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Wisdom Teath and any other Sugery Answered

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So I have to get all four of my wisdom teeth removed this Friday at 7am (tomorrow), and to make it worse we have Friday off of school. But I wanted to get it done before the holidays (TURKEY!!). So any horror story's (of any surgery doesn't have to be wisdom teeth)? How old were you when you got yours out (I'm 14)? Did you even have them removed? BTW: There putting me under (anesthesia) if you were wondering.

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Kiteman (author)2007-11-09

I have weak teeth, which splinter easily (I broke one on a potato chip!), so I've lost a fair bit of chewing surface - second molar and backwards gone at the bottom, both sides, third molar and back at the top, both sides. And as type I am doped full of paracetamol, avoiding taking another two aching teeth to the dentist. The daft thing is, my dentist is good, and very helpful (lets me have a stress ball, arranged sedation for a big job, even though sedation is officially frowned on by UK dentists), but I am still deadly afraid of going. Which makes it kind of awkward getting the boys to go quietly (#1 son has inherited my teeth, and last time we tried to get him a filling he bit the dentist, #2 son fell face-first onto a log and had to have all four top incisors out).

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Goodhart (author)Kiteman2007-11-09

I haven't any memories of fearing the dentist, but now I am definitely not afraid....she has the gentlest touch I have ever known.....she can slip that horrid needle into the roof of my mouth and I don't cringe a bit (hardly feel it actually). ;-)

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TheCheese9921 (author)Goodhart2007-11-09

Yeah, when I get fillings (I've had more than I'd like to admit, but I do love candy) my dentist can get the needle in and I barely feel it, he usually tells me joke or just starts talking to me to distract me.

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Goodhart (author)TheCheese99212008-01-03

Well, my dentist doesn't have to say anything to be a distraction, especially when she leans over me....

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Kiteman (author)Goodhart2008-01-04

LOL - I used to have a woman like that cut my hair - she'd stand behind me, lean over to do the front, and the world would go very quiet, and pleasantly warm and snug ...

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Sunbanks (author)Kiteman2008-01-03

I once bit my dentist. My teeth are kind of like that except they don't splinter, they just get really worn down from eating. Actually, thats only my third or second molars(I think). When I lost one tooth (I don't know which tooth but it was back around the molars) it broke into three pieces and one was still in my mouth. The other one had a hole right through it. The dentist never said they were cavities.

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Kiteman (author)Sunbanks2008-01-04

Synchronicity - #1 son went to the dentist again this morning (about 8 hours ago as I type), and he was a good boy. Why? Pain.

He'd been telling us he had a sore tummy, or a headache, but he finally admitted it was toothache - it turned out to be an infection under a milk tooth. A check today revealed a need to remove ten milk teeth, some time in February.

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Goodhart (author)Kiteman2008-01-04

milk teeth, for those in the USA, baby teeth (or temporary, or primary)... ;-)

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Kiteman (author)Goodhart2008-01-04

Thanks, GH, I thought the term milk teeth was universal.

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Goodhart (author)Kiteman2008-01-04

Hmm, now that I think about it, it probably is more so than not. But, over here, different parts of the country speak so very differently than other parts, it is sometimes hard to tell.

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Goodhart (author)Kiteman2008-01-04

I kind of recognized it, but hadn't heard it used for many years....so I thought that might help a little in case anyone was confused. :-)

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TheCheese9921 (author)Kiteman2007-11-09

Wow, that sounds like it hurts, is it from a lack of calcium or just hereditary?

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Kiteman (author)TheCheese99212007-11-10

I assume heredity, since I have always drunk plenty of milk, eaten cheese and yoghurt etc, plus my dentist said it's "just one of those things".

