Positions available at Instructables (October 19, 2018)

Working at InstructablesIf you don't see an open position that fits you, please don't hesitate to drop us a line and say hi. We are always actively building our network of curious, creative talent with a passion for making. To introduce yourself, please send your cover letter and resume to auctoramentum at instructables dot com with a fun, robot-related subject line

Topic by ewilhelm 


Engineering Career Choice ??? Renewable Energy/ Electronic Answered

Hello I have a big choice with my career. I am not sure what to choose between electronic and renewable energy engineering. Could you please help me if you can. Thanks

Question by mechatr0nix   |  last reply


Biotechnology

I have to right a paragraph on biotechnology for school so I wanted to know if some of you could help me because I am having a hard time. - What is biotechnology? - What are the duties of the person in this career? - What education background does a person need? - What is the possible salary a person could earn? - Who employs a biotechnology person? -What is interesting about this career? Help is very much appreciated. Thank you Patrick Sowers

Topic by Pat Sowers   |  last reply


How can I dress up as a space scientist?

I am doing a careers project for school. I am researching being a space scientist. As a part of my presentation, I have to dress up as my career. My only idea is wearing a shirt from the science fair with a rocket on it and a lab coat, but I am not sure whether or not space scientists wear lab coats. Any ideas would be very much appreciated!

Question by cupcake811   |  last reply


Which engineering discipline is most worthwhile to major in? (mechatronics and nano included) Answered

 I am a student from Canada and I enjoy math physics and logic in general, some programs have a specialized 1st year so I'm wondering which discipline would be most useful in terms of enjoyment career options and pay.  So far I'm leaning towards Mechatronics at Waterloo and Mechanical at UBC and Queens (for those of you familiar with Canadian Universities) 

Question by ducktape1   |  last reply


Need a list of the best tools, e-books & tuts, ide's etc. for embedded systems and devices development

Hello Everybody!!! I Just recently dedicated myself and career to the development and design of embedded systems, devices and technology. I just wanted to know if anybody had a list or a link of the most essential tools and other resources to help learn and develop a highly efficient setup and environment for this field of study and employment. Thank You AO!

Topic by Da_Real_ApacheOmega   |  last reply


Bob Pease is dead

Bob Pease, the Analog design engineer who, while working for National Semiconductors,  developed devices like the LM317 regulator amongst many others, died yesterday in a car crash in Silicon Valley. Bob was a legendary figure to any engineer working in the analog domain. He died leaving the memorial service for another legend, Jim WIlliams of Linear technology, who died of a massive stroke last week. Bob was one of the nicest guys in the business, and mentored dozens of engineers in his long career.

Topic by steveastrouk   |  last reply


Beginning Robotics-- Where Should I Start?

Hello, as you can tell from my profile, I have a passion for robots.  I'd like to have a career in developing artificial intelligence in particular, and I would like to start sharpening my skills now.  Unfortunately, I'm not sure where to start. I was wondering if someone could give me an idea where to start out, as well as if someone could provide a link to a C compiler (preferably free).  Thank you very much for any help.

Topic by StarscreamClone   |  last reply


How do I shop for high powered microscopes on a budget without getting a bad quality one?

I don't want to spend tons, (I'm thinking I can do about $250 max) and want a high-powered microscope. I would really like it to be bifocal (not stereo). I'd prefer at least a max of 1000x, if not 1600x. I want the microscope so that I can explore the world around me. Oh, and I'm considering certain biological fields for my career. Thanks guys!

Question by ScarecrowGnome   |  last reply


Want a job building spaceships?

I know a few people here are ready to start looking for a "proper" job.Assuming you don't get your dream job at The Tower, there's a strong second-choice: building spaceships.Scaled Composites (Burt Rutan's company that built SpaceShipOne and Global Flyer) are looking to hire all sorts of people on all sorts of jobs. Some sound genuinely exciting, and some even state they will be working on SpaceShipTwo.Scaled is looking for people that like to build things with their hands and are good craftspeople. Must enjoy a fast-paced R&D; environment and enjoy working in a team atmosphere. Entry-level through experienced persons needed.See that? Entry-level through experienced persons needed - that's all of you, chaps.http://www.scaled.com/http://www.scaled.com/careers/index.html

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Cystic Fibrosis patient needs an inexpensive respirator generator

My daughter with cystic fibrosis, uses a "bio vest system" that includes the vest with hoses that attach to a generator which weighs about 50 lbs. Hillrom makes a 17 lb vest system (www.thevest.com) but it costs $16,000.00. I don't understand why it has to cost so much. We can't afford the 17 lb version. My daughter who has just graduated from college and wants to travel in her career is faced with not taking her vest along with her for weeks at a time because she can't handle carrying the heavier version on and off planes, trains, etc. This leaves her without getting her breathing treatments. Is there a solution to this problem? Can the bio-vest be made any cheaper so that everyone can have the 17 lb version??

