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can a stationary bicycle generate 500 watts? Answered

Tags:bike

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user
lieuwe (author)2009-05-02

you might be able to do so, but you need to have a big flywheel and lots off gears(up to the point that you can barely get it started)

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lemonie (author)2009-04-30

Sustained output at this level would be very hard work. If you're thinking of generating power yourself this way it's probably something to think better of (unless you cycle hard a lot?)

L

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endolith (author)2009-04-29

Yes, it's possible. Wikipedia says:

100 W - biomed: approximate basal metabolic rate used by the human body[3]
500 W - biomed: power output of a person working hard physically
909 W - biomed: peak output power of a healthy human (nonathlete) during a 30-second cycle sprint at 30.1 degree Celsius. [4]
up to 2 kW - biomed: approximate short-time power output of sprinting professional cyclists

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orders_of_magnitude_(power)

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NachoMahma (author)2009-04-29

. The generator may be able to, but humans can only put out about 150-200 W.

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Xellers (author)2009-04-29

No, unfortunately it cannot. I once tried a bike generator hooked up to a 60 watt lamp and it wasn't too easy. I doubt that a normal non-steroid abusing bicyclist can do this.

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NikonDork (author)2009-04-29

No. Not if a human is powering it.

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