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how do i get rid of fleas on our indoor kitten? Answered

She has been seldom outsine for 2.5 months when we got her, but was picked from a litter of feral cats and had fleas then. She is over 12 months old. We use a Sergeants's flea collar and Hartz Advanced Care Flea and Tick drops but nothing seems to work and I hate using poisinous chemcals on her. They seem to congregate around her face and nose.
Any advice will be appreciated,
Thank you. 

11 Replies

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seandogue (author)2009-10-11

In addition to the comments below, I'll add these:

1.Ask your vet before using frontline or similar flea control on a kitten. It might be better to be cautious wlth a youngling.

2. Vacuum like crazy. If you can suck up the flea eggs, they can't successfully breed indoors. When my cats first show signs in the summer, I start vacuuming very regularly, as well as applying frontline to the cats. But the are mature (ie, > 1yr old) I read something in an old book once that said the vacuum cleaner was a boon to early users, since it reduced or eliminated fleas indoors.

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steveastrouk (author)seandogue2009-10-12

The cat's a year old according to the OP ! Quite old enough to go onto Frontline.

Steve

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seandogue (author)steveastrouk2009-10-13

Hmm....True...Don't quite know how I missed that. I hate doh moments.

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user
steveastrouk (author)2009-10-10

So what will kill ticks ? Are there non-poisonous chemicals which can kill ticks ? 

Use the special drips. They are fantastic, much less stressful for the cat than anything else we've ever found.

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Re-design (author)steveastrouk2009-10-10

I agree.  Our 2 cats and 3 dogs all are inside and they get the drops once a month.  No problems and best of all - no fleas.

Also if your house has carpet and the humidity is high it makes the flea problem worse.

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Molten Boron (author)Re-design2009-10-11

And if your house does not have carpet, your cat probably hates you.

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orksecurity (author)steveastrouk2009-10-11

Depends on the cat. Mine was already used to wearing a collar at times ("you are _not_ going out of the house undressed, young lady!") so she didn't object to the traditional flea collar. Those also work pretty well, though I think the drops are supposed to be slightly better for the cat (and significantly more expensive.)

The one time (in 19 years) that we got a serious infestation that collar or powder couldn't solve, the vet recommended an insecticidal shampoo. Luckily, again, this was a siamese and hence an unusually cooperative cat; as long as I kept the water temperature reasonable and let her cuddle on my lap for an hour while towelling her try, she was willing to put up with it with no more than token objection.

But... Yeah. Keep that cat protected, since she's going to be your main flea vacuum. If necessary, there are insecticidal carpet cleaners and the like; the better ones are based on an insect hormone and are pretty harmless to higher life forms. I'm not sure whether bombs based onthat stuff exist. Whatever you do, expect it to take a month; keep going over the cat with a flea comb until you stop seeing them, then a bit longer. (You do know about dunking the flea comb in a detergent solution to kill any removed fleas, right?)

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Sean_Voodoo (author)2009-10-10

yes listen to jtp139 but first go to ur vet and ask them ,or just wash ur cat A LOT maybe 1 every 2 days

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steveastrouk (author)Sean_Voodoo2009-10-11

Wrong. The systemic insecticides keep the cat poisonous to new fleas. After a month, no new fleas.

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jtp139 (author)2009-10-10

You need to treat the whole house. Fleas will lay eggs everywhere like carpets, bedding, etc. So if you treat the cat it will keep getting them because they live where the cat lives. Try doing a bomb.

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steveastrouk (author)jtp1392009-10-10

If you keep the cat treated, any remaining eggs will hatch, leap onto the cat and then die.

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