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please help yellow jackets have invaded our humming bird feeder Answered

hello everyone i have quite the question for you you see i have a humming bird feeder and for the past 3-4 years we have enjoyed humming birds all summer long but ever since the yellow jackets have found the feeder the hummers are nowhere to be found we have tried searching for the nest but no luck if anyone has any ideas please post them also see the picture below to get an idea of the type of feeder i am using

thank you,
fidgety


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Rick alde (author)2016-09-22

If there is no Hummingbirds there you could put wasp killer into the feeder then when they are all dead, just clean it out.

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Kiteman (author)2011-07-06

Try sitting still a short distance away and watching the yellowjackets - if they're all coming from one nest, you should get an idea of where they're coming from.

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fidgety2 (author)Kiteman2011-07-06

we have attempted this and found it hard to see them as they fly any ideas?

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Toga_Dan (author)fidgety22016-09-18

lie on ground. Bugs will b seen against sky rather than against busy background of bushes, trees etc.

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Kiteman (author)fidgety22011-07-06

Maybe a hummingbird proof yellowhammer trap?

Leave the hummingbird feeder dry for a few days,let the yellowhammers get trapped, then re-stock the hummingbird feeder.

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DollyD7 (author)2016-09-18

If the holes are too big and let's the yellow jackets in then make the holes smaller!.. I used hot glue gun to fill half the hole in with glue. At first the bees came a running but soon found that they couldn't get in the sugar water. SUCCESS feels so good...No harm no foul!

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LesB (author)2012-09-09

1. Make sure the feeding holes are not large enough for the yellowjackets to to get through.
2. Then, as someone mentioned, clean the outside of the feeder well.
3. Make sure the feeder does not leak.

Do these things then the yellowjackets will have no reason to attach the feeder because they can't get food there. They'll go somewhere else for food, maybe to your neighbors.

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LadyInRedwoods (author)2012-04-21

Are you still having problems with the yellowjackets? I just recently read an article that suggested tying a dryer sheet to the feeder. The author claimed they no longer had issues with bees (no mention of yellowjackets). I can't personally vouch for this solution but it is inexpensive, non-destructive to otherwise beneficial insects, and may be worth a try. Don't forget to change the sheet after a rain!

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TheLegoDJ (author)2011-07-11

We had this problem a while ago. What helped was cleaning the humming bird feeder really really well. Making sure to not splash any sugar all over the sides and whatnot. If not maybe a new feeder?

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lemonie (author)2011-07-07


You might succeed by giving the wasps a more appealing source of sugar a few metres away. I assume that they're after the sweet stuff?

L

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Goodhart (author)2011-07-06

IF you have a garden, ridding yourself of all the yellow jackets might be a mistake.  The reason for this is that Yellow Jackets are indeed meat eaters and will eat aphids, potato beetles and just about anything of the kind. Unlike "bees", Yellow Jackets are preditary wasps.
Unlike paper wasps and hornets, they rarely build "out where you can see them" (under logs, loose dirt, etc) and so may be very hard to locate, and once you "come across them", you might actually regret the act. Vespula species build concealed nests, usually underground.  These are normally the type that get "roused" when one mows the lawn and they happen to have a nest under the ground in that area. Yellowjacket nests usually last for only one season, dying off in winter. In milder climates however, they can survive the winter and become quite massive.


Wrens, nuthatches, titmice all eat insects however, so attracting them can keep your population under control.  

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