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Physics concepts flash animations Answered

I stumbled on this site with all kinds of cool physics animations a few minutes ago. It has all sorts of animations illustrating physics concepts, from wave behavior to vectors to fluid mechanics to magnetism. It looks pretty cool. Some of the animations are more like just articles, and some are true animations.

Requires flash to run.

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Goodhart (author)2008-11-29

Very Cool. I will have to spend a little time in there, but the few I was able to get to now, are pretty well done. I love the Two Balls Gravity one as most would find that so unintuitive :-)

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kelseymh (author)Goodhart2008-11-29

Yup, sadly. Repeat after me -- perpendicular forces don't mix (that's short for orthogonal force vectors are decoupled :-). If you neglect air resistance, then throwing the ball (bullet, missile, Evel Knievel motorcycle) horizontally doesn't change how gravity pulls on it vertically.

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Goodhart (author)Lithium Rain2008-11-29

That is why he always attempted to aim upwards, erstwhile his landing would have had to be a platform significantly lower then his starting point. :-)

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Goodhart (author)kelseymh2008-11-29

yes, one's first thought is that the object is traveling a greater distance when started out horizontally, but the distance it travels to the ground is not longer. So one can reason it out...but it takes some thoughtfulness.

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kelseymh (author)2008-11-26

Very nice! I looked at the four QM ones, and they're pretty good. Bell's Theorem is just hard to explain, so there's a lot of verbiage on the slides, The "electron double slit" is just what I'm trying to write up now, for photons.

Thank you very much for finding and posting these, Adrian.

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Lithium Rain (author)kelseymh2008-11-26

You're welcome. Thought you might like it. ;) So they have the "Kelsey seal of approval"?

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kelseymh (author)Lithium Rain2008-11-27

Even better, it has the AAAS seal of approval :-)

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AAAS = Advancing Science. Serving Society

???

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. American Association for the Advancement of Science

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Kiteman (author)2008-11-27

Cool - bookmarked for school lessons!

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kelseymh (author)Kiteman2008-11-28

Hey, let me know what your students think of these (especially the mechanics and wave-mostion ones). Because I don't teach non-physicists, I don't have a good sense for how well these sorts of things get the ideas across to people who don't already know them.

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Lithium Rain (author)Kiteman2008-11-27

New patch idea-the I helped Kiteman with his job! patch. :D

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KentsOkay (author)2008-11-28

Awesome! Bit random but, how the HECK did you find this?

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Lithium Rain (author)KentsOkay2008-11-28

Well, it's in the Physics forums, so not quite that random. ;)

Yes, bumpus is correct-as I said, I stumbled on this site. (How to you make Stumble Upon into a verb, anyway? Just the way it sounds?)

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bumpus (author)KentsOkay2008-11-28

Stumble Upon.. I'm guessing.. ;-)

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Sunbanks (author)2008-11-27

I love websites like that! They're fun to play around with :D

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Masterdude (author)2008-11-27

I want to learn flash also for animations.

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Derin (author)2008-11-27

We need to learn flash too.(for the confidential project)

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