Dissolving Epoxy Answered

I have a project where I have an antique electronic part that is sealed with epoxy. Is there any way of dissolving the epoxy in order to view the original parts? This is so I can construct a replacement part.?

Question by Foxtrot70   |  last reply


I have an aluminum channel I need to stiffen. I'd like to do this with epoxy/flox, foam and fiberglass.

The channel is long enough to twistAfter slathering the mixture around the foam in the channel Do I wait for the epoxy/flox mixture to dry before applying the fiberglass strips? Will the epoxy bond to the aluminum without specific surface prep? Thanks in advance

Question by donswords   |  last reply


nokia 800 - front screen significantly cracked - in full working order - can I use epoxy to mend screen ?

My son's friend 'dropped' his phone. Being quoted upwards of £50 to fix. My husband is wondering whether an epoxy could be used to fill in the cracks - as all is working. It's just the shards on front of screen are at present dangerous - I can testify to that as we took off the cling film we had initially covered it in at the repair shop - put it back in my handbag - and I then ended up with small slivers of glass embedded in my thumb. Nice. It's just such a shame. Was an old contract phone, given as a present to my son - and everything works !! Epoxy seems so easy - but will it ruin the phone?

Question by nufab4   |  last reply


Covering a stickered laptop with epoxy resin? Answered

Hi! I recently got a new laptop and I covered the top cover with stickers and it looks pretty good if I do say so myself. I didn't want the stickers to peel up or anything so I went on over to the hardware store and bought some Krylon Crystal Clear spray, which is an acrylic lacquer based spray. I sprayed a whole 32 coats on that sucker and it was still paper thin. It's as if I simply made the surface shiny, and the stickers could still easily peel up. So I did a lot of research and I found a lot of things but I figured a 2 part pour on epoxy resin was the best choice. It's thick, self leveling, self doming, and it cures instead of air drying. My goals from the beginning were to eliminate surface texture altogether. I want the end product to be like those table top bars with stuff encased inside within a clear glass-like coating. I have found a lot of stuff, but I have yet to find anyone that has done what I am trying to do, and since it's my new laptop, I have concerns. How durable will the epoxy be? I want to make sure that it will be able to withstand the life of a college student, although I'm a quite careful one at that. Will the epoxy have any trouble bonding and staying bonded to the Krylon spray? It's an acrylic lacquer based coating according to the company. I don't want the shell of epoxy separating from the top of the laptop. I'm worried about bumping the edges and having the epoxy chip off or just separate altogether. That last question is the main and most important one, really. The last thing I want happening is for the epoxy to dry and then separate from the laptop or crack or chip or something. The epoxy I've settled on for now is Envirotex Lite, I'm not sure how much epoxy differs between manufacturers. I've emailed several companies asking lots of questions and I've gotten a lot answered, but these ones have yet to be solved. Thank you so much for reading this and any input or advice would be greatly appreciated!

Question by jcbeaver7   |  last reply


Instant setting epoxy, resin, or plastic?

Does anyone know of something that is cheapish and suitable for 3D printing by being extruded from a thin tube, and cures immediately on contact with a dried bit of itself, or exposure to another chemical or something?  It must be practical to put though a tube at low pressure, and again, cure almost instantly once it comes out of the tube.  Traditional 3D extruders will NOT work, as the device needs to be able to distribute to hundreds of tiny tubes at once (I cant cut a plastic filament into 300 pieces lengthwise, if you can, good job!), plus that I would have only about 1/4"-1/8" x 1/4"-1/8" x 6" to fit the device into. 

Question by jduffy54   |  last reply


Liquid glass or solid water is the look I am trying to achieve.

Does anyone know of a solution that becomes a clear solid other than an expensive epoxy? I am filling 48" vases with broken glass holding tree branches for an event. I need to permanently anchor these. I have been using an epoxy made for this application however, because of the size the cost is becoming prohibitive. Parafin is not strong enough. The sodium silicate from the "cash for clunkers" program is not clear. Ice is not practical. Even something I could melt and reset may work.

