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We are NOT emotionless: EDITED>>> This article fits me well - GH Answered

Picture of
http://specialchildren.about.com/od/booksonaspergersyndrome/gr/allcatshaveAS.htmIn May of this year, a study has shown that Asperger's "sufferers" do not LACK emotions, but are rather "overcome by the extreme intensity of the emotions they feel and experience". 

"A groundbreaking study suggests people with autism-spectrum disorders such as Asperger's do not lack empathy – rather, they feel others' emotions too intensely to cope.

People with Asperger's syndrome are often stereotyped as distant loners or robotic geeks. But what if what looks like coldness to the outside world is a response to being overwhelmed by emotion – an excess of empathy, not a lack of it?"


The article can be found at Asperger's Theory does an about face

 "HERE is another link to look at !

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Wasagi (author)2009-12-28

 I feel like kids in pre-high school get so much crap because of having Asbergers. I mean, you can't help it, and people only really know how to deal with it around high school.

Do all cats really have asbergers?

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Goodhart (author)Wasagi2009-12-28
I know, it is a real irritant until one is around a more mature group, sadly.

No, that poster (or calendar front page)  was just put in for some lightheartedness.    Although, they DO seem to act like it, don't they? :-) 
 

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Kryptonite (author)Goodhart2009-12-29

The book www.bookworm.com.au/Book/All-Cats-Have-Asperger-Syndrome-9781843104810.aspx All Cats Have Asperger Syndrome is a truly wonderful book describing the aspects of life with Asperger Syndrome, illustrated with lovable cats depicting each seperate trait.

If you have not read it, I highly reccomend you do.

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Goodhart (author)Kryptonite2009-12-31
I have it and have read it......the only thing that doesn't really apply to me at this point in my life is on pages 13-14:  about food pickiness.  I was once a bit bit picky about food, but  when I turned 20, some things happened to change me into wanting to be more adventurous with foods. 

Other then that, it is a cute and accurate book.  Thanks.   I will have to see if anyone in my area, like family, would like to borrow it, if they want to know more about it but not have to wade through mounds of scientific data that I would most likely shovel their way :-) 
 

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Kryptonite (author)Goodhart2010-01-03

Well I hope you have liked it, it's a wonderful book.

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Goodhart (author)Kryptonite2010-01-03
Yes, it is nice for helping others to see what it's all about without having to give them a mound of data they won't wade through anyways.

The one I mentioned on Asperger's and Anxiety, is going to be my next one however, as I need something to replace the Lexipro that presently keeps my anxiety (and much of my imagination) under lock and key.

Hopefully I will be able to learn to deal with it instead of medicate it, in other words.
 

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Kryptonite (author)Goodhart2010-01-03

Make the best of what you've got, instead of trying to cure it.

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Goodhart (author)Kryptonite2010-01-04
Well, medication in this case is not a cure, but a quick (and maybe lazy) way to avoid the problem.   I don't feel the desire to do that anymore (at expense of my other faculties).

   Sure, we can relieve the cough when we have a cold, but if the cough is productive, it may be doing good;  sometimes it's best not to relieve the cough...
 

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Kryptonite (author)Goodhart2010-01-04

I personally hate any and all tablets, and I only take them when it's either disrupting partying with friends or essential work.

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Goodhart (author)Kryptonite2010-01-04

and lately at work, they tell us to stay home if we have anything; so afraid they are of a company-wide epidemic :-) 

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Kryptonite (author)Goodhart2010-01-05

That's gonna make it hard if you're feeling a bit crook. What profession are you in?

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Goodhart (author)Kryptonite2010-01-05
I work with the computers at night, operations, LAN troubleshooting, along with the mainframe, etc.....they are less strict with me since I am on the second shift, and everyone else is on a first shift (literally everyone else).
 

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Kryptonite (author)Goodhart2010-01-07

Sometimes every one being way too sterile is just way too much in my opinion.

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Goodhart (author)Kryptonite2010-01-07
Well, I can see it during the day....if you can imagine 120+ employees streaming video, etc. not only cuts into production time, but would cripple the system to the point that someone looking at our site or an agent getting an online quote, may look elsewhere if the system were slow enough. :-)
 

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Goodhart (author)Goodhart2010-01-07
PS:  many "users" tend to just click on anything.....we get virus' now and then from those that want the world on a silver platter and for free too ;-) 
 

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Kryptonite (author)Goodhart2010-01-08

Yes, simple precautions can really make a difference as to what you get. I'm still not sure how I crashed my mum's operating system.

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Goodhart (author)Kryptonite2009-12-29
Thank you.  I am also looking into this one too hopefully soon: 

 Asperger's & Anxiety


 

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Goodhart (author)Kryptonite2009-12-29
COOL !   Thank you.
 

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Wasagi (author)Goodhart2009-12-28

 Yeah, although, It's more that window in between 1st grade and 9th-ish, because younger people don't really notice.

I like the picture though! The do...

Although my friend's cat is really good at High-Fiving! Or she was trying to eat my hand...

