How to Make Your Own Mandala Coloring Page

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Introduction: How to Make Your Own Mandala Coloring Page

About: I teach in a Makerspace in a public elementary school in Oakland, CA. I also am obsessed with making mosaics.

I teach in a Makerspace in Oakland, CA for grades K-5. Lately, we've been making our own Mandala coloring pages, and it's extremely easy and satisfying. It's also fun for students to make these coloring pages for each other. Eventually, I want to turn a collection of student-made coloring pages into a school coloring book and sell it as a fundraiser for our school. I've done this project with 2nd and 3rd graders, but it could easily work with older and younger students, too.

Supplies:

Compass, pencil, ruler, ultra-fine Sharpie (or some other fine black marker). Colorful markers to color in designs.

Step 1: Circles and Guidelines

Using your compass, draw 3 or 4 concentric circles. If you don't have a compass, you can try tracing around objects (start with the largest object first; this helps you center your circles). You might also want to add lines across the diameter of the circle, as guidelines. I didn't do this with my students, but it might be helpful for some people. I've included pdfs of these templates. For the student samples I've posted here, I just gave the 2nd graders one solid circle, with a dot in the middle and had them create their own concentric circles. It was an opportunity to explain to them that "concentric circles share the same center."

Step 2: Adding Details

Next, add details to your circles in pencil. You can add any kind of line, shape or texture. I've included a pdf of a handout that I've given students with several examples. The only requirement is to continue the pattern around the circle. I model for the students making a mandala with no pattern, just and ask them what seems wrong to them. Then I ask them how to correct my work. I do a few examples on the board for them, using a variety of different details, just to give them a sense of how endless their options can be.

Step 3: Tracing Over the Pattern

Using your ultra-fine Sharpie, or another fine black marker, trace over your pattern and erase any extra pencil marks. That's it! You have your coloring page!

Step 4: Samples

Here are a few more samples from my 2nd-grade class. I love how each one is so unique. It's hard to believe that something so simple could be so engaging, satisfying and result in such a beautiful image. I hope you enjoy making mandalas with your students as much as I do.

Note: Because the instructions are so simple if you make copies of the "Detail ideas" page and the template, this can also work very well as a plan for a substitue.

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    6 Discussions

    0
    mcsexton
    mcsexton

    9 months ago on Introduction

    Thank you! I'm sharing this with my Art students today. We're distance learning now because of CV-19, so bless you. :)

    0
    Rochellejacobs
    Rochellejacobs

    Reply 9 months ago

    I'm so glad. I've been really inspired by the generosity of everyone sharing their resources. I've made some videos of projects that my students should be able to do with materials at home, if you want some other ideas. I'm finding the hardest part of this distant learning is trying to figure out activities that only use things that most people have at home. Good luck with your online teaching; I know it isn't easy!
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5fDrPA0P_4QzPNbdTDTYYA/videos

    0
    jessyratfink
    jessyratfink

    1 year ago

    What a fantastic activity :D

    0
    Rochellejacobs
    Rochellejacobs

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hi, I thought this might make you smile. When I do a project in my classroom, whenever possible, I write a "mini" Instructable on the board, in case after explaining the project, kids want to review steps. I never really thought about it before. But today one of my first graders, made a playdough monster and he said, "Ms. Jacobs, I wrote out the plan in case you want to make this someday."
    I don't know if you are fluent in first grade writing, but it says," 1 piece of playdough. Step One, Roll it out. Put it on the table." He had another page, but I forgot to take a picture of it.
    A future Instructables writer?!!!

    IMG_2659.JPG
    0
    jessyratfink
    jessyratfink

    Reply 1 year ago

    Ohhhhhhhh my goodness that is adorable!!! And what a great idea to make a mini ible on the board :D

    0
    Rochellejacobs
    Rochellejacobs

    Reply 1 year ago

    Hey, thanks. My students have really gotten into it. I hope other teachers try it out. These mandalas are great to calm down the classroom in a creative way.