airborne Micro generator from nitro rc 40 motor / 400kv outrunner / smart charger / lipoly

Concept : design onboard lipoly charger system to extend flight time on giant scale electric plane.  1) if this is even a worth while project, the trade off of course is weight / power ,      can enough be created from a micro generator to make a differance, or would additionals 6 cell lipoy be more sensible ,  configuration =   OS max 40 nitro motor /  brushless 400 kv outrunner / ac / dc conversion rectifier / dc voltage regulator / 12v dc lipoly balance charger to main bank of lipoly batteries /  motors 2) I don't know how to build the rectifier bridge, so I would need some direction  Any suggestions or thoughts on this project are appreciated.  Jeff

Topic by JeffR135 


Is a CRT electron gun any use?

Is it worth it to take the electron gun out of a CRT when salvaging parts? I've seen people remove the electron gun when they take apart the CRT but I don't know what they'd use it for. What can you do with a CRT electron gun? What chemicals does the gun contain? (I know the screen has toxic phosphor and stuff but I'm talking about the gun itself). Also, is it safe to vent a CRT tube? I have found that you should vent the CRT tube before working on it, by smashing the end from a distance, so that it won't implode if you happen to break it when working on it. But is it safe to puncture open the tube? There are toxic phosphors inside and I worry that venting it could cause toxic chemicals to go airborne.

Question by poiihy   |  last reply


World's smallest (manned) helicopter ready for a spin.

Those of us who've been dreaming of cheap personal air travel in the Buck Rogers, sci-fi jet-pack mode should turn their eyes towards Vinci, Italy on May 25. That's when Gennai Yanagisawa, inventor of the tiny GEN H-4 personal helicopter, will be taking his lightweight 165-pound whirly-gig on a demonstration flight.Why Vinci? According to the 75-year-old Yanagisawa, "Since the concept of our helicopter came from Italy, I always wanted to take a flight in the birthplace of da Vinci." Indeed, Leonardo's famous notebook drawings from 1493 show an "ornithopter" with a screw-like rotor. Like da Vinci's pioneering design, Yanagisawa's GEN H-4 has no tail. Instead, twin counter-rotating propellers cancel out the torque that requires single-rotor helicopters to have a perpendicular tail rotor.The GEN H-4 personal helicopter is actually available for purchase now, though Yanagisawa's company (located in the Japanese city of Matsumoto) has so far sold only six (2 in the USA).The cost for one is a reasonable $58,250 and once airborne, the GEN H-4 can fly at a somewhat sedate speed of 31 mph - slow yes, but probably faster than rush hour traffic. Veni, vidi, volanti!It's the perfect commuter vehicle! Land on the roof of your office block, maybe it folds up, but certainly just push it into the corner to make space for your workmates to land. Sure, it only does 31mph, but it can go in a straight line, over the stationary traffic.Story on InventorSpot

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply