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Lumbar Laminectomy Spinal Surgery. (final update) Answered

Picture of
It looks like, after my visit today with the Surgeon, that the Lumbar Laminectomy is probably the best route for me to go at this point.

Tomorrow, if I can get my wife to agree with me, I will be making the appointment, hopefully for next week (Tues, or Thurs).

I don't believe in luck, so; here's hoping the surgeon is awake, skillful, and hasn't had so many coffees that his hands shake the morning of that surgery :-)

UPDATE #1:

I am having doubts about the process. I may go for now with only therapy, and if matters become worse rather then better, then have the surgery. But things have already taken a turn for the better.....I have felt the best today, then I have felt in the last 3 weeks. . . we shall see when I start.

UPDATE #2:

Until tomorrow, I will not know for sure, but at this point, my back is feeling a bit better. I have been able to go a little longer without pain meds then before, so I do think therapy will work.    I still have to get that second opinion however.
 

UPDATE #2.19375 supplemental:

I have my appointment @2:00 PM today for the second opinion. I hope we can come to an agreeable conclusion as to how to proceed with the treatment.   I will update again, when I know more.
 

UPDATE #3:

The Second opinion appt has been attended to, and we came to an agreement that 3 weeks of therapy should proceed any consideration of surgery.   So, if this works, I will be off work for only 3 more weeks.  If not, I will have to have surgery done, and will be off for at least 3-4 more.
 

 UPDATE #3.21978 supplemental:

I start therapy on Thursday, and will be finished November 5th if all goes as planned.



UPDATE #3.714155 supplemental:

Tuesday starts my official treatments as Thursday was just the initiation and measurement phase.  I will report on how well the first day of stretching, exercise, and time on the RACK went.  

 

UPDATE #4:

Newest estimate for my return to work is currently Nov. 5th or 6th (possibly the 9th, if they don't want me to start until Monday....we will see.
  Things are slowly improving.  I am sitting up for a bit longer now, although I am not able to stay put (sitting, standing, walking) for overly long periods yet; there is improvement.

UPDATE #5:

Finished with today's therapy session,  and started Traction for the first time.  I am feeling much better now.  Thursday, they will use the machine for an even longer period of time, and I should start to get further relief.

UPDATE #5.6297 supplemental:

Just got off the Traction machine an hour ago.  I am starting to feel even better then before. I hope this lasts, with the strengthening of my core muscles....below is exactly what RACK looks like :-) 

UPDATE #6:


Friday's work went well, and I feel pretty good this morning about going back to work this evening.   Thanks again for all your support !

You all have been great, bearing with me in all this.....


 
 
 
 
 

50 Replies

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lemonie (author)2009-10-01

Be sure of who's doing this, there are risks... L

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Lateral Thinker (author)lemonie2009-10-02

Before the op, ask the surgeon for his passport, thats to prevent a runner, in case he cripples you.

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-10-03

Nah, around here, the only runners besides those in sports, are in pantyhose

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-10-03

When they hit you on the head with a sledge hammer, minutes before the op, how will you stop your surgeon giving the job to a trainee? Like the captain of the 747 telling his copilot, you can land the plane. Only afterwards, did I discover my surgeon only supervised--- 3 operation's done by his registrars, all done at the same time. A registrar is a trainee! But it was okay, if I died on the table, it would be the surgeon that copped it from the authorities. Anyway, its safer that way, a registrar is fully trained, but still lacks one thing the surgeon has, thats over-confidence

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-10-03

they may do things like that there, but here, when I hire a surgeon to do an operation, he WILL do the operation (or the film later will be used to prosecute him).

one thing the surgeon has, thats over-confidence

He lacks another thing the surgeon has.....experience.

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-10-04

Have you not heard of operations done by untrained people? They mostly succeed, if not, there is a good excuse. Recently I had to complain about a health call centre, a rep there, every phone call is recorded for quality purposes, unless I ask for the recorder to be turned off. I did not. And apparently there was no recording. And apparently my email did not arrive. And certainly it did not bounce back. But the copy to the H&D; Commissioner did get thru. 2 months later the commissioner took action. Then the call centre responded. But a week after my email was supposedly lost, they did make changes, as I recognised that with my next call a few days later. 2 plus 2 does not equal 4 in this case. This call centre is a private company, under contract to our Ministry of Health. there is a neat story bout it, which I will post separately. How will you safe guard the film? The surgeon as well as being experienced with operations, would also be experienced with passing the buck, and excuses. With experience and confidence, the surgeon will also have found a experienced lawyer. But then Goodhart, if you dont wake up, you will never know.

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-10-04

Have you not heard of operations done by untrained people?

Yes, but in this country it is a bit rare. Many Doctors are close knit as a group; almost as close as the members of the Freemason's. Fraud's and the untrained are normally ferreted out fairly quickly...

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-10-04

I am talking about ops, such as might get done on the space station. Re-entry G for the lifeboat might be too high, the Russians might not have a shuttle going up, and would NASA have their shuttle ready in time, to take up a surgical team? And 1.5 Billion dollars for a house call? Like I said, you people in the USA, your doctors charge too much,

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-10-04

Over here, house calls are only done on very rare occasions. ;-)

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-10-04

Same here. But you will get a house call, for a doctor to sign a death certificate, if you die at home in bed.

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-10-05

Well, not the normal doctor though. He must be state certified for that particular function. The office is called the Coroner and not every doctor is one.

There is one time some doctors will go to a home as a home visit but that is normally only if the home is a Nursing Home and normally not one's house or apt.

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-10-05

I suppose you get house calls, if you are dieing, some people prefer dieing at home Your own GP can sign the certificate if its natural causes, I think the police too are involved, they see or know anything suspicious, then it has to go to the coroner. I suspect they rely on the professionalism of the GP, but if they see him signing too many, they might check up. We in NZ have yet to see any GP charged with mass murder, like in the UK.

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-10-05

I suppose you get house calls, if you are dieing, some people prefer dieing at home...

From either Hospice while alive or the State coroner, only afterwards. The MD will not come to the home if he is not an official Coroner.

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-10-05

you me, are members of the baby boom, meaning as we get older, there are less youngsters there to look after us with their services or money. (taxes) In NZ, the government is making a big issue re quality of life, saying old people much prefer dieing at home, so everything is done to keep people in their homes. The real story is, institutional care costs too much for the tax payers. Recently a 40 year old lady with Downs Syndrome went to the news media, she lived in supported accommodation, but when her medical needs became too much they stuck her in a old age home. She found it very bad, only old people around her, and they were consistently... Better to say, very often death certificates were needed. The Minister of Health said he was not amused. And her hospital district is stumped about better place for her

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-10-06

Here, many elderly would love to be home in their last days, but most younins will not tolerate the interference and so they are put away into homes.

My Dad died at home however, because he was NOT old. He had colon cancer and died at the age of 49, after fighting it for one year. Thankfully, he did not opt for FULL treatment, or he just would have been SICK that last year he was with us. Bedridden is not much of a life, but being constantly sick to the stomach is not hardly any kind of life at all. This was all about 31 years ago...

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-10-06

Elderly I am talking about live their own homes, and want to stay independent, refer the news item I sent you.

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-10-07

Except those that are unable to care for themselves,
are then moved to homes. If they can care for
themselves, no body puts them anywhere, why would
they?

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Goodhart (author)Goodhart2009-10-27
The expense here is great, and much easier for those capable of living on their own to continue to do so.
 

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God that sounds depressing.

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Goodhart (author)Kryptonite2009-10-13

<input type="hidden" id="gwProxy"><!--Session data--></input>Yes it does......sounds rather primitive too, now that you mention it....<input type="hidden" id="jsProxy" onclick="jsCall();" /><div id="refHTML"> </div>

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Kryptonite (author)Goodhart2009-10-13

Well considering they did brain surgery in the before the bronze age (successfully) it can't be too bad... Can it?

