Nasa work standards

I saw this on engadget and thought you might be interestedThese are the standards for how nasa employees have to do stuff (soldering, welding, smd, painting, etc)http://workmanship.nasa.gov/wkstds_nasa.jspAnd you might like this toohttps://www.instructables.com/id/Get-the-LED-out-Glass-Filled-LED-Lightbulb/

Topic by LinuxH4x0r   |  last reply


Free NASA Software!

From the NASA press release: NASA has released its 2017-2018 software catalog, which offers an extensive portfolio of software products for a wide variety of technical applications, all free of charge to the public, without any royalty or copyright fees. Available in both hard copy and online, this third edition of the publication has contributions from all the agency’s centers on data processing/storage, business systems, operations, propulsion and aeronautics. It includes many of the tools NASA uses to explore space and broaden our understanding of the universe. A number of software packages are being presented for release for the first time. Each catalog entry is accompanied with a plain language description of what it does. “The software catalog is our way of supporting the innovation economy by granting access to tools used by today’s top aerospace professionals to entrepreneurs, small businesses, academia and industry,” said Steve Jurczyk, associate administrator for NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) in Washington. “Access to these software codes has the potential to generate tangible benefits that create American jobs, earn revenue and save lives.” NASA published the first edition of its software catalog in April 2014, becoming the first comprehensive listing of publicly available software to be compiled by a federal government agency -- the largest creator of custom code. Since then, NASA has shared thousands of its software programs with students, industry, individuals and other government agencies. “Software has been a critical component of each of NASA’s mission successes and scientific discoveries. In fact, more than 30 percent of all reported NASA innovations are software,” said Dan Lockney, NASA’s Technology Transfer program executive. “We’re pleased to transfer these tools to other sectors and excited at the prospect of seeing them implemented in new and creative ways.” The searchable catalogue is here: https://software.nasa.gov Wouldn't it be cool to use NASA code in your next project? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JIpyc8AfMZY

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


NASA Plans To Visit The Sun

The name of the mission is Solar Probe+ (pronounced "Solar Probe plus"). It's a heat-resistant spacecraft designed to plunge deep into the sun's atmosphere where it can sample solar wind and magnetism first hand. Launch could happen as early as - (continued here)

Topic by bumpus   |  last reply



Prepare for Launch!

NASA is making preparing for launch seem far too easy with this series of how-to images. I've been trying to launch a shuttle all morning, but I can't help feel that they are leaving something out. Link via Boing Boing

Topic by randofo 


NASA style outdoor countdown clock

My problem;  as a father of two young girls, for years I have joked about getting NASA's countdown clock and placing it on our yard when they begin to date.  And start cleaning my largest guns when the clock hits @ 15 minutes or so.  Originally I thought this would be cost prohibitive- I mean, the thing is huge, and they used tax dollars to pay for it, so how cheap could it be?  Reading online about it today, I see it's been in use since the Apollo days, and it uses 40 watt bulbs, so I'm thinking (pardon the pun here), it can't be rocket science.  I don't need this to be in scale, but Id like something view able from the street, rather than a kitchen timer kind of thing.  And while I'm handy with a skill saw, I'm more of a car guy than a computer geek, so I don't even know where to start.  Ideally, I guess Id like the numbers somewhere around 12" or so, maybe larger.  Any thoughts, or experience?  The oldest starts dating in less than a week... 

Topic by Mr.Camaro 


Will a magnet work in space? Answered

Will a magnet work in space, if so, will its strength be affected making it seem stronger or weaker?

Question by Kaptain Kool   |  last reply


NASA/JPL SAY THEY CAN NOW REACH PLUTO FASTER BECAUSE ? Answered

Listening to a Science Friday discussion of Pluto's 150 mile deep ocean, there was an offhand mention that we can now get a probe there faster because of some astrophysics technology. Pluto is now considered a miniature planet. Anybody know what this relatively new space probe speed travel technology is ?

Question by iceng   |  last reply


How to rockets stabilize themselves with little or no fins? Answered

I just thought of NASA's satellite carrying rockets and realized they have almost no visible stabilizers. I wondered how they were able to fly relatively straight. Do they move the output of exhaust or something like that?

Question by temp   |  last reply


Could a miniature plasma reactor be possible?

If so what gasses should be used and what gauss magnets should be used to help contain the plasma? I also would like to know how much energy it would feasibly produce and if that energy would be more than the amount put in. Finally, what coils besides a field coil should be used?

Question by nerd7473   |  last reply


The Ultimate Water-Powered Rocket!

NASA and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) have launched a water-powered rocket 1300 feet into the atmosphere!The rocket was actually propelled by a frozen mixture of "nanoscale aluminium" (isn't that "dust"?) and water, pumped in at the consistency of toothpaste and then frozen in place. The propellant is known as ALICE (aluminium and ice - convenient, eh?)Earlier this month, the collaborative team, Drs. Steven F. Son and Tim Pourpoint of Purdue, Rich Yetter and Grant Risha of Penn State, Vigor Yang of Georgia Tech, Harold Bell and Frank Bauer of NASA, and Mitat Birkan and Thomas Russell of AFOSR watched as the rocket soared high into the sky, to 1300 feet near Purdue University.ALICE is generating excitement among the researchers because it has the potential to replace some liquid or solid propellants. It is a promising propellant energetically. Theoretically, when it is optimized, it could have a higher performance than a conventional propellant. In addition, because of the abundance and easy handling of the raw materials, ALICE could potentially become the propellant of choice for missions leaving other planets, since it could be (relatively) easy to manufacture from local raw materials and far easier to store than cryogenic fuels. Story from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base via Rocket Dungeon.Video found by Jeff-O

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Best way to cut corrugated plastic?

On the day after the elections, I collected a bunch of corrugated plastic political signs that were going to be recycled. My plan is to turn them into a small geodesic dome, similar Nasa’s Hi-Seas dome for my daughter to conduct scientific missions in the backyard.Is the easiest way to cut these signs into the necessary triangles with a razor and a straight edge? Can I use a circular saw or skill saw to cut them faster or cut multiples at once?

Question by Erfunden 


UFO sighting at my local air show?

I went to my local air show in Cleveland and I actually saw  a shark like figure floating around in the sky it almost looked like a flying fish but backward. It looked as tho it was actually flapping a tail around to fly. After it was way off in the distance I took some pictures of it that hardly compare to the first ones as tho it actually morphed into a more bird like object I was wondering if any one had any opinions on these bazar photos I and my brother took. I will admit im the type to believe in these objects being from other planets, I have seen Videos on Youtube stolen from nasa that resemble this "Thing"  quite closely.

Question by the_burrito_master   |  last reply


Is it possible to survive a fall through the center of the earth? Answered

Okay, LOTS of supposing here. So lets suppose someone dug a hole through the center of the earth, and managed to cover up the sides of the hole with a magma resistant cover of some sort. You start out by getting one of the spacesuits from nasa and decide to jump in the hole. Would you survive? I know that a human in the open sky diving position will go about 200 km/h, and I believe a space suit can survive up to 250 degrees fahrenheit. Please tell me how you came to that conclusion because it's been killing me how to figure it out. And also please include any formulas that are used, they're good to know!

Question by a_traceur   |  last reply


Tiltrotor UAV?

So, a friend and I were looking at something NASA published a while ago. It was a call for a tiltrotor craft that could carry 55 people, could land either in water or on land, and could suck up water for use in firefighting. It was also meant to be a civilian craft. Anyway, we started to get an idea in our heads about designing some sort of tiltrotor rc thing or perhaps a UAV. We're both mechanical engineering majors and have some experience with aerodynamics, programming, electronics systems and rc aircraft. I was wondering if anyone had some good suggestions as to the design of this. One of the things we weren't quite sure about was what we would use for a power supply. Appreciate the help. *Note, if we actually build anything it will only be a small scale proof of concept prototype built from inexpensive parts.

