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How to mount Peltier elements? Answered

A peltier is a element that gets very hot on one side, and very cold on the other side. Cold enough (with enough power) to make frost all over it. So. I got one, I want to make nice cold cold air. I read wiki, if you don't heat sink it, it will self destroy. If I heatsink the cold side, then a fan on the heat sink to blow the cold freeze air, will it be fine? Or must I cool the hot side too? Peltiers are cool :D

22 Replies

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guillotine (author)2011-06-20

the heat sink is for the hot side.
the cooler you get the hot side the cooler the cool side will be.

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Ml123456 (author)2010-10-20

Hi does coolant or water work as a good heat sink on the cold side? M

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steveastrouk (author)Ml1234562010-10-23

A heat sink is a block of VERY flat metal to which you attach your cell. How you get rid of the heat thereafter is up to you. We've used air or chilled methanol or water, depending on circumstances.

I can't stress to much the importance of FLAT heatsinks.

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yourcat (author)2009-06-09

You gotta sink both sides.

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kalboon (author)2009-06-09

Hi i have a TEC also, what is the most efficiant way to heat sink for cooling? Have them both the same size or could i have a smaller one on the cold and a larger on the hot, would that make the cold side get colder?, or would the hot side over power it? im planning on mounting it so the cold side faces inside of a small insulated box i have, and i want it to get as cold as possible, its a 12v out of an old coleman TEC cooler, the inside dimentions of the box are 6 inch x 8 inch.any help would be awsome.

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NachoMahma (author)2008-03-08

. All the Peltiers I've seen have heatsinks on both sides. On CPU/GPU coolers, it's the chip on the cold side. The Peltier itself may not require a heatsink on the cold side, but it will be more efficient with one. . As others have mentioned, the hot side heatsink will help prevent the Peltier from overheating. . . BTW, has anyone experimented with stacking Peltiers? Ie, mechanically in series.

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user

I did wonder if that was possible, I wonder where you would get the most effieciency from on that score... it could be an intersting way to make a powerful cooling or heating device, I had an idea for a hot box with them, to make a kind of superheting box without burning anything, whether or not the peltiers would like this is another story...

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Killa-X (author)killerjackalope2008-03-08

I always wanted a peltier. I thought it be fun to make my own box, and be able to have a freezer. I saw a youtube video with one. The guy put a high 50V into it, and it was -5 degrees on the metal. wow

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alexhalford (author)Killa-X2008-04-22

Hi, when a peltier unit has a max temperature difference of 70 degrees, does that mean that it won't generate more than that difference, or that if you allow it to go over that difference it will break?

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killerjackalope (author)Killa-X2008-03-08

I'm sure they have some really great uses we're not thinking of, If you got a really powerful one you could supercool your computer I suppose... If you could get the hot side to run at boiling temperature it would make an interesting kettle to say the least...

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user

. I'm guessing that heat will become a problem. Since they are a deltaT device, the hot side of the second unit would be REAL hot. I have three small units laying around, but I can't get the heatsinks off to enable stacking. :(

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user

it's kind of hard to tell what would happen, there will obviously be a limit, a sort of perfect number... it depends on how the units respond to heat, they actively move energy so you might not get any gain from stacking units of the same power in series, you'd have to either keep moving up or use a smaller unit to give the bigger unit below more capcacity by effectively increasing the amount of heat it can move without overheating. Actually a good test would be to simply set two in series with the heatsinks meshed together and do temp. checks on each side and compare to the individual stats.

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user

1) the hot side needs a good, large heatsink. the cold side can have a small one, but all the hot on the cold side ends up on the hot side. a large heat sink is essential 2) i have heard of the odd stacked peltier on some overclocking site. if i remeber where, i will post a link.

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user

It's all very complicated, I do however wish to see how big a peltier can get then I'm going to be really dumb and hook it up directly to the giant generators sitting at work and give it 50KW of power, I'm thinking a mile of Ice one side and a mile of scorched earth on the other side, yes I'm childish and silly but we've been over that. The stacking thing is interesting and would be a cool experiment, also i had an Idea for cooling liquids etc. fast for drinks using a 'cold plate' based on peltiers.

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user

they already exist. google usb beverage cooler. but they are not very powerful.

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user

I know but I'm talking about a hot plate /cold plate machine here somtheing that could cool liquids on one side and on the other boil water on the other. Ideally the temps would be like -5C and 140C but I'm not sure thats a possibility.

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Hi i was just wondering, whats the minimum temperature you can get with peltiers??? (anything close to about -80 degrees C for making dry ice)???

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Killa-X (author)alexhalford2008-03-12

Im not answering, im more telling. I would think you would need a lot of power. I know they can frost up, i saw a wiki with 1 inch of frost on it. I once saw a youtube video showing -5F but I cant say. Maybe this will help. Low cost Type-T thermocouple input Peltier temperature controller with built-in solid state H-bridge driver. Controls over the -200°C to 260°C temperature range. Programmable via a Windows configuration program over RS232.

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guyfrom7up (author)2008-03-08

I think you only have to heatsink the hot side, coldness shouldn't effect electronics... i think

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tech-king (author)guyfrom7up2008-03-12

thought wrong. think electrolytic capacitors. also, most ics have a thermal range between 60 and -10 celsius.

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whatsisface (author)2008-03-08

I would have thought the idea would be to heat sink the hot side especially, because that would protect from overheating, but you may need to talk to someone experienced.

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