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Goodhart (author)Kryptonite2009-10-14

Well, to quote an old song........."<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7duPNQCp-w4">I think I'll(d) pass...</a>" :-) <div id="refHTML"> </div>

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Goodhart (author)lemonie2009-10-12

<input type="hidden" id="gwProxy"><!--Session data--></input>The second opinion, that I will be getting in a few hours, will be from a surgeon considered to be one of the top in the field in my area. :-) <input type="hidden" id="jsProxy" onclick="jsCall();" /><div id="refHTML"> </div>

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Goodhart (author)lemonie2009-10-01

Yes, I know. After I get my second opinion I will most likely be starting therapy first, and if this doesn't work, then the operation, and then therapy afterward.....*sigh* I have a doctor lined up that is supposed to be the best in the area.

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lemonie (author)Goodhart2009-10-02

Best wishes for it. Someone else in my office is due to have vertebrae fused or something, been heavily medicated for a long time now. L

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Goodhart (author)lemonie2009-10-02

Thank you. I wouldn't wish this kind of pain on my worst enemy; if I had one :-)

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lemonie (author)Goodhart2009-10-02

Well they think major surgery will be worth a shot, back pain can be severe, you've got my sympathy. L

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Goodhart (author)lemonie2009-10-02

In looking at what they would do for the two discs I have herniated, there would be no need for fusion, as a small portion of the disc would need to be removed to relieve the pressure on the spinal column itself, and that would be all at least this time around :-)

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Goodhart (author)2009-10-19

You all are the greatest.... <div id="refHTML"> </div>

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Goodhart (author)Berkin2009-10-15

First day of therapy....mostly questions and measurements....<br /><br /><div id="refHTML"> </div>

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Berkin (author)Goodhart2009-10-15

I was referring to pictures 3 and 4... XD

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Goodhart (author)Berkin2009-10-16

Yes, the very thing we are trying to avoid :-) <div id="refHTML"> </div>

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Goodhart (author)2009-10-12

<input type="hidden" id="gwProxy"><!--Session data--></input>Latest update: Therapy for about 3 weeks. :-) <input type="hidden" id="jsProxy" onclick="jsCall();" /><div id="refHTML"> </div>

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Molten Boron (author)Goodhart2009-10-13

And then what?
Hey, love the shirt.
If you're the king of pain, then I'm the Prince of...
uh...
Tickling.

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Goodhart (author)Molten Boron2009-10-13

<input type="hidden" id="gwProxy"><!--Session data--></input>THE King of Pain ;-) <input type="hidden" id="jsProxy" onclick="jsCall();" /><br /><br /><object height="344" width="425"><param value="http://www.youtube.com/v/0mgSCKXSp9M&hl=en&fs=1&" name="movie" /><param value="true" name="allowFullScreen" /><param value="always" name="allowscriptaccess" /><embed height="344" width="425" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/0mgSCKXSp9M&hl=en&fs=1&"></embed></object><div id="refHTML"> </div>

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Goodhart (author)2009-10-11

<input type="hidden" id="gwProxy"><!--Session data--></input> Things have improved a bit, thankfully. <input type="hidden" id="jsProxy" onclick="jsCall();" /><div id="refHTML"> </div>

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Tool Using Animal (author)2009-09-30

Thank your lucky stars you live in America, because with the exception of these few countries 1 France 2 Italy 3 San Marino 4 Andorra 5 Malta 6 Singapore 7 Spain 8 Oman 9 Austria 10 Japan 11 Norway 12 Portugal 13 Monaco 14 Greece 15 Iceland 16 Luxembourg 17 Netherlands 18 United Kingdom 19 Ireland 20 Switzerland 21 Belgium 22 Colombia 23 Sweden 24 Cyprus 25 Germany 26 Saudi Arabia 27 United Arab Emirates 28 Israel 29 Morocco 30 Canada 31 Finland 32 Australia 33 Chile 34 Denmark 35 Dominica 36 Costa Rica We have the finest health care in the world. Good luck Goodhart, feel better.

