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Question about sanding wood Answered

Anybody have a tip on how to sand smooth many small discs of wood? Rather than do it all by hand with sanding paper I mean…
Is there a (cheap) sanding tool that I can purchase? Not something like the Dremel, Im thinking more about something with a flat sanding
surface.
Thanks anybody that will answer.

24 Replies

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Mindmapper1 (author)2015-06-24

what about using a tumbler?

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user

like stone tumbler but with scraps of sanding paper or an abraisive grit. Left running will soon smooth edges.

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Kiteman (author)marcellahella2015-06-25

https://www.instructables.com/howto/rock+tumbler/

It might work, but it will also round off edges (which may be a good thing or bad, depending on the final use).

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marcellahella (author)Kiteman2015-06-26

Yes, I don't want to round the edges too much. I think I will just buy the vertical disk sander, as soon as I decide myself to spend the money…

But did you ever use one electric belt sander http://www.ebay.it/itm/Silverline-Silverstorm-Powe...

Or heard about them, and know if they work well?

I attached a photo of what I need those sanders for.

Thanks.

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Kiteman (author)marcellahella2015-06-26

Those power files wouldn't be good for objects this size - you'll end up stripping the skin off your fingers.

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marcellahella (author)Kiteman2015-06-26

Not even the vertical disk sander? Or that one is fine?

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Sorry, my english is not very accurate, so I don't know if with "those power files" you meant the one on the link I posted, or in general you refer about all the power sander are not good for such small objects…

Anyways thank you for answering so many times!

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Kiteman (author)marcellahella2015-06-26

The thing you posted images of is a "power file". It is narrow, and hand-held, so is dangerous to use on small items.

The disc sander is much safer to use for small items, and is my personal recommendation for your requirements.

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killerjackalope (author)2015-06-27

Just a thought, I have no idea if it would work but if they're small enough to bounce about on the face of a normal sander and get an even sanding that way you might turn one upside down and add a cardboard collar to keep them from escaping.

I have no idea how that would work but it might, depending on the size of the workpieces.

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user

Thanks for the suggestion, but I think they are way too small for that...

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The smaller the better really, sort of thinking along the tumbler lines... By a normal sander I mean an oscillating one, they're the cheapest you can buy and the discs should only get sanded on their face from skittering about on the surface...

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bravoechonovember1 (author)2015-06-26

when I sand stuff in bulk I usually use a belt sander if you have new sand paper it sands pretty fast

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Downunder35m (author)2015-05-10

I have done a bit of wood working, especially on rifles and there is simply nothing that beats sanding by hand.
To do it properly you work directional with and against the grain.
Once pretty smooth you can use acedit acid to get the remaining wood fibres to stand up, a fine sand here gives a really smooth surface ready to be oiled.
Machine work works best if you can fix the disk somehow, either with clamps or in a rig allowing you to adjust the height for each disk.
IMHO you need quite a lot of wooden disk to justify the efford of making a sanding frame...

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user

Ok, thanks a lot for answering. That's what I was afraid of! I can't fix the discs because they are too flat and small (about 1/2"). But I ask you a question , I saw online some electric hand sanders, you think that if I take one and turn it upside down on a table, and then old with my hand on top a disc to sand it it will work? Or the electric hand sander move too much? I never used one so I'm not too sure about it, is just an idea…

Thanks for the acetic acid tip.

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user

Small wooden parts are a pain to sand in any case.
You can try the hand approach with an electrical sander but you would need to use fairly fine sand paper.
Do yourself a favour and get a non-slip mat, the one for kitchen use or to make sure nothing slides through your boot.
On a clean table it will hold your disk in place while sanding (you need a bit of pressure though).
You might have to rinse the mat under water after sanding a disk.

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Last question, did you or somebody ever saw this before, and know if it work? I was searching for vertical disc sander on ebay and did just come out: http://www.ebay.it/itm/Silverline-Silverstorm-Powe... I never see or know existed something like that, I was wondering about it…and if it can go all the way to a super smooth finish or not. Does it seems like a waste of money or a stupid machine?

I need to send the wood disc super smooth, they are already pretty flat after I cut them with the gig saw, but I just need to sand them a lot to make them shiny.

Thanks

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Kiteman (author)marcellahella2015-05-11

If you use an inverted disc sander or belt sander to sand small pieces, you're looking at losing fingertips. Gloves are worse, because they get dragged into the mechanism.

If you're going to use a power sander, use a vertical disc sander (see randomly-googled image) with proper safety guards in place. They can run a couple of hundred dollars new, but should be available second-hand (check Craigslist and Ebay). You can gently press the piece against the disc, and the base-plate will do the actual holding for you. You can even make a small jig or pushing stick to keep your fingers even further out of harm's way.

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marcellahella (author)Kiteman2015-05-11

Yes, that tool is what I wanted, I will look for one used around.

Thank you!

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sixsmith (author)2015-05-10

if they are the same diameter and, I'm guessing, you are just sanding the surfaces, you might be able to drill out a hole, slightly shallower than the shortest disk, in a board and get some wet/dry sandpaper and a plate of glass spray some water on the glass lay down the sand paper and use the block with hole as a handle.

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Kiteman (author)2015-05-10

Try laying them all in a shallow tray, then sand the whole lot at once.

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marcellahella (author)Kiteman2015-05-10

It would be a good idea, but they are all tall different ...

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