Topic by teachermom   |  last reply


Can anyone give me tips for Game Art? Answered

I am enrolling in a course called Game Art at TAFE SA and I know nothing about 3D modeling which, as far as I can tell, is the main part of the course. I am good at (and enjoy) both art and games so I figured this would be a good course/career path to choose. I have to submit a portfolio of original artworks including drawing, observational and digital work. Is 3D modeling difficult? Is anyone on instructables a game artist or similar profession? What works should i do for my portfolio to get the best chance of getting into the course? Do i need to know programing or difficult mathematics?  Any help will be appreciated

Question by Splicer02   |  last reply


MAC PASSWORD

Do you want to protect your Mac folders? For sure, your Mac contains all the valuable files that are not good to be shared to the WORLD. You need to protect your Mac folders so that other people will not have any access to your Mac folders. Don’t you know that passwords can protect your Mac folders? If you want to know how password protect folders mac, read this article. All Mac files are valuable to the Mac users. But, not all folders are meant for public viewing. You need to protect some of your Mac files and folders, especially the confidential ones from the prying eyes of the people. Some examples of confidential Mac files and folders are the career related ones. Of course, you will not waste all those sleepless night making your project just to give to other person, right? You will sure disagree that another person will take advantage on your Mac files and gain the promotion. That is a very bad idea. If you want to secure your career, you need to secure your files. Put some passwords on your Mac files/folders. MacKeeper can assure the secrecy of your Mac files. It has a Data Encryptor that will guarantee the complete privacy of your Mac files. It can hide your private data to avoid the public viewing of your files. You can have two options in securing your Mac files with MacKeeper. You can secure it with password or use the Advance Encryption Standard. It is being approved by the National Security Agency in hiding some of the top secret information. Undeniably, this is very effective. You can encrypt your files with MacKeeper and keep your secrets safe. In addition to that, you will not only enjoy the secrecy benefit of the MacKeeper. You will enjoy all its features that will keep your Mac in good health and solve problems when mac is running slow

Topic by alexandraggonzales5 


What do I need to get started in electronics?

I want to get started in electronics (for fun right now, when I'm eighteen I plan on studying computers and things like that because I would like computer repair and such to be my career) However, I know very, very little about electronics right now. I've already learned quite a bit about the more basic things just from reading some technology instructables on this site (thanks!) but to actually do the projects (mostly things involving LEDs, bots, and things like that) what types of tools do I need to have on hand? I figure I need a soldering iron, but otherwise I'm pretty clueless as to how to get started here. I learn A LOT better when things are hands on rather than reading from books so I think the projects on this site would be a good starting point. There will be plenty of time later for me to get more serious in this.  So other than a soldering iron and wires, what other things would be good for me to have on hand to get started with electronics?

Question by lennielectric   |  last reply


Chromehounds shall rise again!!! (at least I hope so)

 Hey Ibles members and random guests! As very few of you know, Chromehounds was shut down in January. Well, this left mech game lovers with two series to choose from. Armoured Core or mechwarrior. I didn't like either and loved the customization and gameplay in Chromehounds. So using the UDK (unreal development kit), I plan on remaking a basic version of chromehounds then slowly upgrading models and textures until it's basically the same as the original. But I have another reason. I am searching through career options at the moment (still in high school), and videogame design is near the top of the list. So, I'm building the game from the bottom up using Chromehounds as a basis, so I can see if this is how I want to spend a portion (or all) of my life on.     Now to the fancy images. These are the RFZ-CL-1 (tracks), RFZ-WMG-2 (Machine Guns), and M04CK Stuart (cockpit, the thing in the middle). Sorry about the brightness in the rendered image, haven't quite figured out this new renderer. All of these are mostly done but are all still WIP (work in progress).     P.S. For the techies: I used Google Sketch Up and  V-ray (renderer). pic 1: Rendered pic 2: Unrendered, exported from Sketch Up pic 3: Screenshot for accuracy comparison P.S.S. YES!!! I know the guns are different!!! The screenshots I used are from teamxbox.com, exact part numbers were from addictedgamer.com, and all models involved in this were originally created by From Software and SEGA. I just used screenshots to reconstruct them.

