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How to make a piezo sensor gradually light up an LED strip by tapping on the sensor repeatedly? Answered

Hi there, I want to be able to gradually light up an LED strip by tapping on a piezo sensor trigger drum repeatedly. The aim is to have 2 separate LED strips, and a sensor for each, as it will be a game to see who can light their LED strip the whole way up the first.
I have a 1m WS2812B 60 LED RGB LED Strip and a piezo sensor trigger drum.
Thank you in advanced.

7 Replies

user
seandogue (author)2016-11-25

use a non-autoreset integrator

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user
iceng (author)2016-11-24

I'm doing lasers tapped with chopsticks

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user
rickharris (author)iceng2016-11-24

Is this a neat way to chop up your food so that you can pick it up easier?

:-)

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iceng (author)rickharris2016-11-25

LOL .... The more i want to be an old hand with Asian delicacies the more my hands betray my lacking skill that is where I wondered if the laser would be like an LED with more stringent electronic limits... And I'm no 74 drummer... Working out mass vs speed. A chop stick produces a short glimmer it needs a spectacular micro dome for dispersing all my colors...

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-max- (author)2016-11-24

If you are using an arduino, program it to increment a variable up every time a tap is detected, and another snippet of code that drives the LEDs appropriately. (I've not played around with the Neopixel LEDs much, but I assume you know how to make them work.)

Add a reset pin to reset the variable that represents essentially the number of times since the controller was initiated, so you can start over.

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On the hardware front, you may need to condition the signal from the piezo so it can talk to the arduino. Piezos can generate some nasty high voltage transients and ringing around 100V, which must be filtered out. A zener diode can clamp the voltage across the piezo to a safe level (5V) and a comparitor can "square up" the waveform to make it easier for the arduino to digest.

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rickharris (author)2016-11-23

Your going to need a microprocessor and suitable programming. Are you going to be able to do that?

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