Question by SG1Oniell   |  last reply


Could a coil gun's projectile escape earth's gravity?

If there were a Coil Gun, that was built to go across the United States and Canada border, for 2000km in a horizontal line, that would end at the end of a 'tunnel,' the projectile should hit escape velocity 11.2km/s and be out of the earth's gravity's field?Coil gun launch cost964 MEGA watts 10 cents per kwh (wholesale) from a power station$9,640,000.00 per launchNASA Space Shuttle launch costhttp://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/about/information/shuttle_faq.html#10Q. How much does it cost to launch a Space Shuttle? A. The average cost to launch a Space Shuttle is about $450 million per missionhttps://www.instructables.com/answers/Space-Elevator-or-Lateral-Coil-Gun/

Question by nfarrow   |  last reply


Looking to replace LEDs with solenoid driven indicators.

I'd really like to replace some LED indicators with physical on/off indicators, like they used on old NASA spacecraft. To see what I'm talking about take a look at this console from Apollo 14 at the little windows above the switches at the center left. The top row is all "barber poll" the bottom row open.My initial thought is that I could possibly replace the LEDs with a solenoid that would shove an "on" indicator into a little window when powered, and retract it when powered down.The problem: I know next to nothing about solenoids and don't know if this is feasible. They'd need at least 1/4" throw and to run at low power if they're going to simply be a drop-in replacement for LEDs. What kind of solenoid am I looking for and does it even exist?

Question by Grathio   |  last reply


Rural Internet?

I am sure that from the title many know what I am about to say.  I need fast rural internet.  Now I have seen huge's net, wildblue, and starband.  The problem is that the first two offer puny download/upload limits.  I am not the kind of person who checks my email and that is it.  I wan't to host servers, stream movies and watch HD youtube.  Yea these satellite companies offer great download speeds, especially starband which I haven't seen a cap for, but the upload speeds are HORRIBLE, worse than what I have now which is really bad.  Now this is obvious because your sending information to SPACE.  So can I maybe get an aftermarket transmitter that is like NASA grade or something.  Or do I need to find a down to earth method to do this.  I live in the middle of nowhere so there is really no other way I don't think.  Do you have any ideas or services you would recommend.

Question by jj.inc   |  last reply


I need ideas so I was wondering if you, the community of instructables could help me with a new instructable idea, WHAT? Answered

Alright so I mainly focus around hacks and recovering from hacks is there anybody out there who has an idea on what I could make a new instructable for? Try not to make it too too hard like, how to hack NASA or something please. That has 2 things wrong with it, 1. ILLEGAL, 2. HARD! I could make some on files that can trick your victim into thinking he has to reinstall windows and stuff like that, it would be nice for some ideas that I know would get some views from the community. BEST ANSWER GETS A FREE MESSAGE ON HOW TO _____ YOU GET TO CHOOSE, of course I need to know how so I might reply cant in which case you can send me a different message!

Question by warspyking   |  last reply


Voyager 2 probe leaves the neighborhood

Http://www.nature.com/news/2007/071210/full/news.2007.365.htmlOn 30 August, NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft -- which has been sailing through space since 1977 -- crossed the "termination shock", the boundary between the bubble in space dominated by the solar wind coming from the Sun and the transition region beyond that lies between Earth and interstellar space.Voyager 2's twin, Voyager 1, crossed this same boundary in December 2004. But Voyager 2 did it while almost 1 billion miles closer to the Sun, suggesting that something -- such as an interstellar magnetic field -- is compressing the bubble of the solar wind on that side. The twin Voyagers headed out of the solar system in different directions, with Voyager 1 taking a northern path and Voyager 2 a southern one."Now both spacecraft are in the final frontier of the solar system," says project scientist Edward Stone, of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "We've reached another major milestone in our 30 years of discovery." He and other Voyager scientists presented their findings on Monday at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Hacker to be extradited to America

