How to Make a Cutlery Dryer

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Introduction: How to Make a Cutlery Dryer

Hello

I would like to present to you this inexpensive and fast solution for drying cutlery and cooking utensils. Simplistically made with a few nuts and bolts and couple of aluminium cans.

I sourced the nuts and bolts from a local hardware store and the aluminium can were a buy product of a recent bolognaise meal.

If you need a somewhere to dry your cutlery and utensils give this a try!

Step 1: Tools and Materials

For this instruction you need some materials and tools:

5x Nuts and Bolts BZP M3 x 13mm

2x Aluminium Cans

Flat head screwdriver

M3+ Screw or Nail (3-4mm)

Hammer

Marker

Gather the items in the list of items above.

I recommend using a hammer and nail of 3mm to puncture the holes, but, if you don't have a hammer, screw or nail, find a sharp knife to puncture the aluminium can with. Do be safe and careful when doing this.

Step 2: Prepping the Cans

Remove the lid or any wrap surrounding the can and wash thoroughly to remove any glue of food.

Turn the cans over so that the bottom is facing upwards and puncture the can a few times, this will allow moisture to escape.

Step 3: Connecting the Cans

Puncture a hole at the same level on each can near the brim.

Use the nuts and bolts to tightly fasten the two cans together using a screwdriver.

Step 4: Attaching the Dryer to the Rack

If you wish to attach the cans to the rack this is a simple method of doing so.

Use a pen marker to mark above and below the drying rack on the can, as shown in the images, this is to make a puncture hole either side of the rack support to fasten with nuts and bolts.

*This probably isn't the most secure way of doing this so if you can think of a better and more secure way, use your intuitive and do it, and please let me know in the comments.*

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    15 Comments

    0
    sod.almighty
    sod.almighty

    7 days ago

    And after two weeks, when the cans have gone rusty....what is the next step?

    0
    Brian of Fairfield
    Brian of Fairfield

    Reply 5 days ago

    These cans can't rust. They are aluminium!

    0
    munrosquirrel
    munrosquirrel

    Reply 1 day ago

    but.... they do! maybe my cans are produced differently?

    1
    DebbiW4
    DebbiW4

    7 days ago

    Great idea; I like how you used those lined cans so they won't rust. Perfect for impromptu situation, like camping!

    0
    Pernickety Jon
    Pernickety Jon

    7 days ago

    Great idea - simple and effective. Using two cans adds stability as well as functionality. I'm going to adapt this for use in my workshop. From past rusty experience I'd put a few holes in the base very close to the edge. Water will pool in the 'corners'.

    1
    shalnachywyt
    shalnachywyt

    8 days ago

    Nice. I'm lazy. I took a binder clip and an empty sour cream container, drilled holes in the sour cream container and clamped it to my metal drain. Works like a charm.

    1
    TimB2
    TimB2

    8 days ago

    I've done something similar back in the past. I used mine for a paint brush holder back when I did acrylic paintings. That way the bristles would not be damaged. Also I could see which brush I wanted quickly without having to hunt through them.

    2
    YaënD
    YaënD

    Tip 8 days ago

    Hello, great recycling stuff, I think that water could pour better by drilling holes by the inside to the outside...

    0
    LynneDe
    LynneDe

    8 days ago

    I would use the brackets that the satellite or cable TV/Internet people use to hold a cable to the side of your house...I bought plastic ones on Amazon, one Internet guy used similar to bring one cable in, another used aluminum ones. You could pop rivet them to the can after putting them over the wire of the dish drainer or you could screw them to a piece of wood from the inside of the can outward, using the screw that comes with it. Blessings!

    0
    Steve Wheeler
    Steve Wheeler

    8 days ago

    Rather than the bolts, you might consider some small screw hooks.

    0
    kngtek
    kngtek

    8 days ago

    For a stainless utensil holder use an IKEA Ordning holder (4-3/8"D x 5-3/8"H or 4-3/8"D x 7-1/8"H) which have predrilled drying holes on the sides & bottom. When a Brogrund towel hook is bolted to the side (near the top) these are multi-functional i.e. I hang them on my workshop wall for storing tools. These are surprisingly affordable & will last a lifetime.

    1
    abresett
    abresett

    8 days ago on Step 4

    It would make sense and also less work to use zip ties both to connect the cans to each other and to attach them to a dish drainer.

    0
    doo da do
    doo da do

    8 days ago

    Out of BoX thinker NICE