296Views6Replies

Author Options:

Should I use a remote-controlled solenoid to tip something over? Answered


Hi all,

I want to be able to remotely tip a model face over when my friend walks in the room (see attached photo). The face is made of cardboard and spray foam and is mounted on a piece of plywood that is hinged to the table.

Should i try to use a remote controlled solenoid to pull this gag off? Any better recommendations? It should be remote but I could probably hide a wire if there is a different and more reliable system.

All advice welcome!!!!

Thanks,

D

6 Replies

user
damianzuch (author)2011-05-21

Hi Lemonie,

I have it offset weighted, right where your blue rectangle is. It's just that initial push I need to get it started so that gravity will take over. How would you use an electromagnet to give it that push? Could I do this remotely?

Thanks!

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
Kiteman (author)damianzuch2011-05-21

(See the reply button?)

You could hide the electromagnet under the table, to pull a steel weight down, as long as the table isn't magnetic itself.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
damianzuch (author)Kiteman2011-05-21

Ah yes, the reply button! Are you familiar with a way to connect the electromagnet with a remote control? I was thinking solenoid because of Stuffman's remote door lock. (https://www.instructables.com/id/Build-a-Remote-Control-Deadbolt/)

The table is wood; I built it and it can be drilled, cut or modified in any way.

Can you tell me about electromagnets, especially those that I might use for this gag?

Many thanks!

D

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
Goodhart (author)damianzuch2011-05-21

If, however, you happen to have a solenoid "handy", it would have to be "embedded" into the table to hide it. Several ways of RC come to mind:
#1:  magnet wire run along the table edge, and down the leg and off under a rug or carpet.....you can use a simple push button then,
#2:  use an actual RC unit from a toy to "activate" the circuit much the same way it controls whatever it was originally made for,
#3: a thin steel wire in a routed out "trench" for manual moving of the object (pulleys if you need to be in the "opposite" direction from the object).

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
Kiteman (author)damianzuch2011-05-21

A solenoid *is* an electromagnet.

Depending on how finely you balance the head, it shouldn't take much of a magnet to do the job.

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer

user
lemonie (author)2011-05-21


You might  do this with a catch, or possibly an electromagnet.
If you weight it, it can "fall" upright.

L

Select as Best AnswerUndo Best Answer