Calcium Chloride Corrosive Effects

I know that calcium chloride can corrode metal, but does it require direct contact or can it generate fumes that could corrode?   Here's the issue:  I have a wood stove and I place a container of Damp Rid inside over the summer to absorb moisture.  It looks like the Damp Rid plastic container had a small crack, so moisture passed through the calcium chloride and through the container and through the back of the stove After a while I noticed a pool of water behind the stove.  I traced the problem back to the Damp Rid container, cleaned up the moisture inside and outside the stove, and replaced the Damp Rid.  At the same time I noticed areas all over the exterior of the stove where the finish was coming off, areas that were not in contact with the water.  In fact, at least one section of the stove that had direct contact shows no sign of  a problem. I'm trying to discover if the calcium chloride caused the problem, or if it's something else causing the damage.

Topic by corgaff 


How do I get rid of corrosion in electronics? Answered

In some of my old electronics I have noticed the corrosion that has caused destruction.  I make attempts to clean it out by scraping (usually with a knife).  So, do you have any good remedies to my solution, please help!

Question by Kaptain Kool   |  last reply


Solar cells and the environment

Question about solar cells. Since solar panels are encased in glass or polycarbonate, does exposure to the elements degrade solar cells? And if so, in what fashion? Corrosion of the traces? water infiltration? etc. etc? Or is it a matter of the fragility of the cells?

Topic by Tool Using Animal   |  last reply


Is there any reaction between aluminum an bronze? Answered

I would like to use some bronze bushings on an aluminum rod, but would like to know if some kind of reaction will happen (like the aluminum corroding or something bad). Thanks

Question by qwertyboy   |  last reply


Remove corrosion from camera without complete disassembly? Answered

I recently got sunscreen sprayed in my camera, and now I believe the shutter button might have developed a short, which locks the camera up. Upon disassembly, I can remove the portion of the camera with selector/zoom/shutter dials, but not further disassembly can be made without some major work. Is there a way I can remove any corrosion buildup in this part without damaging it? It is not connected to any power source, so liquids are fine, but it does contain an array of plastic and metal parts, as well as ribbon cables.

Question by astroboy907   |  last reply


Water-damaged PCB repair

So water leaked in to the General Electronic Module (GEM) on my pickup and now it's acting all funny. A/C runs when the ignition is off, randomly switching to 4L, airbag light chattering on and off, etc. I want to try and repair it. My intuition is that it just acts up when there's stray conductivity between traces/elements, so if I give it a good clean and keep it dry it should work like new.However, I noticed upon pulling it apart that there's some corrosion taking place. Can anyone suggest a good way to repair these traces/SMD resistors? I have a soldering iron but heavily oxidized things don't take solder well in my experience. Or should I just put some lacquer on it and not worry about it?Thanks!

Topic by RelaxedSoup   |  last reply


Waterproofing RC servo connections?

Hi everyone. I have used epoxy to waterproof my RC receivers. I have thought that there is no need to waterproof the connections because it is only 6V and not enough to corrode the connectors. I still want to be able to swap my receivers between models. I have splashed through puddles before but not completely submersed it in water. So is there any reason that I should be waterproofing these connectors? Or is the voltage not enough to cause any problems? Thanks, David.

Question by David97   |  last reply


Can my iphone 6 be fixed after salt water damage? Answered

Hi, Can my iphone 6 be fixed after salt water damage? It was sitting in rice for about a week while I was on holiday after salt water got through my waterproof case. After a week I can home and put it in isopropyl alcohol and then let it to dry for 24 hours. This didn't work, opened it up and there's lots of corrosion, one of the connectors has corroded and the battery has corrosion on too.  IS this past repair??

Question by mazrl13   |  last reply


how do dust affect my performance in my computer?