A Briton accused of hacking into top secret military computers has lost a Law Lords appeal against being extradited to stand trial in the US.Glasgow-born Gary McKinnon could face life in jail if convicted of accessing 97 US military and Nasa computers.He has admitted breaking into the computers from his London home but said he was seeking information on UFOs. Link to BBC website.According to McKinnon (in the video included in the article), he used a simple password hack ("blank password scanning") to look for UFO-related technology. In response, the US are using (abusing?) anti-terrorism laws to extradite McKinnon for trial.If found guilty, McKinnon could face life in jail. American officials involved in this case have stated that they want to see him "fry".Controversy abounds in this case:Britain has no choice regarding the extradition, because they have signed a treaty with America regarding the extradition of terrorist suspects. America, however, has yet to sign the treaty they are exploiting in this case.If an American citizen committed the same offenses against UK military computers, the US would prevent the extradition of their citizen anyway, because they are protected by the constitution.The case is being prosecuted retrospectively - when McKinnin hacked the military computers, there was no treaty, and his actions were not considered an offense.The US is (allegedly) using the same anti-terrorism treaty (the one they haven't signed) to force the extradition of around 200 UK citizens, mostly for non-terrorist offenses (such as financial crimes).

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Homes Protected from Raging Forest Fires

Every year we hear about countless homes being destroyed by forest fires. Unfortunately, the public isn’t aware that our current level of technology can readily address this problem. I have been examining a concept that has intrigued me over the past decade and which I call a “fire shield”. This shield functions by completely enveloping a private home and protecting it against encroaching forest fires. We’re talking about protection against a blazing fire storm generating high speed winds and flames in excess of 100 MPH. The shield would be a flexible structure that easily inflates like a balloon (needing perhaps three people for a day to erect) and forms a protective hemispherical, shell-like dome over the home (Fig-1). The structure would be impervious to penetration by high speed flames and their intense radiant heat, thereby keeping the enveloped home safe, cooled and protected. Each home would require a pre-fitted, customized buildup of a number of pre-built modular, balloon-like segments. They are manufactured and then assembled over the house only once, to get a customized tailored fit, then taken down and stored, and thereafter are ready to be deployed within a day’s advance notice of an encroaching forest fire. The Fire-Shield would be a modular, portable, inflated dome like those used for indoor tennis, which is prepared and custom-fitted to be later erected within a day. While typical inflated domes have their entire inner volume pressurized, our Fire-Shield will only require pressurizing a small volume contained between its double-walled structure that forms the dome as shown in Fig-1. The surface of its outer material uses NASA's radiatively reflective, aluminized Mylar to ward off the intense radiant heat of a fire storm. In addition this surface gets protected against the 100 – 150 MPH fire-winds, which are ready to impinge upon it, by injecting a high speed film of air (just like gas-turbine blades) produced by portable blowers. The actual heat-shield contains multiple, redundant pockets of cells directing the flow of air to both film-cool its surface and protect the shield against direct flame contact. Each major modular segment would contain its own portable, gasoline powered wind generator to supply the airflow. Depending upon home-size, several of these modules would be easily connected using Velcro plus redundant snaps and safety-stays. The shield gets attached over chimney tops and to pre-installed, grounded cement-posts, plus strategic hooks about the outside of the house. Special, inflated pillows are also strategically placed (between the shield and the house exterior) to facilitate the formation of a hemispherical shield that envelopes and protects our home against a high speed fire-storm. The Fire-Shield Design Concept The concept for a fire shield went through a gestation period of several decades as my career in thermo/fluids evolved. It started with the design of jet engine turbine cooling to thermal control of satellites, and finally to designing radiant heat barriers for cryogenics. These activities enabled receiving a score of patents as well. These activities inspired the concept for a rapidly deployable Fire-Shield to protect homes against a raging forest fire. The idea requires integrating several technologies ranging from inflatable commercial air domes to jet engine cooling to radiatively cooled spacecraft. Also included are flexible material coatings developed by NASA that radiatively reflects high temperature heat, making the deployable Fire-Shield a viable concept. Two key design principles are employed to protect both the heat shield and the home it envelopes. The first is shown in Fig-2 and uses a high speed film of air (faster than the anticipated fire-storm flame speeds of 100 – 150 MPH) that is locally directed to blow over the shield’s surface, cooling it and protecting it just like the metal turbine blades of jet-engines. The temperature of speeding flames impinging upon a jet engine’s metallic turbine blades is hot enough to easily melt them, yet the blades are protected by using this film cooling technology. The same technology will protect the heat-shield from meltdown when high speed flames of 100+ MPH attempt to impinge upon its surface. The second principle protects the shield against the intense radiant heat coming from a blazing forest fire where temperatures can exceed 2000 F. While this radiant heat does not physically touch the shield, as would a fire-storm’s flames, its presence is “felt” and is as deadly as the hot flames that would normally scrub over the shield without our film-cooling. We use a radiatively reflective, thermal coating barrier that repels this radiant heatload and protects the shield from melting. Such coatings were originally developed by NASA to protect satellites and spacecraft. The coating gets applied to the shield’s outer domed surface and will reflect better than 97% of all intensive radiant heatloads that are incident upon the dome’s surface. (Patent Pending; Original Concept Documented in 2006)  