Question by abbicorwin   |  last reply


How hard is epoxy wood filler? Answered

I've asked quite a few questions regarding prop building, as to try and get back to my project. Major issue is the VOC of body filler and fiberglass resin. However, I think I found a soultion to it. I was curious as to how hard epoxy wood filler is once cured. Is it something that (god forbid) if coated onto something, and said something is dropped, will the epoxy be damaged? How hard is it work with (ie, can I heat it up to make it 'thinner')? Thanks in advance! 

Question by DoctorWoo   |  last reply


silicone glue for potting my high power led system?

I'm working on a portable high power LED system and I'm thinking of potting it in silicone for durability. It is gonna get banged around a lot...  I need a little guidance. I've searched the internet and I can't figure out what silicone to buy? I'm looking for something as cheap as possible, but it needs to dry clear and feel somewhat like rubber when it is dry. Can someone help me find a CHEAP product online that will allow for this? Or maybe I should use epoxy? (would that come out really hard and plastic-like when it dries?) Also can someone point out the pros and cons of using this method? Will the epoxy increase the chances of the circuit overheating? Should I embed heat syncs against the mosfets and leds or what? An example of this occurring is in this instructable: https://www.instructables.com/id/Power-LED-s---simplest-light-with-constant-current/step9/permanant-ize-it/

Question by SpiffyChee   |  last reply


Anyone know a good source for scrap acrylic? Answered

 Im trying to find some acrylic but dont want to spend the ungodly amount of money that new acrylic costs.  Sometimes I find some good pieces at goodwill but that's about it.  Any ideas?

Question by sensoryhouse   |  last reply


Laser diode cooling, would sanding help?

If I sanded the sides of my laser diode (essentially the same package as a stubby 5mm led), would it increase the surface area enough so that the cooling effects are noticeable if used in conjunction with thermal epoxy and a small active cooling system? Datasheet: http://docs-europe.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/08d5/0900766b808d55b2.pdfUPDATE: Ok, due to many unforeseen minor issues/problems that have arisen, I have decided to consider a flat diode package. Although the power and pulse width are somewhat smaller, It wont really hinder the end product (which will have loads of documentation on the build here).New diode datasheet: http://catalog.osram-os.com/catalogue/catalogue.do;jsessionid=A8BC7E9CCE6FB1AA392B37F3F982A978?act=downloadFile&favOid;=0200000200001347000300b6

Question by The Ideanator   |  last reply



how can i remove epoxied/glued on metal mesh from plastic speaker grilles?

How can i remove the little disk of metal mesh from the center of my plastic speaker grilles without splitting or badly damaging the plastic? I have component speakers for my project as thats all i could source, but for lack of space i want to effectively convert them back to coaxial by removing the mesh disk and mounting the tweeters in the resulting hole. EDIT: finally got to a computer where i could add images. In the meantime i decided the best way to solve my dilemma was attacking it with a dremel (clearly the safest option... ¬¬), against all odds this has appeared to have worked though...

Question by ambientvoid   |  last reply



How much resin/epoxy would be adequate in wrapping a wood frame in fiberglass?

Im using 3yd of 50" wide 10oz fiberglass fabric and some 2" wide glass tape. I've never done any fiberglass work before, and I have no idea how to do it. The resins are expensive and I don't want to buy more or less then I need.-how much resin/epoxy with or without vacuum bagging-where would the most cost effective place be to buy it from All Suggestions Welcome!Update: the part that is going to be fibergalssed is a bike frame made of 2x4sif you dont really know, could you point me it the general direction of the answer?\I have a very limited budget by the way

Question by The Ideanator   |  last reply


How To Repair A Car Radiator Leak In The Plastic Area? ? ? ? ?

