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Laptop Fan voltage booster Answered

Hi, my laptop is overheating because the fan isnt fast enough. My idea is to build a small voltage booster to increase the fan voltage a small bit. It will be overvolting the 5v fan but i dont mind. For example, when idleing, fan voltage is at 3.5v and at full load its at 5v and i would like it to be 1-2v higher at both points WHILE still maintaining the variable control (spinning faster and slower as needed) Problem is, im pretty good at soldering but i dont know how to make one. Could anyone help with this project
Thanks

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ttg tricksh0tzz (author)2014-07-02

I have done everything mentioned. Its an old laptop that i dont really care about, hence i dont mind overvolting. I am thinking about redesigning the cooling system (integrating water cooling) but I dont have time for that yet. I just need something quick that will do the job. I knew the core i7 would be hotter then my old i5 but damn its a whole new level of hot

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ttg tricksh0tzz (author)2014-07-02

I have done everything mentioned. Its an old laptop that i dont really care about, hence i dont mind overvolting. I am thinking about redesigning the cooling system (integrating water cooling) but I dont have time for that yet. I just need something quick that will do the job. I knew the core i7 would be hotter then my old i5 but damn its a whole new level of hot

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K00kie (author)2014-07-02

You could possibly try replacing the old fan with a higher cfm fan. Thats if it is configurable in your laptop. Also you could try redoing the thermal compuond on your heatsinks. That may help too, but all in all I agree with crapflinger.

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crapflinger (author)2014-07-02

"overvolting" the fan will create more heat in the fan and make it wear out faster. if your laptop is legitimately overheating (i.e. it's shutting down because of thermal events) with the fan as it was designed, then it's either a design flaw (which you should be able to find evidence of with a google search....if everyone's laptop of that model is crapping out then it's a design flaw) or something else is wrong.

if It's a design flaw, then you should be able to get some kind of warranty replacement or something.

it's more likely something else entirely. dirty heat sink, dirty fan, etc...

laptops are, by design, capable of handling more heat than a desktop. have you tried one of the laptop stands with a fan in it? or just raising the laptop off of the table/desk at all? usually increasing crossflow like that is enough to solve these kinds of problems

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