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can anyone help in the creation of a robot prosthetic leg? Answered

my crew coach got into a horrible motorcycle accident and he had to be amputated above the knee. i had an idea using accelerometers and electronic gyroscopes to make the leg balance itself but i have no idea how to script or program. i also need to figure out how to make the leg move when it needs to and stop when it needs to. i have not started this project yet, but who knows i might be done by the time someone reads this.

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joeythepainter (author)2013-01-14

Just an addendum to what everyone else has said, my wife was an Occupational Therapist at a nursing home years ago, and she had multiple instances of being told to "throw away" old prosthetic legs from patients (elderly) who died, may of these had knee joints etc. and titanium or carbon metal parts that served as the structure/bones.

She salvaged a few, and I offered some folks whom when I found were amputees, if they had any use for them or knew of who would, they did all make a very good point, and first question out of their mouths was, "What shoe size is it?"

Making me realize, that beyond the inconvenience, "Not having a leg" must be, the added inconvenience isn't the length that needs to be specific so much as the rubber foot at the end, "Duh?! I thought, who would want to have to buy 2 shoes and never use the other one, or not have the other one fit your loaner or upcycled prosthesis.

Just thought I'd add my two cents as I'd hate to come to find a bunch of
work went into it leg measured, but wrong too big or too small shoe size.

Cheers.

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rickharris (author)2012-03-20

This isn't a project for someone with a lack of skill in the area no matter what the motivation.

You would need a lot of medical engineering experience as well as a lot o money. Leave i to the experts in this case.

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katman101 (author)rickharris2012-03-20

i have the ability to assemble the leg and wire it, i just need parts and a lot of free time/money.

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rickharris (author)katman1012012-03-21

I may turn out to be wrong but having spent some time in the University of HULL (UK) medical prosthesis department a couple of years ago the work they are doing is VERY complicated.

How the limbs work but physically and with the human patient is critical to their success. there was nothing simple about them.

I see little reason to need a self balancing leg when the human wearing it is still capable of balancing - indeed the demands of the leg MUST work in cooperation with the rest of the human not independently of him.

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katman101 (author)rickharris2012-03-21

oh... sounds alot harder then i thought. i saw something where they put pins into someones nerves then it turned the nervous systems messages into analog commands for a robot arm. but i do not have the knowledge or money to do anything that complex.

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pie R []ed (author)katman1012012-03-22

good quality prosthesis cost many thousands of dollars. you need lightweight efficient batteries, strong, precise, an compact actuators, a method of control intuitive to the wearer, and the whole thing shouldn't be much heavier than a human leg (about 15 lbs). the assembly and wiring is the easiest part. most of the parts would be hard to find at best, and the composite materials used (carbon fiber, special plastics, aluminum, etc.) need specific tools to machine.

I'm not trying to discourage you, but i feel you should know what you're getting into if you proceed. If you feel up to the challenge, I wholeheartedly encourage you to go for it. i would start by researching antique prosthesis, as well as modern. its always helpful to look at the fundamentals when approaching any task. try looking at current low cost prosthesis, and try basing your designs off those.

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katman101 (author)pie R []ed2012-03-23

good idea. i'll start small and build off that.

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pie R []ed (author)katman1012012-03-23

good luck! i'd love to see what you come up with!

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lemonie (author)2012-03-20

What is your crew coach's opinion on this?

L

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katman101 (author)lemonie2012-03-20

he is still in the hospital but i think he'd let me build him a leg if i asked.

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lemonie (author)katman1012012-03-21

I would ask him first before making any plans, he'd probably be pleased to know you thought that much about his condition.

L

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katman101 (author)lemonie2012-03-22

i was planning to. i also need to measure his leg for modeling purposes. i just downloaded AutoCAD and will be useing that to model the prototype.

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lemonie (author)katman1012012-03-23

It's good for people to think of each other, I like your idea.
I work in the UK Health Service, and I know there are professionals who will do a proper-job easily because they do it as a career. See if you can find some of these people, and if they can teach you a few things. "Work-experience" I guess.


L

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