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What the Candidates Say About Energy Answered

What the Candidates Say About Energy
http://www.energycentral.com/centers/news/daily/article.cfm?aid=9641919

Republicans
RUDY GIULIANI: Says "every potential solution" must be pursued, including nuclear power, increased energy exploration and more aggressive investment in alternative energy sources. Says energy independence can be achieved through a strategy that emphasizes diversification, innovation and conservation.

MIKE HUCKABEE: Wants to lessen U.S. dependence on foreign oil by pursuing "all avenues" of alternative energy: nuclear, wind, solar, hydrogen, clean coal, biodiesel and biomass.

JOHN MCCAIN: Wants to limit carbon dioxide emissions "by harnessing market forces" that will bring advanced technologies, such as nuclear energy, to the market faster. Seeks to reduce dependence on foreign supplies of energy. Wants the U.S. to lead in a way that ensures all nations "do their rightful share" on the environment. As you may know,McCain was AWOL in December on the key Senate vote to secure an 8-year
Solar Investment Tax Credit extension -- and he could have been the hero by casting the 60th
vote (it failed 59 to 40 with only McCain being AWOL).

MITT ROMNEY: Wants to accelerate construction of nuclear power plants as part of a "robust, cleaner and reliable energy mix." Seeks energy independence not by halting all oil imports but by "making sure that our nation's future will always be in our hands."

Democrats
HILLARY CLINTON: Says she's "agnostic" about building nuclear power plants. Prefers renewable energy and conservation because of concerns about nuclear power's cost, safety and waste disposal. Wants to spend $150 billion over the next 10 years to cut oil imports by two-thirds from 2030 projected levels, with some money going toward alternative energy.

JOHN EDWARDS: Opposes nuclear power because of cost and safety concerns. Favors creating a $13 billion-a-year fund to finance research and development of energy technologies; wants to reduce oil imports by nearly a third of the oil projected to be used in 2025.

BARACK OBAMA: Says the U.S. can't meet its climate goals if it removes nuclear power as an option but says such issues as security of nuclear fuel, waste and waste storage need to be addressed first. Wants to spend $150 billion over the next 10 years to develop new energy sources. Seeks to reduce
"oil consumption overall by at least 35 percent by 2030."

25 Replies

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KentsOkay (author)2008-02-08

I'm personally pulling for Giuliani, McCain, and Ron Paul. I also feel focus should be placed on fusion energy.

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Patrik (author)KentsOkay2008-02-10

Fusion energy will take at least another 30-50 years to become economically feasible - pretty much all fusion energy researchers agree on that. I don't think we can afford to wait that long...

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Doctor What (author)KentsOkay2008-02-09
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Doctor What (author)2008-02-08
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KentsOkay (author)Doctor What2008-02-08

And I thought you were a decent person! =: ' (=

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Doctor What (author)KentsOkay2008-02-09

That's weird, I thought the same of you! Hmph, Republicans (grumble, grumble, grumble). You would think that a scientist wouldn't be republican, but I guess you can never tell. :P :)

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KentsOkay (author)Doctor What2008-02-09

Political parties (grumble, grumble) we are however a republic.

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Weissensteinburg (author)2008-02-08

CNN has a really good section of their site devoted to listing the candidates and their views on everything.

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user

Isn't CNN very biased. I thought they were very liberal.

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user

That shouldn't change a candidates views on certain subjects.

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user

True, but CNN could filter what they want on their website, and glorify the Democrats over the Republicans.

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trebuchet03 (author)Doctor What2008-02-09

You're ahead of the game by recognizing mainstream media sources as biased.... That doesn't change your ability to recognize mainstream media sources as biased while reading it ;) I tend to use votesmart.org anyway :)

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user

the problem with votesmart is this: "Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton repeatedly refused to provide any responses to citizens on the issues through the 2008 Political Courage Test when asked to do so by national leaders of the political parties, prominent members of the media, Project Vote Smart President Richard Kimball, and Project Vote Smart Vote Smart staff."

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user

I wouldn't call it a problem (see below). What's important on there is voting record, education background, professional background, finances, speeches/public statements, endorsements, committees, and interest group ratings. Hell, research does involve some searching :) If someone doesn't want to - they can feel free to accept the mostly garbage crap from mainstream media (not just political either :p). Votesmart just happens to put a lot of good resources in one place and does quite a bit of legwork :)

Interestingly with the interest group ratings - while it's not necessarily the best metric - it can be useful if your views are aligned with any of the listed groups. Groups ranging from the NRA to the Sierra Club etc..