Topic by ry25920   |  last reply


Old Smartphone LCD as Head Mounted Display?

I've got an old HTC EVO 4G, otherwise known as the PC36100.  I'm attempting to create a 1 to 1 display to connect directly to my computer for a cheap Head Mounted Disply.  I've attempted to use various wireless RDPs.  However, the lag while attempting to do ANYTHING is horrible.  So I attempted to find an app that would connect directly to the phone via USB.  I found two.  Neither of which I feel comfortable dropping money on with such poor reviews and trials that don't work. So finally, I decided why not just use the LCD directly.  No messing with the hardware limitations of the phone at all.  So I took the phone apart.  I got right down to the LCD itself and found that it has a 17-pin input.  But, I don't really know much about it beyond that.  I can tell you that the cable reads: Career 06 94V-0 <->2 C36_FPC REV A I even have a picture of it.  I think it's attached.  If not, I'll fix that. Essentially what I want to know is, what do I need to make it be a fully working LCD monitor for my computer.  I know I'll need a module to convert the signal from what it is now to HDMI or VGA whatever the case may be.  I also know I need power to the screen.  But, beyond that, I don't know where to look.  I've tried looking up the cable information, but I'm not getting great results.  Any help in the matter, would be greatly appreciated.  Thank you.

Question by seniorfrito   |  last reply


How can I use a portable scanner with a tablet PC?

Hello, I'm trying something new: I want to completely eliminate paper (and all the messes and lost handouts that go along with it) from my high school career by using a tablet PC and a portable scanner to instantly digitize everything and keep it in one neat, organized spot. However, I'm not sure what the best way to do this is. Basically, I'm looking for a tablet that has - 6 to 8 hours of battery life to last through a day - as large of a screen as possible - the ability to view and search through PDF files - the ability to view and edit text documents (preferably with handwriting recognition) - the ability to effectively sort and organize large numbers of PDF and image files into folders that I can easily access - support for Java and Flash - WiFi - and the ability to connect with a portable scanner that can scan several pages, convert them to PDF files with text recognition, and merge them into one large document Unfortunately, there are so many tablets available on the market that I haven't been able to process everything that I'm seeing! One of the problems, however, seems to be that the new Android tablets are really nothing more than large cell phones and will not be able to interface with a portable scanner in the capacity that I want them to (using an SD card to transfer image files to my tablet from my scanner would not be enough - is there any app for text recognition, PDF conversion, and PDF merging?) while Windows 7 tablets suffer from bulkiness and short battery life. Also, from what I've read, while Windows 7 is optimized for tablet use, with multitouch compatibility and handwriting recognition, many standard Windows programs are not, making them difficult to use without a keyboard and mouse. Do any of you have advice? Thanks! Xellers

Question by Xellers   |  last reply


Hello, I have a few questions.

Hello, I've been frequenting this site for a number of years now, but have never actually posted anything. However, I am now starting up an important project, that may be little much for me, and I'm wanting to make sure I have a full understanding of the resources I'm going to need to complete the project. So I'm going to give a little background in the hopes of explaining why this project is so important. I'm a college student looking to get my associates in Application Development. I'm currently in my second quarter of classes, and am beginning the planning process for what the school is calling the "Capstone Project" (aka Senior Project). So as it stands I have about two years to, assuming everything goes well, to create a new application, and I decided I'd be a bit of an over achiever (with this project even if I'm not with others xP) and develop an AI assistant home robot based off the Japanese Gatebox (https://gatebox.ai/). I choose this because I feel it's something that really challenges all my skills, as I started my career off as an IT in the Navy specializing in System Administration, then worked as an on call computer repairmen for a year after I got out, and am now working on becoming a programmer. Now while I've done some research into, and am forming a plan for the software side, there are a few things on the physical tech side that I'm having trouble with. First, I would like to use a prism hologram, rather than a projector and clear screen, however I'm also not wanting the base to take up a large area on a desk. So I was wondering if there were any cheap projectors that could work, or if someone knows of a small screen that could allow for a somewhat tall projection? Second, as a kind of way to make my system stand out as it's own thing, I was wanting figure out a way to wirelessly (preferably over a wifi connection) to stream the image from the "Central" unit to a "Remote" unit somewhere else in the house, while on a budget. I know Wireless HDMI systems exists, however given there price I would prefer to find an alternative method. Any and all help would be appreciated.

