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Large NC (Normally Closed) Switch Answered

I am currently working on a project which requires a larger NC switch. The concept is that when someone sits on the switch, the current will be blocked and not flow. When the person stands up, the current will flow through the circuit. This specific switch has to be flat enough for someone to sit on. Does anybody have any ideas on how to build one?

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Toga_Dan (author)2017-06-03

If you use an office chair, could the switch be in or alongside the column? Those pneumatic cylinders typically give a bit when u sit.

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SamuelD79 (author)Toga_Dan2017-06-05

The switch could be alongside the column but an office chair seems to be unreliable when it comes to moving up and down. The pneumatic cylinders could move several times and send too many signals. However, the idea could work so I might try it later when I have the correct switch.

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Toga_Dan (author)SamuelD792017-06-13

http://www.ebay.com/itm/AC-380V-DC-250V-10A-Short-Roller-Lever-Actuator-Limit-Switch-Blk-LXW5-11G1-/311163545456

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Downunder35m (author)2017-05-31

LOL
Sometimes I wonder how many people are still able to think out of the box...
I'll give you a hint: Contact floor mat for alarm and security uses ;)

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SamuelD79 (author)Downunder35m2017-06-02

Sorry, I did not clarify that I need an inexpensive way of getting one. In addition, the floor mat for security uses does not seem to inverse the signal within itself. I need for all these functions to be in one pad on a seat. Are there any other products that might fit these needs?

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Downunder35m (author)SamuelD792017-06-03

Well it really is not too hard to use a transistor to invert a signal...
Otherwise think about placement, like Toga_Dan suggested, even a switch on a leg will work if you add some foam under it.
Last but not least, although a bit more costly than a simple switch: Capacitive sensors.

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