Topic by RT-101 


PCB fab lab questions? (and nixie tubes?) Answered

Now that I have a new oscilloscope (rigol DS1054Z), and have learned a LOT about programming and electronics while down at NASA langley for a research program (semi-intern), I feel like I should start working on a real project (other than my quadcopter), and was thinking about making a nixie tube clock. I would like to make it from scratch of my own design as I feel one learned the most about electronics by not using other's designs. However, I do not have the resources or time to bother trying to etch my own PCB. I attempted that before and was not able to get usable results. What kind of costs am I looking at if I locate a relatively local company for the job? I hate calling people and companies, but I suppose that is still the most practical way to figure out what I need to do and place an order, I don't know. Economies of scale is a great thing, makes things in bulk production cheap! However, would the costs of ordering one or 2 PCBs be non-economical and/or non-practical? Should I consider many smaller projects and stuff to be created on a breakout board? I hate messy, sloppy protoboard, it is just nasty, though easy for non-high-density boards. however, I would love to hear the opinions of others for these things. When dealing with nixie tubes, are sockets for the 1N-14 avalible? A lot of the new old stocks seem to have very thin and long legs, almost as if they are meant for through hole soldering directly onto a PCB like capacitors and resistors. I would prefer a socketed tube to make replacing them quicker and easier. 

Question by -max-   |  last reply


Watch out for falling satellites

Watch out for falling satellitesWith no one at the wheel, should we be worried about the large US spy satellite now headed for a crash landing?US spy satellite 193 is predicted to de-orbit less than gracefully in Feburary or early March. The chances of it actually hitting a populated area are exceedingly small, but perhaps you can catch a few micrograms of it using Kiteman's How to catch a star Instructable.What is happening?An out-of-control US spy satellite will crash to Earth in the coming months, government officials say. The satellite is large enough that remnants are likely to survive atmospheric re-entry and strike the Earth, sometime in late February or early March, says Gordon Johndroe, a spokesman for the National Security Council.Is that normal?"This is relatively routine in that satellites de-orbit all the time," says Johndroe. Pieces of uncontrolled debris heavier than two tonnes -- mostly discarded rocket stages -- crash to Earth as often as once every three weeks, says Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer and launch observer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts.Many discarded pieces retain some power, so that controllers on Earth can guide them to a point far from human habitation, usually using a final dive into an ocean. In 2001, Russian space officials broke up the old Mir space station in this way over the South Pacific. That's not the case for this US one, however."Obviously, we want to take a look at the potential for it to land in a populated area," says Johndroe.What are the chances of it crashing through my roof?Exceedingly slim, says McDowell. Remember that some 70% of the Earth is water, and most lands are void of people. "There is no reason for people to get alarmed about it," he says.According to the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office, there have been no confirmed instances of serious property damage or injury caused by crashing debris in 40 years.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Food Creator and dispensor