Topic by evocure   |  last reply


Easy automated method to find chronological age of an integrated circuit design? Answered

This is not a question related to a homework or career assignment. This question is an existential question. Specifically, the thing that I am wondering if it exists, or not, is an easy and automated method for finding the chronological date, e.g. a year, Anno Domini (AD) or Common Era (CE), when a named integrated circuit (IC) was introduced.  Preferably this method exists in the form of a free resource on the Web. As an example, the well known 555 timer IC was introduced in the year 1971, and I am reasonably confident that was the year, because the Wikipedia article titled "555 timer IC", https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/555_timer_IC contains the words: "Introduced in 1971 by American company Signetics, the 555 is still in widespread use..." And I assume that statement is totally true, because if I can't trust the people who edit Wikipedia, I mean, who can I trust? ;-) Unfortunately, Wikipedia does not have a fact-filled article for almost every IC every sold.  In contrast, a place like www.alldatasheet.com has data sheets for almost every IC ever sold, but, it turns out, the data sheet does not always reveal the year the IC was introduced. To clarify this further, the thing I really want to exist, would be like a web site, with a name like: www.howoldismyic.com, or www.howoldisthisic.com, or www.icdob.com etc. (Please note that none of those URLs point to actual existing web sites, at the time of this writing.) Moreover, I am fantasizing this web site would contain a form, for to enter the name of the IC to look up, and then after hitting the "Submit" button, it would magically tell me what year that IC was introduced to the world, and maybe also which semiconductor company gave birth to it. As some example input and output, the query NE555 would return:  NE555, 1971, Signetics(r) As an additional twist to this fantasy, the query, LM555, would return the same thing, and this magical web page would like, know, that LM555 was a later version of the same IC, except produced by a different manufacturer, namely National(r); i.e LM555 was National's version of the 555 timer . If you have read this far, I congratulate you!  And I appreciate your eyeball time! If you are wondering about my motivation for this question, it is just that think the year an IC was introduced would be a very useful metric, like for answering more specific questions, like: The SG3524 and LTC3780 are ICs used for making switchmode power supplies.  Which of these ICs is more modern? I.e which IC was introduced latest? It turns out, the answer to this question is: The SG3524 is older (introduced first).  The LTC3780 is younger (introduced second). The SG3524 was introduced (I am guessing) in 1977, and that guess is based on some cryptic scribbles in a data sheet for the SG3524, published by Texas Instruments(r). The exact characters were: "SLVS077D – APRIL 1977 – REVISED FEBRUARY 2003" and I am just naively interpreting that blurb to mean the SG3524 was introduced in 1977. Regarding the LTC3780, I think it was introduced some time in the 1990s.  Looking at its datasheet, from Linear Technology(r), I could not find an obvious description of what year it was first introduced, but the first page mentions some US Patent numbers, and looking up those patent numbers, gives dates circa the early 1990s. So the LTC3780 is the younger than the SG3524. However to find that answer, I kind of had to do a bunch of reading of datasheets, and US Patent numbers, and that method took a little bit of work. My question:  Is there an easier way to find out how old (or young) an IC is?  More specifically is there an existing resource on the Web, like a free database, or a IC history site, or something where I can essentially "look up" the year an IC was introduced. By the way there is no absolutely zero urgency attached to this question.  So please answer if you feel like it,  and don't if you don't. I thank you for reading this.  My name is Jack A Lopez, and I approve of this message.

