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Text onto soda can Answered

I'm trying to apply some text onto the material from a soda can, but I don't have the neatest handwriting and it's not even meant to be a normal font. What are some good ways to apply some guidance for me when I go to actually scribe onto the material?

The end result I'm aiming for is a box similar to this one;
https://www.instructables.com/id/Drink-Can-Tinwork/
but with the Sith Creed written in one of the Star Wars fonts, and most of the visible work being done by a dremel.

I've thought about making a stencil, but I'm not sure I can reasonably cut some of those shapes at the necessary size.
Toner transfer may be an option, but I am not too familiar with that process.

5 Replies

user
madmedix (author)2015-11-16

Actually, search it on make: and you'll find an article by Sean Michael Regan on using one of the old hand embossers with soda can aluminum..

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Downunder35m (author)2015-11-12

You get blue stencil foil that is activated by UV light.
So you printwhat you like on the foil, develop it in the sun for a few minutes and you are left with a thin pieve of plastic containing your writing.
But if you want to use a dremel anyway I would just print on normal paer, use a glue that dissolves in water and grind through the paper.

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gmoon (author)2015-11-12

Carbon paper might work. Print your design on an inkjet, transfer to can with the carbon paper. Go over that with a Sharpie if it's faint. Emboss.

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Bobmonkey07 (author)gmoon2015-11-12

do you mean print directly on the carbon paper, or print on another sheet and attatch them to scribe together?

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gmoon (author)Bobmonkey072015-11-12

Try printing to regular paper, then taping a sheet of carbon paper to the back of that. Trace the design my hand; it should transfer.

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