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Is it possible to grow a plant in a bottle? Answered

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I just got a great idea that I would like to try. I tried searching the web for similar ideas, but found nothing. So, I have decided to try it and post an instructable. My idea is to insert some garden soil into a 1.5 liter plastic bottle then drop in a seed and cover it lightly with some more soil. Then, I will punch a few holes in the bottle cap and screw it on. Will the seed germinate and grow? Thanks.

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user
Re-designBest Answer (author)2011-08-04

You can grow plants in the bottle with the cap on. I've done it several times. It's better using a big bottle like a gallon or 5 gallon water bottle if you can find on of the old ones with smooth sides.

The plant makes it own atmosphere.  At times it will even look like it rained on the sides of the jar.

I repeat that you can make the jar airtight and the plants will still live.

Check this link out!

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user
seandogue (author)2011-08-06

Yes, that used to be very popular during the 1970s but fell out of fad during the 1980s

There are certain plants that are better candidates for a bottle terrarium, because many plants will grow too fast and choke the "system".

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iceng (author)2011-08-04

I started an avocado between two sponges in a bottle like this with the top wider.
It survived two re plantings but died on the 3d at 5 feet high.

A

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CatTrampoline (author)2011-08-04

I would leave the cap off for air exchange once the seed germinates, but it should work fine. Ask anyone over 40 about the terrarium in a glass jug craze of the 70's. One-gallon glass apple juice containers work great.

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user

I must have missed that one. I just remember learning the hard way that the traditional circular-top fishbowl didn't have enough surface area for gas exchange unless you hooked up a bubbler.

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user

Yes, fish have more stringent requirements than most plants do. Good petshops will steer their customers away from the glass bowls.

The terrariums are good for plants that require high humidity, like ferns and carnivorous plants. They aren't so good for plants that get powdery mildew if the humidity is too high.

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orksecurity (author)2011-08-04

Note that in container with that narrow a neck, there's a a risk of smothering what's living inside it. (Plants need fresh air too, even if they use the gasses in a different mix than we do.) But it's certainly worth trying, to see what happens...

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orksecurity (author)orksecurity2011-08-04

Obligatory song cue: "If I Could Put Thyme In A Bottle..."

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user
steveastrouk (author)2011-08-04

Look for the word "Terrarium"

Steve

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