I have a radiator leak that I want to repair instead of replacing the whole radiator. I tried a couple of 2 parts epoxy glues and it won't hold for long. I think the heat just makes it weak. They are small leaks(2) on top of the plastic area. I was thinking maybe trying some fiberglass resin and cloth since I have some leftover from my fibeglass speaker box I've done a while back but not sure if I should go that way. Anyone knows of another way? Anyone had this problem and got a fix? or if there's a website where I can get the top piece to replace it myself please post a link. It's a 2000 dodge neon. Thanks.

Question by PitStoP   |  last reply


How do you separate the CRT glass safely?

Would like to separate the two pieces of glass that make up screen. Does anyone know how to do this? Can you remove epoxy that is holding them together.

Question by    |  last reply


steel cable as a transformer core? Answered

Could i use thick steel cable as a transformer core (1 inch stranded cable) if i saturated it in a nonconductive (epoxy? rubber cement? ect..?   material to eliminate eddy currents and molded it into a double C core?

Question by pwnag3   |  last reply


Circuits and Circuitboards

I would like to make circuits using paper and a conductive ink pen, but there's not way to "attach" the components to the paper. I'm looking for a conductive glue, like epoxy or super-glue, I can apply directly to the point of contact between the paper and the component. Can anyone suggest a product, or how to make such an item? Thanks, Kevin

Topic by kevin.t.stein.3 


What glue can I use to stick silicone to plastic? Answered

Plastic is easy, lots of stuff sticks to plastic, but the only thing that seems to stick to silicone is more silicone. Hot glue, super glue, Elmer's glue, Gorilla glue, and liquid steel epoxy all fail. Any suggestions? Maybe something marine related? (Background: I used some left over silicone molding compound to make a comfy handle, but it doesn't want to stay on.)

Question by Grathio   |  last reply


Waterproofing RC servo connections?

Hi everyone. I have used epoxy to waterproof my RC receivers. I have thought that there is no need to waterproof the connections because it is only 6V and not enough to corrode the connectors. I still want to be able to swap my receivers between models. I have splashed through puddles before but not completely submersed it in water. So is there any reason that I should be waterproofing these connectors? Or is the voltage not enough to cause any problems? Thanks, David.

Question by David97   |  last reply


How UV resistant is wood? Answered

I'm making a USB solar charger intended to last 20 years. It will have no batteries inside, just a voltage reg and a zener diode. The solar cells will be wired together under glass, not epoxy (for better lifespan). I want the frame to be made of wood, but how long will that last in direct sunlight? This solar charger will contain no plastics, polymers, or resins...so my only choice for a frame is glass and wood. THANK YOU SO MUCH!! -Nepheron PS. I chose wood because it is very opaque, and I reasoned that it may be fairly UV resistant... But IDK.

Question by nepheron   |  last reply


Hypnotizing 5 Axis CNC high speed car prototyping

Well, i just spent 5 minutes of my life watching a 5 axis CNC machine milling a prototype car out of some foam.I recommend you do the same.Right now.The Machine starts off with a massive block made from some rough shapes of foam. It then proceeds to rough it off into layers, it then adds a more defined smooth layer.To top it off, it then coats the entire thing in a epoxy layer.The entire process is both entertaining, and hypnotic.Via Makezine

Topic by gmjhowe   |  last reply


Finding an appropriate heatsink for 5V 3W LED? Answered

Hello, I have bought some 3W 5V leds, and now I have to dissipate the heat they produce. I am thinking of using an xbox 360 GPU heatsink i have laying around ( https://s3.amazonaws.com/assets.overclock.net/7/7b/7bb1229a_vbattach111891.jpeg ), cut in apprpriate size. Then I would glue the led with thermal epoxy to it.  Can somebody suggest an adequate size for the heatsink? I can't find any info around. I have other heatsinks as well, I would rather not buying a LED heatsink if that's not mandatory. Thanks in advance :) Picture of the leds attached, they have no board to screw them with.

