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Which type of diode for 12v 10amp to 12v 0 amp? Answered

Hi all, wondering if you can offer any advice,

I'm making a circuit that has two sub circuits:-

circuit 1
10 amp transformer, connected to lights

circuit 2
6 amp transformer, connected to lights

Both these sub circuits will be bridged to  a large circuit , however  I believe I need a diode that will stops the 6 amp transformer getting to circuit 1, but the transformer from circuit 1 to power the lights in circuit 2.

If this is correct could someone advise that type of diode I would need to drop the amps to 0. I'm not sure how diodes work however I'm using led lighting that will run off 5v so I'm aiming to have as close to a one way valve for power.

Also will I have to place a diode on both the positive and negative or will one surface?

Thanks for any help you can offer

Tags:diode

8 Replies

user
C2L (author)2015-06-11

Sorry, I forgot to explain the case why its needed!

the basic need is that circuit 1 powers lights internal to the house, circuit 2 being outside lighting.

The 240v mains to circuit 2 will have a PIR connected to it so when there is outside movement i wish for only circuit 2 to be live.

However if the Circuit 1 transformer is turned on, I wish to have power going to circuit 2.

i'll try and get a get a diagram up tomorrow if it makes it easier to understand.

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user
steveastrouk (author)C2L2015-06-11

So everything is running on AC ?

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user
C2L (author)steveastrouk2015-06-12

240V AC in to the transformers, 12V DC out.

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user
steveastrouk (author)2015-06-09

I think you need to post a sketch of what you have and what you want.

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user

I think the author has a slight lack of understanding the electronic and electrical side of things.
Considering his LED lights need 5V most of the energy from the transformers will be wasted to heat.
Best solution would be to buy a dedicated 5V supply for the job or to use an old PC power supply.

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user
C2L (author)Downunder35m2015-06-11

forgot to add the LEDS are 12v DC however they will still light but at 5v

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user
Wired_Mist (author)steveastrouk2015-06-09

+1

Any reason why the two circuits need to be separate?

If there are the same voltage they can safely share the current. I see no reason to keep the two circuits separate. #confuzzled If anything I would buy a 16Amp transformer !

Do you mean you want to put a switch on each Circuit?

Or are you using two diffenert Voltages?

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user
mpilchfamily (author)2015-06-09

No need for a diode.

Assuming your working with AC. Make sure the neutral wire is shared by both circuits. You'll want to use a SPDT switch. 10A circuit going to one side, 6A going to the other side of the switch and the line out to the lamp on the center pin of the switch.

Zero amps will mean the lights are off. If you need to be able to turn the lights off then cut the power to both transfomrers with a switch.

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