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Goodhart (author)Katarukito2009-10-01
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Katarukito (author)Goodhart2009-10-01

i was just wondering what it means to have bad/good healthcare

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lemonie (author)Katarukito2009-10-02

People can weigh in factors such as:
Death in childbirth (mothers & babies)
Life expectancy
Cancer survival rates
With the US it's certain that a lot of people have good healthcare, but there are huge numbers of people that don't and a large number of the unhealthily obese. It's things like this that drag the score down.

L

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Lateral Thinker (author)lemonie2009-10-02

I think NZ has the second or third highest in the world of obese people.

My researching leads me to believe the following,

NZ was inhabited by Europeans from a colder climate, and we still eat as if we lived in Europe. and we carry European genes too.= obesity.

The indigenous people, the Maori, converted to our diet. == obesity.

The Maori originally came here from Polynesia.

We have a lot of Pacific Islanders coming to live in NZ. They suffer from obesity. Their traditional feasts include pork, beef, high amounts of fatty food.

About 3-4 years ago, a researcher looked at very old sketches and paintings, and proved the traditional diet and feasts for Pacific Islanders was fish based.

Lots of obesity leads to a epidemic of diabetes, as we are having.

The Maori call the Europeans "Pakeha" and us Europeans use that name for ourselves too. In 1999, I learnt the Maori called us that, after the European discoverers of NZ (Abel Tasman or James Cook (can not recall which) introduced pigs to NZ. Pakeha apparently means "Pig"

Nowadays, people panic with flu epidemics, it can spread world wide, in a week before anybody is aware.

My point is, the smaller the world gets, the more we change it, the more health issues we cause.

The human race is fast making itself extinct.

No wonder NASA is in a hurry to get to Mars.

What do you do with a endangered species?

You relocate some members to a safe place, maybe an island after all the predators are exterminated.

But what do you when we are the predators of ourselves?

When you are young, you want to live forever, as you get older and wiser, you can not wait to get away from the mess we made of ourselves.

Youth is wasted on the young.!!!!

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user

I should add, back in the late '70s, I was supervisor of a small cannery here in NZ. We developed a new product for ourselves, as our Freezing Works had lots of beef off cuts, we set up a whole new production line to can Corned Beef. The formula (recipe) called for a lots more fatty corned beef than could be sold in NZ, because we intended exporting to the Pacific Islands. As the world gets smaller, that is what happens. A recent news item, was that Asians coming to study or live in NZ, 95% quickly become overweight.

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BTY, it is illegal to add phosphate to food. But adding phosphate to corned beef to as close as would be noticeable, caused the meat to soak up water. Less meat per can, more $$$ And I had to taste every batch, to check if the additives had been put in the tumbler with the meat. (same tumbler,used other days for paua)

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-10-03

In our industrialized country, it is nearly impossible to get fresh & ripe anything.

Even the produce section had to be picked early, and packaged and shipped to the stores, PLUS it has to sit there without going bad for a few days (up to 2 weeks). Nothing gets picked ripe unless it will be eaten within hours.

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-10-03

Bananas would not be so available except for the discovery of a certain gas. Bananas are always picked when green. Then weeks later, the day before the daily produce auction, a days worth is put in a room, sealed with plastic sheeting, and gassed for 24-hours. That triggered the ripening. My favourite banana, is one over ripe, but the produce supplier rarely gets it wrong, no more half price over ripe bananas

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-10-03

All our grocers carry BRIGHT green bananas unless they've been there for about a week, unbought

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-10-03

When are they going out of business? That's no way to run a business.

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-10-04

Been that way for decades now......the big grocers anyways.

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