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chaoscampbell (author)Kiteman2007-11-09

I hear ya kiteman, my teeth are jacked as well. I never payed any attention to oral hygiene when I was younger and unfortunately my parents never harassed me about it. I didn't really care for them at all until I was about 17 (bad teeth and girls don't mix....no matter how much money or coolness you have) but that combined with heredity, it was far to late to reverse. I'm 25 years old and I've had many many teeth removed. the ones that weren't removed all needed (or still need) root canals. I've been saving for about three years now (not including the $7000 of work I've already had done) next year I get my implant surgery. A full set of brand new indistructable (well non decaying anyways) teeth. I can't wait to smile again. a $50 000 smile but once the sticker shock wears off..... a smile I can show without embarrassment

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ledzep567 (author)2008-01-05

my mom tore her ACL playing soccer a year ago. they replaced it with a dead guys ACL lol when she came home she wass till under the anesthesia and she thought to herself" oh i can do this, it doesnt even hurt!" so she didnt take any pain meds that night and when she woke up she said she was in so much pain she popped 15 perkiset and felt like she was about to die i felt sorry for her

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Spl1nt3rC3ll (author)2008-01-04

I almost had all four plus two others pulled out the day after Christmas. I got so stressed I actually got (made myself unintentionally) sick, so it got canceled and moved to MLKing day. This is because I have an extreme fear of dentistry/ortho, due to past (horrible) experiences.

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jessyratfink (author)2007-11-09

I haven't had mine out. I will when it's time, but for now I'm a bit terrified of the dentist. :( Though I need to go... I've chipped my front tooth.

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Yeah I chipped my front tooth also (In the 4th grade) they just poke you with a couple needles then fill it. I hate the needles but if you don't think about it when they do it you only feel a poke.

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I'm fine with them sticking needles in me, it's the grinding and horrible noises that get me. :(

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Goodhart (author)jessyratfink2007-11-09

and that horrible smell of smoking teeth LOL

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Kiteman (author)DIY Dave2007-11-10

I have discovered something that smells exactly the same - the dust from a sawn snail-shell

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iman (author)Kiteman2007-11-10

try cutting ivory. bleck :P that is most disgusting smell ever.

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Goodhart (author)iman2007-11-10

manyu bone-like antler like, horn like substances smell the same depending on how they are cut.

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DIY Dave (author)Goodhart2007-11-14

Yes, I've smelled that too and it smells even worse, but when you smell it at least you know it's not your teeth that are being grinded off.

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iman (author)Goodhart2007-11-10

try using a dull band saw blade the burning smell is horrid.

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Goodhart (author)iman2007-11-10
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Kiteman (author)iman2007-11-11
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jessyratfink (author)Goodhart2007-11-09

OH GAWD Never going to the dentist again. :P

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canida (author)jessyratfink2007-11-11

I know some good dentists near you- will PM.

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DIY Dave (author)2007-11-09

I have had 10 teeth pulled 4 wisdom and 6 others that I didn't have room for in my mouth.

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TheCheese9921 (author)DIY Dave2007-11-10

Wow and I thought 4 was tough. Were they all at once (insane), or how many at a time?

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DIY Dave (author)TheCheese99212007-11-14

My wisdom teeth were all pulled at one time and my other teeth another time.

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canida (author)2007-11-08

I had one of mine removed in high school, the other three when I was in college. The first one really hadn't erupted as far as it had looked in the x-rays, so the rest got to wait a year or two. (My dad did the extraction, and felt really bad about it, but as he said, "after all that drilling you were going to swell anyway, so I had to go ahead and finish the extraction. Next time I'm sending you to the oral surgeon, who's got a proper set-up for nitrous and anesthetic."

After all the drilling/swelling with the first removal I was pretty set on having full anesthesia, but was talked into trying it with nitrous and local anesthetic, "and then we'll anesthetize you if you want."

Between the nitrous and the bass-heavy music, they had to shake my shoulder to tell me they were done. I didn't believe them, but my teeth were sitting on the tray. ;)

I highly recommend this option, as it doesn't involve the really nasty unpleasant after-effects of anesthetic. And I can attest that it's plenty effective. Ask if your dentist offers the nitrous + local anesthetic option.

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zachninme (author)canida2007-11-09

Wait, did you do it without any anesthetic the first time? *cowers in fear of the anti-anesthesia*

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canida (author)zachninme2007-11-11

Local. ;)
I hadn't gotten my dad that annoyed...