How can i explain this factors which affect my computer! 1.Excessive temperature 2.Human being 3.Power outrage 4.Corrosion 5.Viruses 6.noise 7.Dust building up

Question by    |  last reply


Is Calcium Chloride safe to use on roof or gutter ice dams? Answered

In cold climes, snow buildup on roofs often leads to ice dams, usually at the gutter. When the snow melts, the dam can route water under roof shingles and cause roof damage.Is Calcium Chloride safe to use on roofs? (Sodium Chloride is not, due to it's corrosiveness.)

Question by gmoon   |  last reply


laptop backlight question? Answered

Long story short.  Room mate got bleach on his Toshiba laptop.  It spilled into the port of the usb area, hdmi, network cable side and he said it instantly cut off. He tried turning it on and the power light would just flick off. (he also borrowed my movie that i rented from the library)  After drying it all day we took it apart and noticed the bleach had corroded the usb port. I remembered in my college days that shorting a usb port will cause power supply to cut off. So i said lets get some CRC QD cleaner and just clean the corrosion and it should work. I couldn't get any electric cleaner but the people who work across the street had some non chlorinated break cleaner.  We used that to clean as much of the corrosion as possible off the usb and noticed some on two of the chips on the motherboard had corrosion.  Spent about 20 min cleaning each pin on the chips to separate them and tried powering it again.  (at this point the laptop is mostly apart and just got bare essentials put together).  It worked, fans started spinning and screen flashed its toshiba windows didnt shutdown logo. I begin to assemble it as much as possible without putting any screws in. I got the keyboard in and every electrical component.  i mashed the power button and the backlight on the screen wont come on.  I can see the text on the screen change but no light. Take the keyboard out and it works normally.  Can someone help me, or got any pointers?  I'm away from home so I dont have access to fancy equipment like tooth brushes or contact cleaner.

Question by thematthatter   |  last reply


Is it safe to use the Phosphoric Acid Barrels from a large soda bottler to make a composter?

These are barrels I got when I requested Soda Syrup Barrels, directly from the bottling plant.  They still contain a small amount of liquid.  The barrels are white and have a label that says CRI-1020787, Corrosive, 8, Phosphoric Acid Solution, UN 1805, along with a bar code. There is no mention of percentage on the label.  I assume they are food grade.  I need to know if they are safe to use to make a composter.  Please let me know, what you know.

Question by jpalke   |  last reply


What equipment is needed to fill an appropriate cylinder with oxygen generated by the electrolysis of water?

Update: I need someone that has experience with gas cylinders to point out potential dangers that would be present by filling this way, We've already discussed water vapor and oil potentially making its way inside. That doesn't sound good to me so I need certainty that its safe or those can be eliminated or reduced to safe levels. Right now I would really like to know what I need so I can refill tanks myself. I'm guessing its a special adapter or replacement valve, but I don't know where to start Original: Would it be possible to fill an appropriate oxygen tank with the right adapters/compression system with the oxygen generated by electrolyzing water and what kind of equipment would be needed? I know for propane you can buy adapters and refill/transfer from one to another, but obviously this is completely different, and I don't know anything about oxygen valves/adapters or compression systems. Yes I know this could potentially be very dangerous and also have no interest in collecting the hydrogen. Just to clarify we are talking about commercial grade tanks, not a 2 liter soda bottle. Also, if possible how high of purity would be expected using optimal electrodes and electrolytes to prevent corrosion and impurities. Any information at all would be very helpful.

Question by NathanE31   |  last reply


can i make hydrogen sulfide by reacting a sulfide with oxalic acid?