This project is currently in the research stage. Having been reading the books 'Zero to Maker' by David Lang (OpenROV) and 'The Toaster Project' by Thomas Thwaites I have realised what I need is a project with a goal to take me out of the Arduino blinky light and solder kit zone, in to real making/hacking. Lang suggests an 'Unknown Project' which as I understand it is one that has been unexplored or under-explored, and he also suggests that using a popular forum to log, share and discus ideas would help the process along. So my idea, is an open hardware food creating machine, that will produce a large array of food, from a limited array of ingredients (approx 50) that can be made easily, and a ingredient markup language. 3d food printers in current development are either impractical or unappealing to me. They range from candy makers, ones that still need to be hand finished and cooked or the one publicised for receiving NASA funding recently used dead bugs. They seem all to focus on the gimmick, and not the food, and I like food. The other approach is the barbots, which seem to mostly perform flawlessly, but are unable to produce food. So my approach is to work through the process logically and break it down to sub projects. Design meals by hand using the limited ingredients for proof of concept, choose the ingredients to provide the widest possible range of nutrients and transpose the recipies to psudocode that can be easilly transformed in to a markup language later. Design a process for mixing and cooking ingredients. I envision a system of different food processors, steamers, boilers etc. and a range of extruding dies. Design a self cleaning system. Possibly ultrasonic or ionic. To that end, here is my preliminary list of ingredients. sugar, salt, oil, water, co2,Alcohol 37.5%,pectin,bicarb,nutritional yeast coffee,tea,mint,cocoa,garlic,oregano,chilli powder, paprika rice,soya,corn,wheat lemon extract,orange extract,tomato powder,dried apple,dried carrots,dried peas,potato powder. These ingredients can be used to make among other things, sausages, burgers, curry's, pasta, fries, soups, cereals, 'cider', cocktails, deserts, sodas, sauces, egg cheese and milk substitutes. So that's my plan. What do you guy think, and what ingredients would you add and why? And what would you call it? There are loads of things I left out as everything will change as I work through the process. Thanks for reading, Haydn

Topic by HaydnJones   |  last reply


Is it worth dropping $400 on a really nice oscilloscope (Rigol DS1054Z)?

I will describe my situation: I am a hobbiest that likes to make cool projects, and plan to get into maybe RF analog stuff, (maybe start out with making a few FM bugs, reverse engineer a simple video transmitter kit, and a few other things.) as well get into arduino some more, AC analysis (learn about Xformers, power factor, maybe some math, etc.) and I so currently have an old 2ch. 30MHz analog oscilloscope that is a PITA to make real measurements with. Not only is it huge and takes up a lots of space, but also I'm not even sure it is in cal!) I will be transferring into UVA (or maybe VT) for EE, and gone this summer for a NASA internship at langley. (maybe I will be able to take it with me w/ a toolbox of some electronics stuff!) The scope I am looking at (what appears to be what many subscribers seem to use, and/or claim is pretty good) is the Rigol DS1054Z. I only know how to use my $30 30MHz BKprecision scope I got on craigslist from the son of a father who was a TV repairman, and have NO experience with the use of the fancy-shmancy digital scope! What little I know is from watching EEVblog review of other scopes in the past. (I do know that they can be useful for 'capturing' waveforms, and can be set up to trigger on a pulse, maybe a certain digital codes, and that could come in handy for reverse engineering crap.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7v-tFYbc7h8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2qdtQkBKhc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETCOhzU1O5A https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gStNYfqMXk What sells it to me, being a complete newbie to electronics and digital scopes is that it has a nice big screen, the specs seem good (other certainly think, I have no intuition of what any of those things mean except the bandwidth, and maybe the sampling rate, 1GSa/s), 4 channels, intensity graded display, and it has loads of functions and stuff for me to grow into, and hacking it to make it think it is a DS1104Z is tempting, but I probably will not do that right away. Maybe once I feel what it offered is limiting. The deal breakers is the $400 price, a bit steep for me (cheap for something this good, apparently but still.), the fear that by the time I really start using it, it will be obsolete and the same money can buy some quantum super duper ASIC tech whiz bang 3GHz 100Gsa/s 1GB segmented memory spectacular scope! I am not really sure if it has a source, or signal generator either. Some sources claim that higher end ones do, or certain models anyway, and it seems like the official site say's no. http://www.rigolna.com/products/digital-oscilloscopes/ds1000Z/ds1054z/ That brings me to my next point. Should I also get a decent function generator? 

