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Where to find a scorpion? Answered

 I live in Arizona and have been looking in my backyard for scorpions but I can't find any!
What are some scorpion finding tips?

19 Replies

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paganwonderBest Answer (author)2010-03-25

Most scorpions in Arizona are nearly invisible in daylight- if a black-light is available try at night.  This time of year look under rocks and branches (or a wood pile) in the early morning.  The "bark" of palm trees will also yield the nasty little buggers but I strongly suggest heavy gloves when searching there because you'll probably find one on the back of your hand!

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Mothermushroom (author)2018-03-09

Use the black light at night. Carry a broom handle or stick with a wad of duct tape sticky side out and daub up the scorpion. Dispose of said critter as you wish. Under a heavy work pot works great.

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MianA1 (author)2018-01-26

I am from pakistan and want to have scorpions where i can find them and after finding how to feed them means what they eat and how to enhance their quantity

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dragonfathom (author)2010-03-27

You should check under rocks, under bark, or possibly even set traps. Also, as people have said, blacklights are the best bet.

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user

how would i set a trap for them

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acidbass (author)2010-03-31

 go out at night with a black light and look near rocks and things they can fin shelter in i live in texas and we do it all the time

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acidbass (author)2010-03-25

buy a blacklight and go out at night and they glow because of the acid in the poison make them glow under a blacklight

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user

Not quite. The glow is due to a protein found in the chitin of the exoskeleton, not the venom. This can be demonstrated by the fact that a freshly molted scorpion doesn't glow until the new shell hardens, but the old shell retains the glow.

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user

oh cool thanks you proved my pest control guy wrong (we live in texas and he said what I said)

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RavingMadStudios (author)2010-03-24

My in-laws' front porch in Green Valley is a great place to find them.
Seriously, though... Get a portable blacklight and go out at night. Scorpions glow under black light.

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user

It's true.  They do fluoresce when illuminated by UV.  The one in the attached pictures is a pet, er captive.  In its former life it was running free in my basement.

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user

Cute bug. Does it have a name? If I had a captive scorpion, I'd name it Mittens.

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user

Somehow I never got around to giving this scorpion a name.  I think that's because I wasn't expecting it to live very long, and I guess I didn't want to get too "attached" to it.   This is also true of all the other bugs that get scooped up off the floor and dumped into this terrarium, e.g. crickets, a beetle of some kind, a few pill bugs.  They don't have names either. 

Although, I have to admit, "Mittens" is a good name for a scorpion.

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user

I didn't know about using a black light.  Jack's photo really shows that well.  His is the same kind we have in Texas.

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Jack A Lopez (author)Re-design2010-03-25

I think it's a Centruroides vittatus.
 
Take a look at picture/info on this page:
http://animal-world.com/encyclo/reptiles/scorpions/StripedScorpion.php

And see if this also looks like the scorpions your back yard.

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Re-design (author)Jack A Lopez2010-03-25

Looks like it to me.  Mine were colored similar but duller.  Probably the just area they came from.

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user

I learned about the UV thing from Animal Planet, and just thought it was cool. Apparently, when they molt the discarded shell retains the luminescent property. Makes me think there's some sort of application to be found there, but IDK what it is.

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onrust (author)2010-03-24

Here in Phoenix, I find LOTS in water meter boxes.

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Re-design (author)2010-03-24

Rock piles, wood piles, under leaves.  Similar places you might find a small rattle snake so be wary.

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