Question by Jack A Lopez   |  last reply


Homes Protected from Raging Forest Fires

Every year we hear about countless homes being destroyed by forest fires. Unfortunately, the public isn’t aware that our current level of technology can readily address this problem. I have been examining a concept that has intrigued me over the past decade and which I call a “fire shield”. This shield functions by completely enveloping a private home and protecting it against encroaching forest fires. We’re talking about protection against a blazing fire storm generating high speed winds and flames in excess of 100 MPH. The shield would be a flexible structure that easily inflates like a balloon (needing perhaps three people for a day to erect) and forms a protective hemispherical, shell-like dome over the home (Fig-1). The structure would be impervious to penetration by high speed flames and their intense radiant heat, thereby keeping the enveloped home safe, cooled and protected. Each home would require a pre-fitted, customized buildup of a number of pre-built modular, balloon-like segments. They are manufactured and then assembled over the house only once, to get a customized tailored fit, then taken down and stored, and thereafter are ready to be deployed within a day’s advance notice of an encroaching forest fire. The Fire-Shield would be a modular, portable, inflated dome like those used for indoor tennis, which is prepared and custom-fitted to be later erected within a day. While typical inflated domes have their entire inner volume pressurized, our Fire-Shield will only require pressurizing a small volume contained between its double-walled structure that forms the dome as shown in Fig-1. The surface of its outer material uses NASA's radiatively reflective, aluminized Mylar to ward off the intense radiant heat of a fire storm. In addition this surface gets protected against the 100 – 150 MPH fire-winds, which are ready to impinge upon it, by injecting a high speed film of air (just like gas-turbine blades) produced by portable blowers. The actual heat-shield contains multiple, redundant pockets of cells directing the flow of air to both film-cool its surface and protect the shield against direct flame contact. Each major modular segment would contain its own portable, gasoline powered wind generator to supply the airflow. Depending upon home-size, several of these modules would be easily connected using Velcro plus redundant snaps and safety-stays. The shield gets attached over chimney tops and to pre-installed, grounded cement-posts, plus strategic hooks about the outside of the house. Special, inflated pillows are also strategically placed (between the shield and the house exterior) to facilitate the formation of a hemispherical shield that envelopes and protects our home against a high speed fire-storm. The Fire-Shield Design Concept The concept for a fire shield went through a gestation period of several decades as my career in thermo/fluids evolved. It started with the design of jet engine turbine cooling to thermal control of satellites, and finally to designing radiant heat barriers for cryogenics. These activities enabled receiving a score of patents as well. These activities inspired the concept for a rapidly deployable Fire-Shield to protect homes against a raging forest fire. The idea requires integrating several technologies ranging from inflatable commercial air domes to jet engine cooling to radiatively cooled spacecraft. Also included are flexible material coatings developed by NASA that radiatively reflects high temperature heat, making the deployable Fire-Shield a viable concept. Two key design principles are employed to protect both the heat shield and the home it envelopes. The first is shown in Fig-2 and uses a high speed film of air (faster than the anticipated fire-storm flame speeds of 100 – 150 MPH) that is locally directed to blow over the shield’s surface, cooling it and protecting it just like the metal turbine blades of jet-engines. The temperature of speeding flames impinging upon a jet engine’s metallic turbine blades is hot enough to easily melt them, yet the blades are protected by using this film cooling technology. The same technology will protect the heat-shield from meltdown when high speed flames of 100+ MPH attempt to impinge upon its surface. The second principle protects the shield against the intense radiant heat coming from a blazing forest fire where temperatures can exceed 2000 F. While this radiant heat does not physically touch the shield, as would a fire-storm’s flames, its presence is “felt” and is as deadly as the hot flames that would normally scrub over the shield without our film-cooling. We use a radiatively reflective, thermal coating barrier that repels this radiant heatload and protects the shield from melting. Such coatings were originally developed by NASA to protect satellites and spacecraft. The coating gets applied to the shield’s outer domed surface and will reflect better than 97% of all intensive radiant heatloads that are incident upon the dome’s surface. (Patent Pending; Original Concept Documented in 2006)  

