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How to power up a crt? Answered


I have a crt from a monitor and I want to power it how do i do that?
I have its flyback connected to a zvs driver, and a computer power supply

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Re-designBest Answer (author)2011-06-06

Don't bother trying. If you didn't salvage all of what you need intact then you have almost no chance of success. And failure at this level can be lethal. Touch the wrong thing and you get electrocuted. Supply an over voltage and your crt will emit radiation.

Better idea is to start with another monitor and work from that.

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orksecurity (author)Re-design2011-06-06

He's not kidding about radiation, by the way. Electron beam slamming to a sudden stop is how you make an X-ray machine. TV designers are careful about their voltages and shielding in order to limit that danger.

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Alex1M6 (author)2011-10-18

Positive electrode goes to the anode hole on the CRT and negative return just clip it onto one of the pins at the base of the CRT, one will eventually work. How ever don't expect to be able to feed it a picture signal, that is almost impossible without the original circuit board or the technical know-how.

Just be careful of x-rays from the front of the CRT when there is HV present.

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orksecurity (author)2011-06-06

You are aware that you are dealing with potentially lethal voltages and currents, right? (The idea of someone homebrewing a CRT monitor scares me, to be perfectly honest, despite the fact that Heathkit used to sell TVs in kit form.)

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Re-design (author)orksecurity2011-06-06

Heathkit sold solid designs with very good instructions on where to put what and where to not touch. But I still never that the courage to build one of the kits that had HV.

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theVader75 (author)Re-design2011-06-07

I work very safe and I am very aware that the currents and the voltages I am working with are lethal but I am not scared by high voltage

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ARJOON (author)2011-06-06

be clearer. too funny to understand

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