Question by -max-   |  last reply


Is it worth dropping $400 on a shiny new Rigol DS1054Z scope?

I will describe my situation: I am a hobbiest that likes to make cool projects, and plan to get into maybe RF analog stuff, (maybe start out with making a few FM bugs, reverse engineer a simple video transmitter kit, and a few other things.) as well get into arduino some more, AC analysis (learn about Xformers, power factor, maybe some math, etc.) and I so currently have an old 2ch. 30MHz analog oscilloscope that is a PITA to make real measurements with. Not only is it huge and takes up a lots of space, but also I'm not even sure it is in cal!) I will be transferring into UVA (or maybe VT) for EE, and gone this summer for a NASA internship at langley. (maybe I will be able to take it with me w/ a toolbox of some electronics stuff!)   The scope I am looking at (what appears to be what many subscribers seem to use, and/or claim is pretty good) is the Rigol DS1054Z. I only know how to use my $30 30MHz BKprecision scope I got on craigslist from the son of a father who was a TV repairman, and have NO experience with the use of the fancy-shmancy digital scope! What little I know is from watching EEVblog review of other scopes in the past. (I do know that they can be useful for 'capturing' waveforms, and can be set up to trigger on a pulse, maybe a certain digital codes, and that could come in handy for reverse engineering crap.)   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7v-tFYbc7h8   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2qdtQkBKhc   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETCOhzU1O5A   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gStNYfqMXk     What sells it to me, being a complete newbie to electronics and digital scopes is that it has a nice big screen, the specs seem good (other certainly think, I have no intuition of what any of those things mean except the bandwidth, and maybe the sampling rate, 1GSa/s), 4 channels, intensity graded display, and it has loads of functions and stuff for me to grow into, and hacking it to make it think it is a DS1104Z is tempting, but I probably will not do that right away. Maybe once I feel what it offered is limiting.   The deal breakers is the $400 price, a bit steep for me (cheap for something this good, apparently but still.), the fear that by the time I really start using it, it will be obsolete and the same money can buy some quantum super duper ASIC tech whiz bang 3GHz 100Gsa/s 1GB segmented memory spectacular scope!   I am not really sure if it has a source, or signal generator either. Some sources claim that higher end ones do, or certain models anyway, and it seems like the official site say's no. http://www.rigolna.com/products/digital-oscilloscopes/ds1000Z/ds1054z/ That brings me to my next point. Should I also get a decent function generator?   

Question by -max-   |  last reply


Graffiti artists replicate The Matrix on Instructables.com--and win $15,000 Universal Laser Cutter!

