Wheelchair Joystick

Has anyone ever conected a wii nunchuck to a electric wheelchair as a secondary controller and speed control if so does anyone have the instructions on how to achieve this please Allan

Topic by Bigall51   |  last reply


find old electric wheelchair?

I would like to find a electric wheelchair/electric wheelchair motors to make a RC snow plow for one of my disabled friends. any ideas of where i could get one dirt cheap \ free round the northern MD area. any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Question by bigbodysmallbrain   |  last reply


Solar Powered Electric Wheelchair

I would like to put a Challenge out there for anyone to come up with. You see, I am in a wheelchair and I would love to go hiking with my son, but my chair can only go so far before it needs to be plugged back into a socket. I hate this, because it keeps me from going most places I want to go outdoors. But it dawned on me that if I had a Solar Powered Option to my chair, nothing could hold me back from being outdoors again. Ok yah,  it would help if I could redesign the platform & wheels too, but that's not the most important part... I NEED POWER. So, if anyone feels like taking on a new challenge and you are into Solar Power perhaps you could help me in this way. Thank You for your time in reading this, I hope to plant seeds of inspiration with all of you! May Love Light Your Way, Blessings! 

Topic by CherishJames   |  last reply


old discharged electric wheelchair batteries

My paralyzed wife passed away in 5/2007 and her 2 electric wheelcairs that are no longer in use have thouroly dead batteries. I don't know what kind they are other then they are a sealed unit. I want to sell them but can't with dead batteries. Can they be brought back to life? The on board chargers don't seem to do anything.

Question by Jerry S   |  last reply


I have an electric wheelchair that contains 2- 12v gel batt

I have an electric wheelchair that contains 2-12v batteries. the charger has 115v/230vac input & 24vdc/5a output. what do i need to get to be able to install a solar charge / battery maintain system?

Question by Richard Earle   |  last reply


Please can I use car engine starter motor (12 volts) to build an electric wheelchair?

Please can I use car engine starter motor (12 volts) to build an electric wheelchair? If so, how do I connect it to batteries?

Question by dankyi   |  last reply


build my own powered / electric wheelchair out of manual wheelchair?

Hello, Newbie here! I was hoping to convert my manual wheelchair into an electric powered one.. What would be the best way to go about this? Could I just install hub motor on the real wheels? Or would a gear motor be better? I was planning to control it using arduino as I would eventually want to make it gaze-controlled (working on the eye tracking code at the moment..if anyone has any advice for that to that would be great!) It is a really important project following an ALS diagnosis and it would mean everything if I could make this work somehow..I am not based in the EU but have family in the UK who could send me over the parts if they don't deliver. I know it can be cheap to just buy a second hand powered wheelchair but where I am it is not so easy to come across and eventually I would have to adapt it to anyway..I also thought it could be a fun project for me to work on as I was an engineering student.  Also is arduino the best way to control it, I am using the viola-jones eye tracking algorithm in matlab.. Thanks for any help! Also if you cant help directly even links to pages that can help would be useful :)))

Question by NadaA2   |  last reply


I want to modify an electric wheelchair to use tracks. It's for an obese family member who lives on a farm. Answered

I need to modify a bariatric powerchair with tracks.  I know the driveline will need to be modified as well as the electronics.  I realize there are chairs made like that (tankchair) but at 20 grand, it's out of reach.  Does anyone have any idea on how and where to begin?

Question by dtc989   |  last reply


Brain controlled robot wheelchair!

Last week I had the opportunity to work with a couple of awesome projects that combined to be even more awesome: I drove a powered wheelchair simply by using my brain! Here are a couple more, longer videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJKXFENEDdE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVc4KOgEUlw I was wearing an Emotiv EEG headset that Steve Castellotti of Puzzlebox has configured to work with Lego Brainstorms robots (this is a pretty cool project in itself, check it out at Puzzlebox's site).  He has a program that allows the headset wearer to input arbitrary keypresses on the linked computer, configurable to the output from the headset.  The wheelchair robot is a work in process from Instructabler jerkey, who has hacked into the joystick controls to allow it to be driven using keypresses on ITS associated computer.  So it was relatively simple to log into the robot driver computer from the headset computer and send keypresses. Now, there is a bit more to say about the keypress creation.  The goal with an EEG headset is to get brain signals, but facial muscle movements are also detectable (they use electricity too and it turns out that the muscle signals are a lot stronger than the brain signals, for various reasons).  For myself, I found it very difficult to repeatably emit consistent brain waves, with only an hour or so of training.  It was a lot easier to get the software to detect a blink, wink, or grimace, so that's what I ended up using.  Still, I could not drive the robot very accurately, causing great hilarity amongst the observers.  More work is needed!  But it was an awesome and fascinating experience and I highly recommend it to anyone who has the opportunity. I've asked the two project builders to collaborate on an Instructable.  If this happens I will update this forum post with the link.