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skunkbait (author)2010-01-08

Interesting article.  It makes sense.  I can definitely understand avoidance as a coping mechanism for those who are apt to over-empathize.  I have a tendancy to take others' misery upon myself (when normal folks would not), and it does make life a bit difficult.

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Goodhart (author)skunkbait2010-01-09
It does indeed make things very difficult at times; especially when any stress is involved.    Lately, now that I am becoming more "aware" of why I have some serious meltdowns now and then during periods of inner stress, I have (hopefully only temporarily) have been having more.   The absolute frustration I am feeling from inside my own home has literally driven me to seek sanction at work, where I sometimes get calls from home extending that frustration even into my inner sanctum as it were.

The other book I mentioned, 

Asperger Syndrome and Anxiety: A Guide to Successful Stress Management

is definitely a great book and I highly recommend it to any Aspie suffering from acute (or even ugly)  anxiety.





 

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Doctor What (author)2010-01-07

Hmmmmm.....  I have all of the characteristics..... But I've never heard of it before. 

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Goodhart (author)Doctor What2010-01-07
Have you tried the test....link is at the Group site
 

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Doctor What (author)Goodhart2010-01-07


Your Aspie score: 183 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 22 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie

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Goodhart (author)Doctor What2010-01-07
Yeah, I had heard of it before, but never really thought about it much....and no one felt I should be tested until recently .
 

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Doctor What (author)Goodhart2010-01-08

Have you been professionally diagnosed?

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Goodhart (author)Doctor What2010-01-08
Not yet as I want to make sure the local Doc is completely qualified to diagnose it in adults.  As one gets older, one can and does adapt and adopt behavior that may be completely contraindicative of the syndrome, despite it's presence.
 

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Doctor What (author)Goodhart2010-01-08

I've noticed a few symptoms which I have had as a child, but have gone away, or completely reversed.

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=SMART= (author)2009-12-27

Can you have a degree of aspergers? like have it a little bit but not full blown syndrome.

haha that cat says "hay! i dont have aspergers dammit"

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Goodhart (author)=SMART=2009-12-27
Yes, there is an entire "spectrum" so to speak.  There are the Einstein's and Edison's and Mozarts of the world, and then there are those that become masters of Astronomy, and some master chef's some have become super visionaries, etc. 

The world needs people with Asperger's Syndrome....
 

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-12-27

There are the Einstein's and Edison's and Mozarts of the world, and then there are those that become masters of Astronomy, and some master chef's some have become super visionaries, etc.

And then there is me and Goodhart!

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-12-28
Yeah, well I haven't found my niche yet.....I am interested in too many things ;-) 
 

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-12-28

I never liked the saying "Jack of all trades and master of none"

Because when I was working, I found specialists have VERY limited abilities, while I put together knowledge from a number of trades and GOT THINGS DONE!


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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-12-28
Not only that, but knowledge in a cross-section helps understand the "whole picture" rather then trying to analyze a Van Gogh  one pixel at a time ;-)

It is one of the reasons I am enthralled by the concepts of the Science of Emergence. 
 

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-12-28

Who would NASA hire, to pilot the first lander to Mars?

A specialist pilot?

Or a Aspie jack of all trades, who can find the blown fuse for the ignition system for the return  stage, and make a new fuse from a 6 inch nail?

BTW, when Apollo 11's lander was getting ready to lift off from the moon for the return trip, the crew found they had broken off the lever for the circuit breaker to arm the lift off rocket.

Luckily a ball-point-pen was all that was needed to reset that circuit breaker.

And luckily they did not have to get out and open the bonnet, as they had already tossed out the door their EVA back packs.

Peter

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-12-29
Let's not forget Apollo 13, 'nuf said.
 

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-12-29

One of the first NASA moon landers (Ranger series?) went out of action when the lander separated from its launcher rocket.

Why?

The power connector between the lander and rocket was a prong and socket affair. And the prongs were on the LANDER side. When the connector separated, some aluminium heat shielding short circuited the prongs and zapped the lander.

The engineers that thought of that, every day came across live mains power sockets, into which you stuck pronged plugs to power appliances.

Could an Aspie have got it right first time? Aspies look for detail in things around them at the expense of social signals from people around them.

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-12-29

Oh quite possilby.....I am ALWAYS catching errors that the managers and programmers introduce to my nightly schedules that "just won't work". 

I have been thinking about odd sayings lately (not to change the subject or anything), and someone recently cited the "devil is in the details" one...and I quipped back:  So, does that mean that it takes an Aspie to defeat the devil?   :-) 

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Lateral Thinker (author)Goodhart2009-12-29

But a Aspie first needs to check, does the Devil exist, or is it just a figment of the boss's imagination?

Could you not write a super admin prgram, to do everything on your nightly schedule, then go to sleep?

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Goodhart (author)Lateral Thinker2009-12-29

Well, Biblically, the "devil" is defined as the tempter, and James tells us the tempter is our OWN thoughts and desires.....making each person their own "devil" as it were.   

 

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Goodhart (author)Goodhart2009-12-27
But not all become "super" at something, either.
 

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