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Swine flu (H1N1) vaccination Answered

Is any one thinking about getting the H1N1 vaccination.  They are offering it to us at work next week, along with the regular flu shot (one in each arm), I usually get the regular flu shot every year, but I'm wondering about the H1N1 vaccine.  I've heard some negative things about this vaccine, for example 'vaccine manufactures are granted immunity from lawsuits', this makes me nervous.

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Sunbanks (author)2009-11-25

I got it last Friday, and my arm hurt for a while afterwards, but it really wasn't that bad, compared to what could happen if I hadn't gotten it. 

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Goodhart (author)Sunbanks2009-11-25

I got it last Firday also.....was in the group of potential problem "children" :-)  I didn't feel a thing....and although I got a bit of a runny nose (and therefor a sinus headache) for about 6-8 hours, I "felt" nothing since.

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Sunbanks (author)Goodhart2009-11-25

I'm not sure if it was because of the vaccine or not, but I also had a little bit of a sore throat that night. 

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Goodhart (author)Sunbanks2009-11-25
My wife also complained of a bit of extra pain in that shoulder....and one other person's wife said the same thing....hmmmm, maybe it is not female friendly ?   LOL 
 

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Sunbanks (author)Goodhart2009-11-25

Haha maybe it isn't :P Or maybe... No that can't be it... I was going to say that maybe females say more about it hurting than guys do... :P

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Goodhart (author)Sunbanks2009-11-26
Hmm.   statistically (so I have read) females, no the average, tolerate pain better....but that is only on the average, so there are bound to be an anomaly or 3
;-) 
 

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Spl1nt3rC3ll (author)2009-11-25

 I don't see why everyone's freaking out about this. I got swine flu several weeks ago and it was just like any other sickness I've ever had. Better, even, because I never vomited. The only lasting repercussion was fatigue, that took a few more weeks to get over. I'm still feeling fatigued now, but I'm blaming it on school and insomnia. 

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 Still, I have to admit the sore throat bit was a pain. I couldn't even swallow melted ice cream.

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Goodhart (author)Spl1nt3rC3ll2009-11-25

That would bug me (since I love to eat :-) 

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Kiteman (author)2009-11-25

We haven't been offered the vaccine round here yet.

Roger-X and I have now both had it.

Not nice.  Seriously, not nice.  It's two weeks since it started, and Roger-X is still tired from it, and my immune system has been shot to hell so that I have ended up on two major antibiotics for what started as a very minor skin infection.  The antibiotics coincidentally flushed all the gut flora and fauna from my body, along with all other solid matter.  Today is my first solid meal since Sunday.  Yesterday, I managed cornflakes.

(As an aside, we both had Tamiflu, and neither of us suffered any ill effects from it.)

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ChrysN (author)Kiteman2009-11-25

Sounds awful!  I did in fact get the both (H1N1 and seasonal) flu shots two weeks ago.  I was fine, though the arm that got the H1N1 was sore for two days after.

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Rock Soldier (author)2009-11-25

I gotten the vaccine a few weeks ago, and I'm still perfectly fine.

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Wafflicious (author)2009-11-25

I got the shot 2 days ago.  I'm fine so far.

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gearhead1951 (author)2009-11-01

To me , It seems that when a bug bites me ,  th' bug dies !  I aint had more than a slight sore throat  or sniffles for th' past 20 odd yrs and I aint had a flu shot since I retired from th' navy in 1995 ( guess mayby my face scares 'em off !!)

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skunkbait (author)2009-10-29

Not a chance.  I never take the flu shot and have only had it once in the last 20 years.  I'd rather let my immune system deal with things as naturally as possible.  (I'm definitely not saying all meds are bad, but often they are much less effective, and occasionally much more dangerous, than we think.) 

Not to mention, from what I've read, the annual flu shots are not NEARLY as effective as the pharma companies would like you to believe.  Very often, the vaccines are not effective against the constantly mutating virus.

I'll just eat fruit and veggies, wash my hands, and not kiss any sneezers.  And, if I actually get the H1n1, then that's one more disease I'll likely develop a resistance to. 

I trust big-pharma about as much as I trust politicians.......

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caitlinsdad (author)skunkbait2009-10-29

I'm around a few hypochondriacs and at the first sneeze or cough they go running to the anti-biotics like they''re Altoids mints. I try to stay away from them as they are the ones mutating the viruses and getting sick more often.  Like the coach says, "Go walk it off."   I've been in some doctor's offices where there are more pharmaceutical salespeople in the waiting room than patients lining up to see the doctor for the chance to push more pills.  Flu shots didn't help when Bird Flu spread and we still have to worry about all those other nasty viruses like West Nile or Legionnaire's Disease which there are no vaccines.  Life is one big gamble.

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skunkbait (author)caitlinsdad2009-10-29

Yep.  There are things we can do to keep our immune systems healthy, but over-medicating is not one of them. 

I've had some bad stuff: Malaria (at least 12 times), Dengue, Giardia,  Rocky Mtn Spotted Fever, Tularemia (Rabbit Fever), and Staph.  I was thankful for the treatment I recieved.  Might've even died without it..... 

But my friends who always use antibacterial soap, boil their drinking water (even for ice),  take every imaginable vaccine and get antibiotics everytime the get a little uncomfortable, ,,, they ALWAYS seem to get a cold/flu every season.  I certainly haven't taken the time to do the math/science behind it, but I'll stick with what's worked so far for me.

