image to the above question. think that wire up would work with a decent mixer circuit (repeating that setup in more sets of pins for the other channel of stereo and ground?)

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thegeeke (author)2011-09-13

Combine them by linking + to + and - to -. Off hand, I would say that the only way that one would overpower the other would be if there was way more gain on one than the other. You could control this by adding a pot on each of the + leads before they mix.

Also, you could just go to your local pro-audio store and look at a cheap mixer. I've seen them for as low as $40.

If you give me more info about what you're trying to accomplish, I might be able to help you better. (After all... I've seen some pretty intresting things in my years as an audio production specialist.) :)

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