Hi, i am trying to make hydrogen sulfide for the purpose of reacting it with ammonium hydroxide to create ammonium sulfide. however, since my parent think that concentrated hydrochloric acid is too dangerous to work with, especially since i can only get huge 20L bottles of it, i have decided to quest for a new acid to react with calcium polysulfide, to get hydrogen sulfide, thats when i came across solid oxalic acid. at first glimps, i saw that it said, hazardous, extremely corrosive acid, i thought "yes", this would work, i could react this with the lime sulfur , but then after some research i discoverd that no-one in the history of the world has ever documented the practical reaction of oxalic acid with a sulfide, in order to make hydrogen sulfide. so i want to ask , will oxalic acid, when mixed with calcium polysulfide, generate hydrogen sulfide? another reason though i might point out why i dont think oxalic acid will react with calcium polysulfide, is because it is a solid crystal acid, one that does not evapourate into gas like sulfuric or hydrochloric acid, and i cannot find anywhere documented either of non gaseous acids being able to react with calcium sulfide to make hydrogen sulfide, according to what i have found out, only nitric, sulfuric and hydrochloric acids will work. but this is also the reason i want to use oxalic acid over hydrochloric because i want to boil off the hydrogen sulfide through a tube and into concentrated ammonium hydroxide, but if there is hydrochloric acid in the solution, it would very likely boil off as well, which would be something of a hassle.

Question by oldmanbeefjerky   |  last reply


Help (advice) with building a Nautilus

I believe that nature in itself has the solution for all our problems . I believe that a combination of mechanical engineering and marine biology (marine comparative bio-mechanics) can provide a new scope of development . I have always been fascinated and intrigued by marine animals which have survived billions of years and great changes of the Earth . ( eg . nautilus)  [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nautilus ] . Its my understanding that this cephalopod has the most effective and energy conversant method of locomotion. It uses water jet propulsion for motion and uses the air cavities inside its shell for buoyancy  . These mechanisms of locomotion can be studied and modified for creation of low-speed , high-efficiency underwater locomotives . The Nautilus v.1 is a fusion of both biomechanics and state of the art electronics. It uses the habitual and operational features of the living fossil nautilus. The living nautilus is the sole inspiration reason for this underwater utility simply because of its magnificence. It has survived for millions of years in the open oceans which is a remarkable feat in itself but surprisingly it makes a daily trip of 150-200m from the ocean bottom to the surface nocturnally for feeding. Even though Nautilus v.1 uses many of the systems used by underwater rovs , it stands a class apart by achieving partial autonomy . The Nautilus v.1 is far superior from its rivals such as openrov, sea perch, etc. because of its low power consumption and longevity. It attains this by excluding power consuming components like propellers. Its operation is completely on the basis of neutral buoyancy attained by productions of gas bubbles by simple water electrolysis. The gas bubbles are collected in different gas chambers for operation at different water levels. The salinity of sea water facilitates water electrolysis and more gas can be produced with less currents. Graphite electrodes are used to prevent electrode corrosion. The electronics part is still under discussions for an optimum control unit. This will act as the base for addition of sensors and locomotive systems. Currently the main two platforms under work are the beaglebone black and the android versions. Both have their own advantages and disadvantages. Beaglebone would be optimum for component level additions, such as sensors can be added on, whereas in the case of an android system such as a smartphone, most of the sensors are inbuilt and their raw data can be attained. For progress till now, please visit http://opennautilus.wordpress.com/

Topic by cecilj 


Options to improve cooling and reduce consumption for portable coolers

I recently had to start learning how to service airconditioners on the fast and that learning got me thinking about my portable coolers.... Some of us like to go camping or on longer fishing trips, so there might be one of those 3-way fridges in use or a better cmpressor model. The one thing they all have in common is that they can only cool down to a difference in ambient temperatures. No matter which way we turn it the cooling produces heat and that needs to get away somehow. The other big thing is the cooling cycling - or the lack of it on a warm day. After some reading and thinking I came up with some ideas that might be applicable to your existing cooler if you are willing to mess around a bit. Let's start with the produced heat, shall we? Down here in Australia most people either have the fridge in their4WD or camper. In a car or small camper trailer there is often the problem of airflow, so the cooler might be doing overtime for no other reason than a lack of airflow. If you check online sites like Amozon and Ebay you quickly find fan systems meant to be installed inside the cooler to get lower temperatures and a quicker cooling of fresh goods. The thing is that the box is quite well insulated and the benefit of the airflow goes only as far as it can reach. And even if the box is quite empty and you would have a benefit of the cold air moving around it won't change the fact that "improved" cooling always comes with more heat in this case. But if we use one of these fan systems to actually improve the airflow on the hot side we not only get better cooling but also a reduce power consumption - something worth considering if you have no backup power generator.... This of course brings us to placement. As I have done the mistake myself you might be tempted to put a 3way cooler onto your seat. Opening it with the back free means the lid always gets stuck on the seat, do it the other way around and you block the airflow. If you do put it on the seat then make sure two things match: 1. The thing is secured properly. 2. The airflow from your aircon is able to reach the hot side of the cooler. Even permanent installations in a camper benefit from a good airflow. Often the fridge or freezer is built into some sort of bench and the airflow behind might be very limited. A simple solution here is to add a vent on top of the bench to allow the hot air to escape. A better one is to use a fan that is powered together with the heating element or compressor and drives the hot air to the outside. How to improve the cold side of the box or fridge? Well, to be honest there is not much that can be done unless you are prepared for some serious work. Depending on compartment size, contents and how full it is a little fan can help to keep the temperatures even but it won't help to get it cooler or reduce the cycling periods for the cooling. The only really working way that I found is to use a "battery" for the storage of the cold. The cooling works by checking the inside temp of the box and if above the set temp the cooling won't stop. This is all well and good while we have a constant supply of power but once we are on batteries it would be great to keep the active time to a minimum. A working solution is to build a container that fits around the cooling element. Smaller types often use an aluminium heatsink, bigger types might come with a compressor and an evaporator. In either case proper sealing is important! Most good models are fully waterproof, meaning even if you would fill them with water they would not leak in other areas than the door. But double check and if in doubt use a bit of silicone to make sure. Ok, but how do we "store" the cold coming from the device? Cold packs ;) These things contain a ready to use mix that holds cold temperatures quite well. Another really good alternative is alcohol or radiator coolant, although the last has limited capabilites in terms of holding capaity for the cold as it is desinged to exchange heat fast rather than to keep it. With a suitable sized and sealed box around the active cooling element we will need longer to actually see any cooling happen (with a warm "battery") but that can be compensated for by good planning or a frozen water bottle. If the cooling element is covered with a box of cooling gel then it has to cool this first before anything happens inside the box. But once it does the pack is already far below the normal temp it would have during normal operation. Remember the inside of the cold pack cools down first before the outside will get cold ;) So once the set temperature is reached the device will shut off. But since the cold pack is far below the set temp it will continue to cool our box until the core is warmer than the set temp. Quick thinkers will now say the benefit is lost as the time required to cool the "battery" down again is much longer than the normal cycle time - and they would be correct. But as we get much colder temps inside the gel box the overall running will still be less compared to normal operation. And since from the second cycle on the gel is only warming up to operating temp of the box it will be much faster than with a warm box. Another benefit might be the ease of cleaning and ice removal. Some peltier driven coolers have big cooling fins or a quite bad design for the heatsink allowing mould to grow where you can't remove it easy. If the box is made from stainless steel and flush with the back wall of the box we won't have that problem anymore. Ok, but how much is good or too much for the size and gel content? You got me there as it is bit tricky. You don't want to loose much usable space for starters and you don't want to wait hours for the gel to cool down if the box was not used. IMHO the size should fit the cooling element with about 20% to spare all around. If stainless steel is not an option than aluminium is the next best choice. Thin sheets can either be be cold formed with a hammer or "brazed" with a good torch and the right rods. Ok, before that route is there anything I should consider or do first? Depends ;) 3-way systems usually use a flame or heating elements to heat an ammoia solution. After years of neglect corrosion can form and reduce the amount of heat transfered into the system and reducing the efficiency this way. It might help to take the heating elements out once a year or so to clean them and the contact areas from any corrosion or dirt build up. With a fixed shedule for this you won't have the problem of never noticing a badly corroded heating element either - and this is the main failure on these systems.... Modifying your camper or making a few mods to your 4WD drawer system is not for the faint of heart and should be done with consideration. The last thing you want to do is rush things to find out it was not necessary. Before cutting holes check if you can't find the room for the fan in a different spot and use ducts to control the airflow - sometimes it is easier to blow air in than to get air out ;) When it comes to creating vents or connections for air to the outside always make sure it is waterproof and insect safe! If you can let the outlet go downwards so water won't run in, for 4WD trailers consider a flap to prevent water from going during a river crossing. Flyscreens will not only prevent insects from coming in but on the inside also prevent dust to go eerywhere - allow to the removal and cleaning! The salts used in these cold packs can be corrosive, so you have to make sure there are no leaks and that there is no steel to come into contact with gel - this includes screw ends hidden in through-holes. If in doubt use a coat of paint but keep it as thin as possible. Even on peltier systems it might be impossible to remove the heatsink without massive surgery on the internals. So before you take it all apart to gain access check if it is far easier to seal around the box opening and possible screw connections using silicone. The cooling battery can be screwed on and sealed with silicone as well as an easy escape route. Although for this to work you need to check if the material of the box allows for a proper bond with the silicone! Some materials just won't allow anything to stick at all, even after sanding them. So do a test first in an area where you would be able to cut the silicone away without causing damage. If you can rip or peel it off the surface you should not try to use a cooling battery screwed to the wall, only use a box that is fully sealed with the cooling element and has a seperate back - one complete unit around the cooling element. I have a 3-way system with a freezer compartment that does the cooling for the fridge too - what can I do? These units either provide good freezing with the fridge temps too low or good fridge cooling with no freezing capabilites - depending on the thermostat used. Our problem is that is next to impossible to add a cooling battery of the normal kind to these systems. The L-shaped freezer box can really only be added with a L-shaped cooling battery from underneath. Only if you don't need any freezing at all you could add a cooling battery to fit into the freezer box shape. In either case the benefit is somehow limited by the way the thermostat is used. If there is no temp control for freezing it should be fine. Warnings... Only peltier driven coolers are free from refrigerants. Every 3-way or compressor system uses refrigerant as evident by more or less piping and heating elements. Never attempt to screw anything into a cooling element containing refrigerant! Even if you think between the channels all will be fine it won't be! The material is just pressed to form the channels and any damage caould mean refrigerant leaking out! Use silicone instead and make sure all surfaces are properly cleaned before applying it, also wait until the silicone is really fully cured before putting any stress on it. As said, these cooling gels can be corrosive, especially if DC voltage is involved. Make sure that everything that is not aluminum or plastic is properly sealed before allowing ongoing contact with cooling gels. Do not attempt any of this if you have to ask yourself what tools you might need or how make a suitable container for the gel. If in doubt check Google on how to work with aluminium or stainless steel if there are not enough Instructables for it. The gel will expand a little bit if it freezes, this no problem in a metal container if you allow for a bit of flex or on the side added strength  - whatever suits you better. Another option is to get a few different cold packs (by the active ingredient) and to do a check in a little container. Freeze it and note whe level cold and warm. Little to no difference means nothing to worry in terms of expansion during freezing.