The same exact thing for:

Senator Barack H. Obama Jr. repeatedly refused to provide any responses to citizens on the issues through the 2008 Political Courage Test when asked to do so by national leaders of the political parties, prominent members of the media, Project Vote Smart President Richard Kimball, and Project Vote Smart Vote Smart staff.

Senator John Sidney McCain III repeatedly refused to provide any responses to citizens on the issues through the 2008 Political Courage Test when asked to do so by national leaders of the political parties, prominent members of the media, Project Vote Smart President Richard Kimball, and Project Vote Smart Vote Smart staff.

Michael D. 'Mike' Huckabee repeatedly refused to provide any responses to citizens on the issues through the 2008 Political Courage Test when asked to do so by national leaders of the political parties, prominent members of the media, Project Vote Smart President Richard Kimball, and Project Vote Smart Vote Smart staff.

None of the candidates really do it... Nor:
Representative Ronald Ernest 'Ron' Paul repeatedly refused to provide any responses to citizens on the issues through the 2008 Political Courage Test when asked to do so by national leaders of the political parties, prominent members of the media, Project Vote Smart President Richard Kimball, and Project Vote Smart Vote Smart staff.

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user

But I want to know exactly what each president would like to do if they became president. It's hard to figure out what exactly a candidate thinks about concealed carrying and abortion other things. And voting records aren't much use, because you can't get any specifics about each view.

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user

Wha?

Voting record clearly has the past record (for those already in office). Don't know what the bill was? There's a link with explanation.

There's even a "Issue Positions" section under speeches/public statements that pulls the keynotes from the candidate websites.

In Clinton's case - want to know about abortion? Search for abortion under speeches/statements. The first thing that comes up - as stated on 1/22/08 is:
She believes the right to privacy is a fundamental right, and that abortion should be safe, legal, and rare.

McCain:
I support amendment No. 2708 that would prevent contributions to organizations that perform or promote abortion as a method of family planning. I was unable to be in attendance for this vote. However, if I had been present, I would have voted in favor of this amendment.

I'm not sure how much more specific than a direct statement one can get... Other than perhaps going to a campaign rally and asking in person (I've done this - pulled a political stunt - got on a national news broadcast for it - it was fun) :)

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user

Oh, and on voting record: You can either vote yes or no, not somewhere in between, where their views may lie.

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user

But see, on CNN you can either see every candidates view on a particular subject on one page, or a particular candidate's view on each subject on one page. And for most of them, they've got links to them speaking or talking about each thing.

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user

The easiest/fastet solution doesn't qualify it as the best solution ;) I rate quality over speed when it comes to most forms of information :) While votesmart doesn't have links to them speaking... It does have links to their transcripts - unabridged and without commentary (ever). I can read faster than they can talk, so it works out better :p Plus I don't have to wait for a video :D In any case - I personally don't see an issue with a few extra clicks to compare one candidate to another. Why? Because I'm not comparing one to another (somehow, the media got us into comparing rather than deciding if one candidate is the right choice for you). Even if I was comparing - I've got no problem remembering what position the other candidates had while I look up what the other person's position is :)

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zachninme (author)trebuchet032008-02-09

Heh, we have to take some research course, in which we learn about bias. There was a slideshow that was put together, and it was so hypocritical, it pissed me off. The teacher took a quote from a wikipedia article, on George Bush. If I recall, the biased part was something along the lines of "he was the last person to learn to fly this aircraft" She then took a quote from some other online encyclopedia, that she noted that people could edit, but only those who were allowed. She then noted that nothing about being the last was mentioned. I can name quite a few things wrong with this. For one, not mentioning it is still bias, its just a different one. Next, that article is protected, so not everyone can edit it. These, and a few other points, made me loose all faith in her as a teacher.

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trebuchet03 (author)2008-02-09

What? No Tony Clifton? His policy would probably involve some sort of bigoted pun, a cigar and some scantily clad women. Clifton08!

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Brennn10 (author)2008-02-08

As long as the president supports an environmental friendly mindset, I am all for him/her. They just have to have a better sense of the environment more than our current president.

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Labot2001 (author)2008-02-08

CHUCK FOR HUCK!!! :] I'm going with Huckabee on this one.

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