Question by en_rov   |  last reply


GREAT ELECTRONIC AUDIO ITEM JUST CAME AVAILABLE

The Electronic Goldmine  has a rare to find component. "Tiny audio optocoupler is about the size of a pencil eraser and has 4 leads. These are used extensively in audio compressors, audio level controls, audio limiters, expanders/noise gates, guitar tremolo effects, guitar amplifiers and music effect boxes. Inside the black epoxy case is a 2 lead photocell (not a photodiode or photo-transistor) and a 2 lead LED. This is why the device finds extensive use in audio applications (photocell instead of photodiode). The LED requires about 10-16mA current and the resistance of the photocell varies from 150K up to megohms when the LED is off to under 400ohms when the LED is on." A

Topic by iceng   |  last reply


what are the spec. vacuum requirements for thermos bottles? Answered

I want to do some experimenting with making thermos bottles. I know that a vacuum is needed but how much? I heard that the thermal retention value only works below a certain vacuum level but I don't know what it is. any small vacuum won't do. I also would like the answer in regular terms. I found out that solar tubes use P<5x10-2Pa of vacuum. I don't know what that means in inches of vacuum. I need to know more, so that I can buy the right vacuum pump. What other equipment will I need? will a regular check valve and epoxy work for testing?

Question by M F   |  last reply


Where to get a cheap extruder? Answered

Where is the cheapest place to get an extruder for a 3D printer?  It must be premade (preferably a DC motor, not a stepper), and cannot require that I buy separate 3D printed parts.  Unfortunately, I cannot use Ebay, however, I can use most other online retailers.  It must be below $50, and if thats not possible, is there any way to make one with commonly avaliable parts (no 3D printed ones or milled parts), also cheap?  It does have to be fairly small, but need not use the premade spools of plastic, if an epoxy or solething else exists that would also work. (and I have already seen the glue gun extruder instructable here, that is far too big and heavy)  I know that most of this is a long shot, but I'm hoping someone knows/has heard of one of these.

Question by jduffy54   |  last reply


AC 30v 50/60Hz Synchronous Motor from 110

So I bought some Mirrowave turn table motors to use as an Epoxy Rod dryer I knew I didnt want the 220's and thought I had bought 110 AC  but they are  AC 30V    3W   I have 4 of them and need to know a cheap way to wire em up.  Was being cheap and didnt want to pay $10 a motor and got all 4 for $10 but now I see I am going to need a voltage reduction and or transformer.  Was thinking one of my old printer or laptop cubes would work.. but those are all AC/DC converters :-( I am pretty good with hands.. but Electrical circuits not my strong suit. 

Question by ToddG39   |  last reply


Generator from scooter motor

This project came about because someone cut the power line going to my house. The power company was slow to fix it, so I cobbled together a way to charge auto batteries for my invertor. The generator is the motor from a discarded electric scooter ( model MY1016 from JX Motor Co., rated 24v input and 2750 rpm). I removed the motor, it’s drive chain, and sprocket wheel and attached it to the frame of a discarded bike. The pictures show the details. By cranking furiously, I can charge a 12v battery with about 3/4 amp of current. There is a small epoxy rectifier to block the battery from driving the motor. This thing was made from parts on hand and cost me only the assembly time. I don’t have any sources or price lists.

Topic by ShutterBugger   |  last reply


How to repair a small metal joint? Polaroid SLR 680 camera.

I recently bought a £200 polaroid camera off e-bay for only £20. It was sold cheap due to a break on a hinge. I knew it was something I could fix, or that the camera might work with anyway. I am asking if anyone has any better suggestions for fixing this joint? So far my best plan is to cut out a small metal bridge, and attach it using epoxy resin. I have attached 3 pictures, an overall shot, a close up, and a comparison shot to the other side which is in one piece. They are all high res, so you can click on the images and view them larger for more detail.

Question by gmjhowe   |  last reply


Homebrew heaters using resistors?

Hello, First time poster! :) I've been reading up on some projects on this site centered around small homebrew heaters. One I came across I want to adapt is using two resistors and usb port power to make a small coffee mug heater. I'm kind of a novice at electronics, but I'd like to know how to design such a heater with safety and functionality in mind. I also want to control this heater via arduino if I can get a prototype together. Some questions I have: Where to get and what kind of resistors for heaters? How do I figure out what resistors to use based on power. e.g. 12v or USB power? What's a good thing to "encase" the resistors with that will withstand heat? I have thought about using radiator repair epoxy. Thanks for any help!