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Goodhart (author)skunkbait2009-10-30
technically, flu shots aren't "medication", but a way to get the flu, be immunized against it, and yet not become "sick" and also not be able to spread it (since you won't actually "get" it).      

I am always dubious, and didn't have flu shots for YEARS, and only ever had the flu once.....BUT, after the heart surgery, it became nearly mandatory, and seemingly very wise to get them.    This is the second year in a row I have gotten the "regular" flu shot.....as soon as it is available to me (which may be quite awhile yet) I will get the H1N1 vaccination(s) too.
One relative I know, who is a big believer in conspiracy theories galore stated "but they stay in you FOREVER!"     and my reply was,  so will the immunity if you survive the actual FLU, but it won't be just a little jab; you'll have to be sick for a week to get the immunity that way.   I wonder why he doesn't invite me over much anymore?   ;-)  
 

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Kiteman (author)skunkbait2009-10-30

Maybe you have different flu jabs over there.

Over here, they are very effective.  The problem is, as you say, the seasonal flu mutates (which is why you need an annual jab to catch up on the latest strains - you really are updating your virus protection), so what they actually give you is a cocktail of vaccines against the strains you are most likely to encounter.

(Never, ever believe an advert from a pharmacorp.  Advertising to the general public is illegal in the UK; they're only allowed to advertise to people trained to see through the spin.  I strongly recommend the Bad Science column.  There's a book as well, which completely takes pharmacorp strategies to pieces.)

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DJ Radio (author)2009-10-29

I won't take the vaccine because I already had swine flu, so I'm already immune to it.

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DJ Radio (author)ChrysN2009-10-30

Not that bad, the worst was that I was dizzy at the doctor's office.

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Creativeman (author)2009-10-29

I absolutely will refuse to take this vaccine.  For two reasons: 1. I get sick every time I would take a shot; 2. I don't trust the propaganda behind this vaccine, as well as the others. Anything with this much controversy behind it must be questioned. This is my stance, my opinion on this subject. As an ex-medical professional, it may or may not carry additional weight. I use the following test: If I never get on another airplane, I am never going to die in an airplane crash. Cman

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skunkbait (author)Creativeman2009-10-29

I'M WITH YOU C'MAN.  

-FIrst, how likely am I to get H1N1?
-Second, How likely am I to die from it?
-Are the H1N1 vaccines effective?
-Are some of them tainted?
-How likely am I to get  adverse effects from the H1N1vaccine?

I'll take my chances and stick with fruit, veggies, and exercise.  A year or so from now, history will tell us who was wise, and who was following bad advice.

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Creativeman (author)skunkbait2009-10-30

Your plan makes more sense to me than most of the others here. A year is not enough time, however, as some unseen, unintended consequences may not show up for decades.  Why risk it?  To each his own.  Like Jessy says: Truth. Cman

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Kiteman (author)skunkbait2009-10-30

-FIrst, how likely am I to get H1N1?
>Unknown, but if somebody you have been in close quarters with (such as sneezing in the same queue) has it, quite likely.

-Second, How likely am I to die from it?
> Relatively unlikely, but a growing number of people are ending up on heart-lung machines while they wait for their lungs to heal and start working again.  These machines are very limited in number - if they are all in use when you need one, you die.

-Are the H1N1 vaccines effective?
> So far.
-Are some of them tainted?
> No.

-How likely am I to get  adverse effects from the H1N1vaccine?
> About as likely as you are to suffer from a normal flu jab (ie possibly three or four days of aches and cold symptoms).

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Kiteman (author)Creativeman2009-10-29

Even though you may not be on the plane, that doesn't stop you being killed when it crashes into the building where you work.

As an ex medical professional, you should realise that advising against vaccination is, at best, irresponsible.

You cannot rely on herd immunity to protect you.

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Creativeman (author)Kiteman2009-10-29

Huh?  cmon kman, it's my opinion regardless of your dubious assessment. Maybe medical professionals should all be questioned more (and be responsible for their beliefs) I am, and who made you judge? Cman

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Gjdj3 (author)Creativeman2009-10-29

First of all, I'm curious as to what type of medical professional you were. Second, speaking against vaccines is worse than irresponsible; it is downright dangerous. It's attitudes like yours that cause diseases to be spread so much more easily.

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Gjdj3 (author)2009-10-28

GET THE VACCINE! The misinformation being spread about this shot drives me crazy.

To the people who say it's too new, and has not been tested:
It has been tested just as much as the "normal" flu vaccine. Let me repeat, It has been tested just as much as the normal flu vaccine. Flu vaccines are made every year for the specific strains going around in a given season. The only reason the H1N1 virus was not included in the "normal" shot was because they didn't know it would be necessary until two months after the "normal" shot went into production. That was why there was a two month delay on the H1N1 vaccine.

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Gjdj3 (author)Gjdj32009-10-28

Also, I would suggest getting both shots in one arm (preferably your non-dominant one). Your arm is going to be sore no matter how many shots are in it. I would want at least one of my arms to be at 100%.

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Sunbanks (author)2009-10-28

They're giving it to us at school soon... 

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caitlinsdad (author)2009-10-28

It'll still be a few weeks before we hear about the vaccination given out to schoolkids but I swore off the regular flu shot after one year I got really sick despite the shot.  It's a tough choice, healthcare workers in NYC went to court to bar mandatory H1N1 shots.

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ChrysN (author)caitlinsdad2009-10-28

I work in a hospital and although they can't force us to get a flu shot, they may make us stay home from work without pay if there is a major outbreak in the hospital.

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