Topic by rachel   |  last reply


I need help converting a manule wheelchair in to an electric chair on the very cheap

I have a problem with this comany that I got an electric wheelchair from them was supposted to be donated but they are now charging me a $1000.00 for it or thay will come and get it. They promised that they would not come back and take it but it is a church outfit so I guess I expected this to happen. Any how I still have my old manual chair that is very hard for me to use so I need to find some way to convert it over to power if I can. Please if anyone can help I really need all the help that I can get. Without the power chair Im pretty much stuck in the house. If needed I can try to upload some pics of it. Thanks for all the help in advance.

Question by madrasi   |  last reply


Can anyone help me hack the joystick for my electric wheelchair for more power?

I've looked everywhere for help on this but can't find an answer. I purchased a Meritt's Regal 310 electric wheelchair that uses a Dynamic DL 5.2i joystick. I've added a quick clip showing the inside of my electric wheelchair controller "DL 5.2i" by Dynamic. If anyone knows how to manually tweak it to provide more power to the motors, please let me know. I've already had a guy from a resale shop try to adjust it with the corresponding handheld device with no luck. I transformed the chair into a portable transport, with room to haul stuff as well as attach a trailing cart for additional items. It works great but has a hard time going up hillls. Thanks, T

Question by Designing Change   |  last reply


what kind of attachments would be helpful for people in electric wheel chairs ?

Im open to any ideas that would be helpfull

Question by helpothers   |  last reply


Home made electric wheelchair build any advice on motors batteries or anything appreciated?

Hi (newbie) Im thinking of building my own electric wheelchair and have a few questions. When wiring multiple batteries to the motor controller, is it possible to (for example) if having 9 batteries, wire them in groups of three. So have three sets of three. Three in parallel, wired to be three groups in series. Therefore i could use three switches to be able to turn off some of  the batteries. Reason for this is so that if going slowly i could have more control.  Also i was thinking of differential steering with maybe two Etek motors, they would power the front wheels due to the torque (potential flipping). Any ideas how many batteries and the best type to use (extreme speed needed lol). Other ideas of potential motors, any advice or knowledge greatly received

Question by cameron11888   |  last reply


How would I go about interfacing an arduino with an old joystick from a wheelchair?

I have obtained a joystick module from an electric wheelchair.  The board says DYNAMIC CONTROLS (C) Mar 2011 GPC80830 REV E.  On the underside of the board, there seems to be test pads labeled the following: +5, MOSI, SCK, MISO, RST.  Slightly to the right of +5 is a test pad that says 0V.  Below are pads labeled SBL and SBH.  Slightly more to the right of 0V is a pad labeled SB+D.  Finally, furthest to the right are test pads BCN, BC, and BCP.  On the top side of the board there is an ATMEGA8A AU 1114 Micro-controller and an empty 5 pin through hole connector. Also soldered onto the board is a joystick that consists of a coil and 4 smaller coils soldered to the board in a + configuration around it (Some sort of EMF sensors?), a weird 4 pin connector and a 3 pin programming port resembling an XLR connector. Any ideas?

Question by gpotvin   |  last reply


What should I do with this electric wheel chair?

It has two 24 volt motors, a joystick and switches that go to the controller, it runs on two lead acid batteries. I think this means I have all the parts to make something awesome but I need help.? The problem is a metal scraper cut off the joystick assembly and threw out the wire that went to the controller, how do i recreate this wire from the leads inside the joystick assembly The schematics for the joystick assembly are unavailable. I will have to reverse engineer it, but i'm not good enough for that. What can I do with these motors and controllers and batteries. The electric trike seems pretty close to what i'm thinking. parts are too big for mountainboard. Its an invacare mark I or Mark II I think, circa 1990 The motors were pushing large standard size rear wheelchair wheels. Let me know your thoughts on this, I am a computer guy looking to be a gear head for a while, but I need a mentor. model number on the arrow micro controller is 1020393

Question by bramletabercrombie   |  last reply


How to decide the motor rating and torque required ?

I want to make manual  wheelchair to be electrically driven. For that I have assumed wheelchair weight to be=20 kg Patient's weight to be=100kg ( max ) Motor  with battery = 30 kg (approx) Thus total weight to be = 150 kg (approx) what kind of DC motor along with its rating should be used ?

Question by dhanudi   |  last reply


Whats the easiest way to make a height adjustable wash basin?