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zachninme (author)canida2007-11-11

"I want to go to MIT and then start a company named after an aquatic creature and then start a web site that has a mainly orange color scheme!" "If you bother me one more time, we're not going to give you anestesetic!" You're childhood must have been... interesting :P

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westfw (author)canida2007-11-10

I really hate the dizzy buzziness of nitrous; I've had a couple of oral surgeries where the default option would have been a local and nitrous, and I opted to do JUST the local. I didn't feel any pain; I think the nitrous is just for the squeamish. (but then I seem to have a high pain tolerance; I don't use any anesthetics for fillings, and I've had some pretty significant work (crown prep) done without anesthetic as well, though I've since decided that was being overly silly...)

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Kiteman (author)westfw2007-11-10

Nitrous is excellent

I had it when my appendix swelled to the size of my two fists - it switched me from a screaming ball of pain to a happy loon that invited the paramedics to a party that didn't exist.

It's just a shame they wouldn't give me it after the surgery, because the surgeon nicked an artery and somehow made various important parts of me turn black and treble in size. That was more uncomfortable than the staples.

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TheCheese9921 (author)canida2007-11-09

They offered my just the nitrous and the local anesthetic option but I took the knockout lol. I think I slept off the after effects so far.

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chooseausername (author)2007-11-09

That's weird ...
Why do you all remove them ?? What may happen if you don't ?

I remember that when my wisdom teeth came through it was painful. They came through slowly, so the pain lasted for years.
My dentist talked about removing them, once, but I never did ... and now it's OK, I don't have any problem with my jaws and my 32 teeth =o)

I have a fear of surgery and anesthetic anyway ...

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Kiteman (author)chooseausername2007-11-09

That's evolution for you - changes in diet have meant we do not need such a powerful jaw as we did before humans invented cooking. Consequently, our jaws have become smaller and more delicate, yet we still have the same number and size of teeth as our manly-chinned ancestors.

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canida (author)Kiteman2007-11-09

Actually, we haven't evolved out of it (yet)- the time scale is still too short.

If we ate the same types of food our hunter-gatherer ancestors did we'd put more muscular strain on the jaw bones, which causes them to grow larger and stronger. Our highly processed diets (and yes, cooked food fits into this category) are just less work to chew.

But we could still grow jaws to fit wisdom teeth.

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Kiteman (author)canida2007-11-09

I'm not so sure - as a species, H.sapiens is only around 200ky-250ky old, and a quick search of NS archives finds an article that puts the skill of cooking as being nearly 10 times older than humanity. The loss of jawline could easily pre-date the evolution of modern humans.

Anthropologists have not been able to agree on when our earliest ancestors started to prepare food. Current estimates place the advent of cooking anywhere between 2 million and 300,000 years ago.(Reference).

Human evolution timeline.
Wikipedia Human evolution timeline

I wonder - do modern, but "primitive" cultures suffer from the same dental problems (sugar-induced decay aside) that we do?

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canida (author)Kiteman2007-11-11

So, our pre-human ancestors with the scarily-large jaws? They're at least partially due to the less-cooked nature of their food.

Pre-agricultural human societies (hunter-gatherers) don't get access to refined sugars and starches (starch + saliva's amylase = sugar), eat a far more varied diet than we now do (hooray for industrial monoculture!), and eat more fibrous foods.
They 1) have slightly larger jaws, certainly enough to accommodate wisdom teeth, 2) don't get cavities, 3) don't have heart disease or diabetes. This is held up by current-day studies of hunger-gatherer societies, and they've got some nice observations on what happens to these societies when introduced to the standard western diet.

Of course, current hunter-gatherers live in the marginal areas- historically, they liked to hang out in the more lush, advantageous spots that we've converted to post-agricultural civilization. The historic hunter-gatherers were actually slightly taller (on average) than the current average human height (we're just now managing to get back to that height), and again didn't show signs of dental decay or the other diseases of civilization. Their teeth were quite worn, though, simply from use.

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Kiteman (author)canida2007-11-11

I knew they didn't have the decay problems we have, but do they have the same problems of mis-aligned, crooked teeth (like oogitsmelol's Xray), as the NS article said?

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