Instructables and Universal Laser are happy to announce that the incredibly creative Instructable, How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) has won the Grand Prize in the 2008 Instructables.com and Universal Laser Cutter Contest: a 40-watt VersaLaser laser cutter valued at over $15,000!Grand Prize Winner How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) provides an extremely detailed Instructables tutorial on how to build a cheap, portable special-effects rig to create "bullet-time" animations--a technique, popularized in The Matrix movies, where the audience's point-of-view moves around the scene at normal speed while the action on screen is slowed down."We want to inspire great ideas and provide skills, tools, and shared know-how," Instructables CEO Eric Wilhelm explained. "This project represents exactly what we're trying to achieve with Instructables."The DIY Bullet Time Instructable was created and documented by the Graffiti Research Lab, an open-source urban art and communication collective supported by the Free Art & Technology Lab, a Brooklyn-based non-profit research lab creating work at the intersection of popular culture and the public domain."This will be the cornerstone of our new lab space," said GRL member fi5e. "A whole crew of creative people are really excited to put this thing to use! Thanks for helping us bring the VersaLaser to Brooklyn."The winner was chosen by votes from Instructables users and our panel of expert judges, who reviewed the 14 finalists drawn from a pool of over 600 entries. Congratulations to fi5e and everyone at the GRL - we know you'll really put the VersaLaser to work, and can't wait to see what great things you make! First Prize(in alphabetical order) Autonomous Foosball Table Blu-Ray Laser Phaser! Build a Greenland Kayak Build a Wind Harp! Build yourself a portable home - a mongolian yurt Extreme Business Cards Giant Fresnel Lens Deathray How I built a carbon bike frame at home (and a bamboo frame too) How to Make a TRON Style Lamp: The MADYLIGHT How to build a sit down driving arcade cabinet Laser cutter, start slicing stuff for under 50 dollars Laser Image Projector The Spiral Data Tato -- A Curiously Complex Origami CD Case Second Prize The authors of these Instructables win a robot t-shirt and a laser-etched plaque. Listed in alphabetical order. 30 minute USB microscope The Ambience Enhancer Autonomous, Wirelessly Controlled Hovercraft Conductive Glue And Conductive Thread: Make an LED Display and Fabric Circuit That Rolls Up. Cool Wave Ring Dollar Store Parabolic Mic Handcut inlay A Home Power Plant - Wind Power Generator Revised How to Make a Color-Changing Lighted Faux Fur Scarf How to make a pair of Angel Wings How to Make an OAWR (Obstacle Avoiding Walking Robot) Make DIY Vanilla Extract "Quicksilver" Retro-Future Scooter from appliances and scrap metal Solid Wood Digital Clock The Stirling Engine, absorb energy from candles, coffee, and more! Squishy Breast Stress Relief Toy TiggerBot II Robot Tube Amp Rebuild (and Mod) U-Disp - The Digg (tm) display (Open Source)Wooden Gear Clock Expert JudgesTo help us judge, we assembled an amazing team of expert designers, engineers, hackers, journalists, scientists, technologists, and other really smart people. They spent hours examining each of the finalists Instructables and helping us make a decision. We'd like to send a huge "Thank You" to each of our incredible judges. We couldn't have done it without you.Violet Blue (author, blogger, podcaster, columnist, and SRL vet)Gareth Branwyn (Contributing Editor, MAKE Magazine)Zoz Brooks (Host, of the upcoming TV Show Prototype This)Joe Brown (Editor, Wired Magazine)Colin Bulthaup (CTO of Potenco, co-founder Squid Labs) David Calkins (Co-founder of RoboGames) Julia Cosgrove (Deputy Editor, ReadyMade Magazine)Chris Csikszentmihalyi (Professor at the MIT Media Lab, Computing Culture Group)Simone Davalos (Co-founder of RoboGames) Lenore Edman (Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories)Dan Goldwater (Founder of monkeylectric, co-founder Squid Labs)Saul Griffith (President of Makani Power, co-founder Squid Labs, MacArthur Fellow)Duncan Haberly (Instructables)Matthew Hancher (NASA Researcher in the Intelligent Systems Division)Brian Lam (Editor, Gizmodo)Ed Lewis (Instructables)Jeffrey McGrew (Designer, Because We Can)Chuck Messer (Tackle Design, The Open Prosthetics Project, host of Discovery's Smash Lab)Megan Miller (Editor, PopSci)Jim Newton (Founder of TechShop)Quinn Norton (Journalist)Windell Oskay (Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories)David Pescovitz (BoingBoing, Institute for the Future, MAKE Magazine)Cloude Porteus (Instructables)Randy Sarafan (Instructables, Eyebeam Resident)Peter Semmelhack (Founder of Buglabs)Tyghe Trimble (News Editor, Discover Magazine)Noah Weinstein (Instructables)Eric Wilhelm (CEO of Instructables, co-founder Squid Labs)Dan Woods (Associate Publisher, MAKE Magazine) For the full information on how the winners were chosen, click here.

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