 I would like to make a height adjustable wash basin for someone in a wheelchair. It needs to be capable of being adjusted with one hand and must be able to lock in position. I already have the flexible plumbing supplies and waste fittings. I know that it can be done with electrics but am looking for a cheap alternative. Thanks.

Question by despooner   |  last reply


arduiono without an computer

Hey, i just got an arduiono uno and for now i made some testing (leds blinking and servo control and stuff like that) so im very new at it, But i have this idea i wanna make, i set an potentionmeter or i cant remember the name (you know one of the thing you turn and it gives you more or less power like when you control your sound) BUT i sat the turn thing on a servo so i can control it, and then i set it on a garabage collecter (a long arm i think the name is, you know for folk in wheelchairs that cant reach the floor use i to grab stuff) so i made a electric garabage collecter.  But i have a very big problem: it have to be plugged into the usb from the computer to work. So my question is, i see there are 2 places for putting in power and im wondering, if i upload the code first, then take usb out and plug the phone charger alike wire in, will it then work? and i do have loads of loads of batteries but i dont know how much power or anything the arduiono needs. So please help me. and sorry for my bad english. Markus

Topic by Kong markus   |  last reply


1st time robot. Too ambitious?

Hello All, I have recently started an ambitious project. There will certainly be much learning along the way.  But it is too ambitious? The goal is to build a bot that can be controlled remotely, to aid in the detection, marking, and ultimate removal of unexploded ordinance in Cambodia (in this first application).  Though I have never built a robot of any type, I am quickly learning the basics, but would like ultimate beginner advice if anyone had any.  If anyone would like details on the project, PM me.  It's really a lot for a forum post... If there are any Veterans or military buffs out there, I could really use other first hand accounts of experiencing UEO. Through generous donation and aquisition, I have come cross an electric wheelchair, and many parts needed for a former "Battle-Bot".  Battle-bot turns peace-maker.  I love it!  The motors are Bosche, 24V and ~750watts.  Included were DC motor (high amp) speed controls, and 2x 12v 26A sealed lead-acid batteries.  Very very excited to really dig in.  I lack a quality track or model of a good track to use for traction, etc.  Anyone know of any good and sturdy RC tank tracks I could look at for design or actual construction? Though I began to construct my own track out of sheet metal and various materials available (it actually turned out kinda ok), I don't intend on reinventing the wheel, as it were.  3" took me almost 2 hours. Will also be incorporating a ~3'-4' rotating and articulating arm.  Trying to keep its weight to under ~30lbs.  The wheelchair frame is very strong and moddable, Ws thinking of using a lazy susan type bearing, but I'm not sure I could find one rated for that weight for an affordable price.  Any suggestions? Thanks for checking this out.  Again, if you want more details, I'm happy to share my plans.  Just PM me. This is being designed 100% open-source, and 100% documented with a video and written journal in order to be easily duplicated.   Constructive criticism is NOT personal criticism! Huck

Topic by huck alexander   |  last reply


my summer as AIR at instructables

My time as an Artist in Residence at Instructables went something like this:  I arrived in San Francisco and arrived at the Instructables office. I was (to be honest, though now I'm so embarrassed by this assumption) expecting cubicles. Instead, there was energy, vibrancy, and TONS OF COOL PROJECTS!!I There were electronics scattered about (which is, like, enough to lure me in for life :).  I  met Noah and a few others. After discussing some contract stuff, he told me to come by for some pizza and ice cream in the afternoon. Sounds pretty cool... So, I went to Tech shop, I was blown away by the amound ot 3d printers, laser cutters and other amazing fabrication tools all under one roof, all waiting for me to use :)  Then ... free pizza and ice cream, and a bunch of new people... sounds fun. I arrived at 4:30 and it wasn't  quite a party, just yet. it was a talk. And an extremely interesting one, with a big portion of the Autodesk community present. So I really started to get a sense of who was in the community, and where does Instructables fit in. Then, I got to see .. DRY ICE ICE CREAM!!! So cool. Actually  enough to entice me to order dry ice for a near future party! Anyway, I somewhat rapidly began to feel right at home. I ordered some parts for some projects and I began working straightaway. I started working on small electronics projects and other experiments related to water and boat robots.  The next day (Thursday) I got a call at 10 PM in the evening… It was Noah. I was working at Tech shop at the time (I tried to work at Instructables office in the morning then head to T.S. in the afternoon to do some bigger scale construction work in the woodshop.  Well, the Redbull challenge had been announced ("games") and they had begun brainstorming how to make… yes, remote control electric wheelchairs, that were controlled by a user who had a blindfold on, and would be listening through a wireless radio to commands from the person in the wheelchair with no control over themselves. Anyway, I headed straight over to Instructables, and the 72 hours began… The next morning, I head over with Randy to pick up our will-call items from Jameco, including arduinos, wireless arduino shields, xbees etc etc. Then we headed to Noah's shop in Emeryville… and the hacking began. An unfortunate thing was that I had to go to teach Arduino at Tech Shop Sunday evening, which is when the actual fun of riding the wheelchair occurred. Anyway, it was a super cool weekend of collaboration and intense work. Oh, and by the way, see here how to make your own: PSYCHO SCOOTER scramble, here.  The rest of the summer continued on, the biggest accomplishment for me was getting Sneel_003 built and tested in the water. A really cool next step would be to get some 123d catch of underwater objects, trying it out at the aquarium, then do some 3d printing of cool underwater stuff. I did various other projects involving wireless communication, using Arduino for various electronics projects, programming joysticks and remote controllers, etc. A really neat thing is that every day at 2 pm there is "show and tell" which is just a quick "go around the table and say briefly what you've done in the past day". So I really got to get a feel for the way that things were working, who was operating on what, what was happening in the office and out of the office. So I felt immediately a part of the family, in a sense. Instructables is a super cool place: the facilities were amazing, the people were vibrant and knowledgable and motivated and fun, and the experience was super. The facilities I used most were: laser cutter, vacuum forming machine, woodshop, tons of electronics, 3d printer… Everyone I met from Instructables and AutuDesk as a whole was super helpful and great to talk to. It is really a great community. Before I left, I gave a presentation of my work during my time at Instructables. Here are the slides:

Topic by gabriellalevine   |  last reply


Instructables in the Telegraph -- Weird and wonderful inventions

The Telegraph ran a great article featuring online DIY culture and Instructables. Weird and wonderful inventions by Chris StevensMeet the DIY enthusiasts using the internet in their fight against throwaway society.The internet has spawned a new breed of extreme DIY enthusiasts. They build jet engines in their garages using instructions downloaded from forums, and they upload videos of the explosive results. They weld together rollercoasters out of scrap materials and household items. They teach themselves taxidermy to build "The Mouse Mouse", a real mouse with electrical innards. Or, like 17-year-old Thiago Olson, who built a fusion reactor in his house, they're scouting for parts in their local B & Q. The online DIYers are rebelling against a consumer society that has convinced many of us that everything is bought, not made. "It's a reaction against a mass-produced culture," says Eric Wilhelm, founder of Instructables.com. "People want to express themselves and show their individuality - building something cool that you can't buy and showing how you did it is a great way to express yourself."While the traditional DIYer is overjoyed to have put up a set of shelves without losing a finger, the extreme online DIYer spends the weekend with an angle-grinder turning a supermarket trolley into an armchair, or building a Guitar Hero game controller from scratch. Online projects show you how to make your own USB charger, extend the battery life of your laptop, or use a Mont Blanc refill to transform a £1 pen."People are passionate about all sorts of things," says Wilhelm. "From the wacky, far-out jet engines and taxidermy to the everyday stuff like how to tie your shoes or manage washing your laundry most efficiently."The projects are uploaded by users, who offer each other step-by-step advice on everything from the sinister to the charming. The extreme DIYers dare each other to create increasingly elaborate projects, posting photos and videos of near-misses and successes. The internet is perfect for this kind of experimentation; it's a place where inquisitive geeks meet friends with power-tools. All these projects have gorgeous colour photos to go with them, and the strength of interest in these extreme-DIY sites has led communities to meet offline. This year, Makezine.com held a fair in the US attended by 45,000 "makers"."Besides the skill of building and the exchange of ideas, it's a lot of fun," says Phillip Torrone, senior editor of Make magazine. "We seem to be in an era of thinking more about the things we buy, make, consume and cherish. The result of that is people making things - it's more gratifying." Scandals over rip-offs, such as the recent study that showed ink-jet printer cartridges wilfully waste more than 50 per cent of the ink (tinyurl.com/2957jw), make Torrone's DIY ethos all the more appealing.If you're the sort of clumsy oaf that regularly snaps USB keys off in their sockets, these DIY sites also offer advice on repairing consumer electronics. Wilhem's favourite DIY project is the dachshund wheelchair (tinyurl.com/ytc6bb). The DIYer who made it explains: "Our dachshund hurt his back, so for rehab we made him swim a lot, and I built this chair until he could use his back legs again."Online DIYers have an enthusiasm for science and exploration, and many are simply reacting to the low-quality of mass-produced goods, especially consumer electronics. They object to our modern throw-away culture. The DIYers also upstage technology manufacturers by demonstrating easy ways to fix what would otherwise be thrown away. "It's really more about problem-solving with more people", says Torrone.More news articles about Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply