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has anyone tried to create a real car body out of paper mache? Answered

How would the shell hold up to aerodynamic and general usage pressures? What kind of cost figures would there be? Are there any government grants available to address this idea? I figure once painted and sealed there wouldn't be any problems with weather. I can only imagine that the overall result is a lighter car, improving gas mileage. Additionally, any modifications to the shell would be a lot easier.

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james.ferrell.1257 (author)2015-02-26

Hello,yes I build them as small models,of muscle cars.Check out my 1972 Olds 442.Trust me it's easy and you will enjoy making.

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diuwe (author)2010-12-29

I am building car out of papermache but I have only just begun I will keep you posted on how it is going by the way it is a one man racing car

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brotherelsabar (author)2010-04-24

 en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papier-m%C3%A2ch%C3%A9
so if you go down to air craft uses the US Airforce used paper mache drop tanks impregnated with plastics, that may be resistant to water and such.

I think if you were to build something of the sort you might want to consider using a support frame that could share the load and direct it away from the paper mache its self.

Another thing you might want to explore is the use of different paper/ plastic composites and laminates. Similar to what  the the airforce used, that sould make it stronger while reducing the need for excess mache.

hope this is of any use to you

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z7eightball (author)2010-01-23

paper mache with ribs in it maybe, dont drive in the rains.

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Larek (author)2009-07-30

Interesting Idea, It would be cheap and easy to repair however..

"overall result is a lighter car" is going to be a problem. PM is light when its thin, and not very strong. Hence easily damaged catastrophically by a three year-old and a wiffle bat.

Thick enough PM and its support structure (PM or other wise) would likely be very heavy.

I'm not a PM expert, but to find out how think a body panel would have to be, make a 4'x3' panel, attach it to your roof-rack of a vehicle and test to find what thickness at that area can stay intact in a 70mph wind.

Personaly I think you would have better results with Balsa wood, than PM.

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