Topic by RT-101 


From the Editor: Greetings and Salutations

Hello! Many of you already know me, so please bear with me as I introduce myself to all of those who don't. My name is Randy Sarafan and I am the Technology Editor here at Instructables. What led me to this point is not necessarily a straight trajectory, and I hope the tale I am about to tell may prove useful to someone. Contrary to popular belief, I did not wake up one morning as a child and say, "I want to be the Technology Editor at a user-submitted how-to website." In fact, as a child, I would normally tell anyone who was curious enough to inquire that I wanted to be a duck. I persisted telling people that I wanted to grow up into a duck until an alarmingly mature age. Anyhow… understanding that not everyone can grow up to be a duck, I developed a backup plan to become a 3D computer animator, and make special effects for movies. I fell in love with special effects after seeing Jurassic Park as a child. While my peers were playing sports, chasing girls, and doing recreational drugs, I spent my teenage years developing an animation portfolio. This largely translated into learning gestural figure drawing by sketching nude models with artistically inclined retirees at the local community art center. So, I got good at drawing naked people. As a teenage boy I thought this was a very useful skill to have. Unfortunately, when I finally went off to college to do 3D computer animation, I learned that 3D modeling is nothing like drawing naked people. At the dawn of this millennium, it turned out that creating a 3D animation was very unpleasant - a bit like getting a root canal. I spent many long hours in a dark, sweltering computer animation lab, literally sleeping on the keyboard. The rule was that if you left your computer for more than five minutes, anyone could stop your rendering job and lay claim to the workstation. This experience - like any professionally executed root canal - gave me a lot of time to sit still and think. I concluded that I was wasting my time creating and animating virtual worlds when there was already a perfectly good world to animate all around me - I wanted to animate real things. This sentiment may not sound very silly right now, but expressing these feelings in 2001 was pretty much crazy-talk. By that point, all of the things we now take for granted, like, smart devices, open-source technology, hackerspaces, the maker movement, online sharing, and personal fabrication were not even blips on the collective radar. In fact, I did not even begin to know where to take my desire to "animate the real world." It was only by accident that I chanced upon the Parsons Design and Technology program at a college portfolio day while attempting to transfer colleges. The admissions representative asked me what I wanted to study. I told him animation. He told me they didn't exactly have that as a major. I - in turn - asked what they did have. He responded with Design and Technology. I asked him what that was. He mumbled something about building websites and robots. "Robots?" "Yes. Robots." I was sold. When I enrolled, the Parsons Design and Technology program was in its infancy as an undergraduate major, but existed for about six years prior as a graduate major. What made my educational experience unique was that albeit I was an undergrad, I was largely taking graduate classes with some really phenomenal professors and graduate students. I cannot emphasize enough how influential and formative it was for me to work side-by-side with brilliant, and highly motivated graduate students for three years. I went into the experience with the vague goal of "animating the real world" and left with the conceptual education, technical foundation, and confidence to do it. This rightfully panicked my mother. It was now 2005, and there still was not a clear career path for someone with a degree and talent for "animating the real world." She thought I was doomed. To be honest, I too was a little fuzzy on the big "what next?" question. Albeit, I was a little less concerned. I could not articulate what I intended to do with my education, but I began to sense there were opportunities available. By this time Make Magazine had come into existence, Instructables blipped onto the radar screen, and the Eyebeam OpenLab was churning away as an idea incubator. I sensed we were on the cusp of some fundamental change, but it was still looming a little too far off on the horizon to see it clearly. Having no real path yet laid out before me, I followed my girlfriend to the west coast. I figured that perhaps a change of scenery would be nice. I ended up living in her parent's basement in the middle of the coldest and foggiest part of San Francisco. While doing a series of odd jobs, I began posting projects on Instructables primarily to keep myself sane. There is something powerful about going from a lone weirdo making things in your girlfriend's parent's basement, to be amongst a community of weirdos all making things in their basements and garages. Suddenly, what I had been doing on my own did not seem quite as strange. I may have just been some guy in a basement, but I felt like I was part of something larger. Instructables became a website that I visited religiously. One day while lurking on the site, I noticed that they were not only local, but hiring interns. I immediately applied, and almost as quickly was invited in for an interview. When I went for the interview, I was foremost surprised by the unconventional nature of the work environment (to say the least), that everyone I met knew me as "USB Apple Guy," and everyone seemed genuinely interested to meet the "USB Apple Guy." It turned out this was less of an interview than an informal screening process. Before I knew it, I was part of the Instructables team, with a vague job, and loose instructions. Over the six years that followed, I held a number of positions within the company before landing squarely upon Technology Editor. Of all of the different jobs that I have done for Instructables, I would be lying if I were to say that Technology Editor is not my favorite. I now make a living "animating the real world," sharing this knowledge with the Instructables community, and inspiring others to do the same. Even though I would have never guessed life would bring me here, I am very glad that is has. I look forward to helping this community grow and prosper.

Topic by randofo   |  last reply