Topic by Downunder35m 


Soldering tips and tricks for complicated metals

Whether you are just a hobby builder or do your own electronics projects, you know how to solder...Then one day you find yourself in the position that your solder just does not want to stick...My first moment of total defeat happened when I was a teenager.Was building some simple motor with instructions from a book but substituted what I could...Ended up with some stainless steel contacts and being unable to solder my wires to them...If you ever had problems like this then read on ;)What are easy to solder metals?Basically everything that does not form an oxide layer on the surface and is able to bind with tin, lead or silver.Copper is one of the easiest metals to solder on but every plumber certainly knows how important a clean and corrosion free surface is.Any coating or alloy that prevents oxidisation or provides a harder surface usually means with normal, electornics solder we might be lost.Nickel for example can be a true pain and same for chrome.So lets start with the hard metals first.Steel, nickel, stainless...If the part size does not already mean trouble to get it hot enough, then we face the problem of how to "wet" it with our solder.Normal steel is usually fine if you give it a fine sanding right before the soldering, however getting the heat onto the part is crucial.Even something simple like a 5mm thick steel rod can be a pain with a normal soldering iron.I good way to cheat is to preheat the part or area with a blow torach on a soft flame - not a hot, blue flame.Try to do this away from the area you need to solder as the temperature difference usually causes some initial condensation on the surface.Most steels that play a vital role don't like to be overheated as it can affect the hardness an other things, so be careful here.Rosin core solder works fine on steel and it also indicates when the temperature gets too hot by boiling and smoking badly.If you still struggle to wet the surface try to scratch it with your solder - if it does not melt the surface is not hot enough.Nickel coatings are usually very thin and a slight sanding quickly reveals the layer underneath.If the metal used is not copper already then a copper layer will be electroplated on before the nickel coating.Either way the key is to get through the nickel without going through the copper, for example if steel contacts were used for durability reasons.After that soldering is as easy as directly onto copper.Steinless steel however can be a true pain, same by the way if you need to preserve the nickel coating as best as possible and can sand it off.Without using chemistry the only way I found is to use a stainless steel tip in the soldering iron.But as the preperation of one requires chemicals anyway we might start with them first.The passivating layer of layer or stainless steel can of course be pre-treated by sanding.Especially very shiny surface benefit from it.After this I prefer to wet the surface with Phosphoric Acid - you can find it in the harware store as "Rust remover".It is a food grade acid used in many of your favourite fizzy drinks, so skin contact is not a big deal - just wash it off.The phosphoric acid is not strong enough to break the oxide layer but it keeps air away.And once you start scratching the hot metal with your stainless steel soldering tip it will prevent a new oxide layer from forming.This method however requires a low temperature solder and quick work as the acid boils off quickly.In the plumbing section of your hardware store your find various fluxes for soldering.Look for something containing both Ammonium Chloride and Tink Chloride.Around here a common brand name is Bakers Fluid.Usually if it has a red danger label on it you will find the above ingredients on the lable somewhere.Be careful with it as it is very corrosive and harmful to your health!Good thing is that all remains can be washed off with just running water.What does it do though?Unlike the phosphoric acid, the chlrodies directly attack the metal.Especially once getting hot, so if in doubt wear proper protection as advised on the label!The oxide layer is not only being eaten away, there is also an ion exchange happening, so a product with more than 30% of zink chloride is prefered here.The zink binds with the stainless steel or nickel and provides an easier way to bond for the solder.Key is to work quickly and with precision!Flux paste is good for brazing but not so good for soldering.The flux liquid, unlike the paste will start to boil right when the metal get to soldering temperatures.That is if you use standard lead based solder, most lead free types should be ready a bit sooner.Start to scratch the metal with the solder and use a soft flame from the other side or close to the soldering area - do not apply the flame directly onto the flux covered area.Why? Well, the flux isolates the metal from the heat of the flame and it will boil off way before the metal gets hot enough ;)On smaller parts and when using the soldering iron create a small bubble of solder and keep scratching the surface while it heats up.In case the flux dries off apply a bit more before this happens!Once the solder starts to wet the metal a tiny bit it is usually very easy to spread it out to the desired size and shape.With the heat applied from the underside the solder will always flow to the area of most heat!Once done it is best to let the part cool down then to give it a good wash under running water to remove all remains of the flux.Failing to to do so will result in quick and ongoing corrosion, so do it properly...Aluminium, the bad metal...I encountered it first when I could not welding or brazing on a quite small part.Plus, of course, the problem of having to add a copper wire as well.Then again when I had to solder some aluminium wire.Acid won't work, chlorides only make it worse, so don't bother with either for aluminium.Standard rosin core solder also fails.But there is a suprisingly simple solution to the oxide problem on aluminium.Mechanical work...There are quite few videos out there showing how someone solders onto some aluminium foil.It is so simple because the foil is thin - use it to test your new skills.A thing though that is often done wrong is the surface preperation.It usually starts with a fine sanding - to remove the oxide layer.....The some oil is applied and soldering starts under the oil cover.And if pay attention then it is often a painful process of scratching with the soldering iron while trying to make the solder bubble wet the aluminium.That's why foil is so simple here....What happened in those videos?Quite simple: Aluminium oxidises right away while you sand it.Even if you are quick with the oil it already happened.So why not do the sanding after the oil was applied?A fibreglass pen or a stainless steel wire brush (usused on other things!) work quite well here.The oil prevents the air from attacking the aluminum.If in doubt use some clay and form a little dam around the soldering area to prevent the oil from running off.Petroleum jelly, vaseline and all other identical things work fine here same for clean engine oil.But you have to use rosin free solder, no flux core, just plain solder.If you don't have it simply melt some normal rosin core solder to a nice drop and clean the rosin off ;)Since there is no real oxide layer with this way of pre-treating the soldering and wetting happens right once the aluminium get hot enough to melt the solder.You might find it sticking nice right away but don't be fooled!You need to heat the aluminium until you actually see the solder forming a nice puddle.With careful sanding you create very clean boundaries.Other soldering tricks...Getting cholired based flux for a single job might be overkill.If you happen to have one of these tip cleaning stones for your soldering iron then you have what you need ;)Simply scrape some of it off and dissolve it is a tiny amount of water.Will only be ammonium chloride and requires more scratching on stainless steel but works...Preparing a stainless steel soldering tip sunds as easy as finding a suitable piece of wire and grindinga tip onto it.If you every changed the tip on a soldering iron them you know there is two types.The simple one for the cheaper irons uses a set screw or similar to hold the tip.The better ones are hold in place by a collar or other type of screw fitting.And well, those have a thicker part in their body.If you need to solder stainless steel more than once or twice it makes sense to buy a cheap but powerful soldering iron and to make sure it uses a straight piece of metal with no thicker parts to hold it in place.If you can't find some stainless steel wire or round bar of suitable thickness you can go slightly below or much thinner if you require a thin tip.Just make a copper or aluminium collar for the tip to hold it in place, like a sleeve to go around.Grind the tip to your desired shape before fitting it in....You won't need a mirror finnish and it can be helpful if the the surface is quite rough.After all, you want to scratch around on stainless steel with it and you can't harm it this way.To get a nice and clean cover of solder onto the tip you need the mentioned flux from above.Use a small cup and fill some of the flux in it so you can dip the tip of the soldering iron into it.If there is no temperature control start with a cold iron and the tip sanded off a last time right before dipping it into the flux.Use some clamps or whatever you feel like to help keeping the tip in place.If you get flux onto bits you don't want to cover with solder then wash off and try again.Turn the iron on observe the tip.As soon as you see tiny bubble forming take it out and quickly start rubbing your solder onto the tip.It helps to have a thick enough solder so you can apply some pressure here.And of course the solder should be nice and shiny and not covered by oxides...Special cases like titanium or othe metals that usually fail to bond with solder....Let's face it: whenever soldering is not feasable we are happy to revert back to crimping or screwing.Nothing wrong with it either and often the better option when it comes to being able to do a quick repair at a later stage.Most of thes special metals, including your favourite heating wire can still be solder using the right surface prep and flux but it really should be avoided if you can.And real bond like you get when soldering copper would only be on a surface level and mechanical strenght questionable.On a professional level ultrasonic soldering is used to make the impossible possible.The cavitation effect breaks through the surface oxides or passivating layers and the solder just wets the surface like it would be copper.On a hobby level things look different though.Unless you decide to build your own solar panels from scratch the investment into some low end ultrasonic soldering machine already set you back a few grand....There is a way to cheat on the cheap though if you are into experimenting and building things....More on that in my other topic about making an ultrasonic soldering tank. ;)

Topic by Downunder35m 


Let us assemble power distribution switches at home together.

I am an electronic engineer in the field of power distribution switches. In recent days, I am prepared to make a project for power distribution switches at home together.  The project begins now: Home decoration, the concern of hydropower indispensable. The laying of the home circuit is a crucial link, the home distribution box installation involves the safety of home appliances. Therefore, I specifically summarise the home distribution box installation knowledge, as well as home distribution box wiring diagram to make the relevant finishing, for everyone to take precautions, the home distribution box has a clear understanding. Home distribution switch installation points 1, Household distribution switch sub-metal shell and plastic shell two, there are two kinds of mounted and concealed, the box must be intact. 2, The household distribution switch of the cabinet wiring assembly should be set up to zero line, to protect the ground wire, phase line, and to be intact, with good insulation. 3, The installation of air switch seat should be clean and there is enough space, should be installed in the dry, ventilated parts, and no obstruction, easy to use. Never install the distribution box in the box to prevent fire. 4, The household distribution switch should not be installed too high, the general installation of the elevation of 1.8 meters, in order to operate; into the distribution switch of the electric tube must be fixed with a lock nut. 5, If the household distribution switch to be open, the edge of the hole to be smooth, smooth, distribution box buried in the wall should be vertical, horizontal, edge left 5 to 6 mm gap, distribution box wiring Should be rules, neat, the terminal screws must be tightened. 6, The loop into the line must be sufficient length, no joints, after installation marked the name of the use of the circuit, the installation of household distribution box to be completed after the removal of the distribution box residue. How to assemble power distribution switches at home ? 1, The installation of electrical box, distribution box installed on the wall, should be used bolts (expansion bolts) fixed, bolt length is generally buried depth (75 ~ 150mm), the thickness of the box floor, nuts and washers Of the sum of the thickness, plus about 5mm of the "margin". For smaller distribution boxes, it is also possible to embed a good brick at the installation site (in the form of a distribution box or a panel mounting hole) and then use wood screws to secure the distribution box or power distribution board. 2, Dark assembly distribution box, distribution box embedded in the wall installation, in the wall when the hole should be reserved than the length and width of the distribution box about 20mm, the depth of the distribution of the thickness of the distribution box with the wall Plaster thickness. In the masonry distribution box, the box and the wall filled with concrete can be fixed to the box live 3, The distribution box should be installed firmly, horizontal and vertical, vertical deviation should not be greater than 3mm; concealed, the distribution box should be around the gap, the edge of the panel should be close to the wall, the box and the building, Part should be coated with anti-corrosion paint. 4, The distribution box installed in the spiral fuse, the power cord should be connected to the middle of the terminal contact, the load line should be connected to the threaded terminal. In this way, in the loading and unloading fuse will not be electric shock. Porcelain plug-in fuses should be mounted vertically. 5, The distribution box of AC, DC or different voltage levels of power, should have a clear sign. Lighting line, should be set to zero line (N line) and protect the zero line (PE line) bus, zero line and protection of the zero line should be connected to the bus, not twisted, should be numbered. 6, The wire leads to the panel, the panel line hole should be smooth without burrs, metal panels should be installed insulation protective cover. Metal shell distribution box shell must be reliable grounding (then zero). Ps: Excuse me if I was wrong in words or expressions as I am a green hand in the field of power distribution switches. I need continual learnings. What is your idea ? Do you agree with my ideas ? Any of your ideas would be highly appreciated. May someone would like to help ? thanks in advance.

Topic by maryzhu   |  last reply