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Joining carpet pieces Answered

I'm looking for ideas on how carpet pieces might be joined together into a whole (e.g. rugs made from carpet samples).

The gaffer tape solution which is posted all over the web in tutorials isn't strong, only lasts a few months and doesn't work well with small carpet pieces.  I've successfully sewn carpet piece in the past with fishing line (so the stitches are strong and invisible) however this technique only works well with larger pieces due to the time it takes and amount of work.  Has anyone here tried any other techniques and been successful with both large and small carpet pieces?  My other idea was to use wood glue to glue the pieces to a hessian sheet.  I haven't tested this but the hessian base on most carpet pieces should merge well with the hessian sheet.

thoughts or ideas appreciated.

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garrettlynch (author)seamster2017-05-25

Just watched some videos of people doing this and it looks good. The video I watched the guy was doing it in a wardrobe/corner. Is it strong enough to use mid room for a rug where there might be more strain on the seam?

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user

Yes of course it is strong enough and no way it will hold ;)
All depends on the type of type you use.
For example the dirt cheap double sided "carpet tape" usually sticks really good to itself and all things it should not stick to but fails after a few weeks on carpet with a foam or sisal backing.
The good tape uses a quite thick layer of adhesive, almost like the stuff you find on fabric band aids.
If you use a hammer or similar to get good pressure it will last really long.
Main problem for joining bigger pieces of carpet is movement and stretching, so it really pays off to stretch the crpet in two directions before the final fixing.
For joints within a big room I usually use one strip right on the joint and then several seperate strips on top at a 90° angle that are about half a meter long.
These strips will give you the added strength so the seam won't come undone premature.

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user

Many thanks for the advice on this.

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caitlinsdad (author)seamster2017-05-24

They've also got the double sided sticky tape kind that doesn't require an iron to melt the hot glue lines before using. Also fun if you want to set up a big sheet of human fly-paper to run through for parties.

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garrettlynch (author)caitlinsdad2017-05-25

I don't think double sided sticky tape will hold. I have some here and it's not very strong, certainly not as strong as gaffer tape.

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caitlinsdad (author)garrettlynch2017-05-25

The double sided carpet seaming tape has industrial strength adhesive on it and is quite strong. Maybe you should use those outdoor mounting tapes which come in smaller rolls. Good luck.

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Downunder35m (author)2017-05-25

One option would be to use cotton strips and contact adhesive to join the pieces.
For bigger projects it pays off to buy the adhesive in cans and to use a very stiff paint brush.
Best to place on sheet of carpet on the perpared joining strip first and to hammer it in place using a few taps with a rubber mallet - the pressure makes the strenght with these adhesives.
The next pice you join "flipped up" so you can really press it against the othe carpet piece before getting too much contact with the adhesive.

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user

I like this technique as well. I'd imagine the cotton gives the seams good strength (similar to the hessian I mentioned). Will test. Thanks.

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