Topic by Sylvester2009   |  last reply


How do i plug a leak on the bottom of my 5,000 gallon well water tank? Help!? Answered

I can patch the side leaks on me metal tank easy enough with marine epoxy. but there's no way i can crawl in the tank without destroying the bottom with my weight. i would like to find something i can pour in there that would sink and find the hole and cover it up. wouldn't take much with the water pressing against it. maybe some sort of saw dust? it would eventually sink and find the leak? but it can't rot over time or have bad chemicals in it...  or something made of much smaller particles? really needs to be a remedy tested by time, maybe something from our grandfather's day. or, i could make a remote controlled robot with manipulators and a camera! nahhhhhh..... thanks

Question by abraxas1   |  last reply


Has anyone used Rustguy or zero-rust converter products?

I am looking for a fast and easy product for my volunteers to use on a steam engine that is being restored and wondered if these products are any good and worth the $$$ they charge? These products seem to be an improvement over the gloping on of the Naval Jelly and hundreds of man hours of wire brushing and sanding, priming and painting... Just wanted to know from an outside source if these are good and effective so I can recommend them to the Board of Directors and not end up looking like a jerk... They already think I don't know much because I'm younger and a girl! For example, I am still trying to convince them that the engines on static display would look nicer for longer if they used an epoxy based paint instead of exterior house paint! I appreciate any thoughts you have on the two products listed, if you know anything about them! Thanks!

Question by ALMOSTATILLSON   |  last reply


Enforcing polarity with an AC adapter?

Several months ago, I posted an I'ble for adding an AC adapter to something. The adapter I chose, from Radio Shack, is actually a two-piece "kit" -- the wall wart cord ends in a generic two-pin female jack, and they sell a bunch of different end plugs. The jack is symmetric, so that the end plug can be put on with either ground or hot on the outside.I've just realized that this could be a problem. If the electronic device expects red to be positive and black negative, then putting the jack on backwards would be equivalent to installing all the batteries the wrong-way about. Not a great feature.To "protect" the device, I'm considering adding a diode bridge to ensure that the internal "red wire" always carries the positive, and the "black wire" is always ground. Do more experienced folks consider this a good idea? Is it necessary? Would it be better, perhaps, to just epoxy the end plug so it can't be reversed?

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


Acrylic Resin / Polycarbonate Resin: Where can i buy?

I'm trying to find a place where i can buy Acrylic or Polycarbonate Resin to Cast. I'm trying to desgin and build ny own tables, desk, shelfs, and other small projects. 1) Where can i buy the Resin note: i did my research, Tap Plastics and other companys only ofer epoxy or polyester resins for casting 2) i decided acrylic and polycarbonate over other plastics. i would like your opinons 3) What are different types of acrylic and what do i need to watch out for, Im taking a Materials Manufacturing and Processes Class ant my college. Im learning about the chemistry of plastics and find it interesting Im trying to cast on a home level but trying to expand into a small business so comerical and home production tips would be nice But first thing first. I need "Real" Acrylic or Polycarbonate Resin.  Great Quality, it needs to be strong Casting Acrylic/Polyester Resin

Question by jschirm24   |  last reply


Space Heater Repair, is there a glue for broken heating element coil spacer that is inflammable? Answered

Usually a space heater consists of a fan mounted to a motor which is then mounted to a back plate. Connected to the back plate are reflective spacers that hold the heating element coils seperate from eachother so they don't spark. Recently, I figured I'd repair my space heater after it started sparking instead of going and buying a new one. I opened it up to find the spacer plate which has several arms for holding 1-5 coiled wires. One of the arms was broken and the coils touched which is why it was sparking. Seeing as this is a heater, i'm fairly certain I can't use a super glue or epoxy to fix the plate due to its flammable nature. The plates are not easily replaceable themselves as they've been spot welded into place. So the question, is there a type of glue which will hold up under high temperatures which is not flammable that will bond metal / plastic / ceramic. I'd estimate the heating element probably reaches no higher then 700 degrees. If you have any suggestions on how I would go about repairing this I'd love to hear your ideas. Thanks in advance.

Question by Lorek   |  last reply


Human finger model movements DC activated.

Hello good folk I have been working on some artificial finger extensions and retraction via a DC motor. An H-bridge is used which is connected to a dial switch. The tendons are braided fishing line. It has proven worthy during the prototype stage. The advantage of my design is that a single DC motor of servo can control movement and grasping of the entire finger. This design particularly excels when compared to the most advanced models at the moment.... The Shadow hand would be an example. Extremley capable yet the muscle collection to the rear of the hand makes their model obsoliete even before it was created. Much work needs to be done on their model to make it effective. I apologise for the pics (camera phone) as the detail leaves much to be desired. This is just a functional model of the unit, so it's not ment to look pretty. It only purpose is to serve as the concept base as I was trying to get the tendons/joint configuration worked out... You should notice the holes in each section, the tendon passes within the finger segments within a sheath embedded inside the epoxy segment. The tendon is only exposed at the joints which also need to be finished with a exterior protectant layer. I am posting these as an example of the funtioning finger. However I would like to post videos at a later date.

Topic by Lftndbt   |  last reply


Hack your Servo V1.00: Make a powerful linear actuator using a standard hobby Servo

Hack your Servo V1.00: Make a powerful linear actuator using a standard hobby Servo   Provided you have the tools and the servo you can built this for under a couple of bucks. The actuator extends with a rate of about 50mm/min. It is rather slow but very powerful. Watch my video at the end of the post where the small actuator lifts 10kg vertically.   Materials List Tools list   - hobby servo - standard hobby brass tubing             -OD: 4.0mm, ID: 3.4mm             -OD: 5.8mm, ID: 4.5mm - standard hobby styrene tubing                                                 -OD: 4.8mm, ID: 3.5mm - M4 studding - 2 x M5 washers - 2 x M4 nuts - 5 minute epoxy - cyanoacrylate - grease - multi-strand cables - heat-shrink tubing   - standard tools – screwdrivers, scalpel, files etc. - dremmel multi-tool with ceramic abrasive disk, or similar - hand-drill + 4.9mm + 2.5mm drill-bits - M3 tap - M4 tap - soldering iron - glue gun - small vice - small saw - sanding paper (relatively fine) - small flame torch         http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/material_tools.jpg Procedure - I will be giving instructions based on the dimensional parameters of the Hitec HS-300. The procedure remains the same for any type servo. I strongly recommend you read the whole post before you start. So lets make a start, shall we?   - Open your hobby servo, remove control electronics, feedback potentiometer and mechanical stop on the servo’s output gear.   - Solder new cables on the servo motor’s leads.   - Drill two 4.9mm holes on the servo case bottom cover. These should be located longitudinally along the centre line and 9.5 mm from each end (this applies on the Hitec HS-300 and is also true for many standard servos but depending on your servo type there might be differences). The M4 thread will come out from the servo body using one of these two so this hole must be located directly below the centre of rotation of the servo’s output gear. Be very careful since this alignment is very important! If you don’t get it right you might have to use a new servo! The more accurate you are, the longer your servo will endure.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/bottomCover_potHead.jpg -  Measure the dimensions of the rotating shaft of the potentiometer on the servo’s original electronics – note the geometry in general. The shaft should be flattened right at the tip in order to prevent it from freely-rotating once inserted into the servo’s output gear.   - Take the M4 studding (M4 thread) pick one end and by using the dremmel and the abrasive wheel tool, replicate the tip of the servo’s potentiometer on that end. Start by decreasing the diameter of the thread, rotating it steadily by hand against the abrasive disk (normally to 3.5mm in diameter and at least 6mm in length). Try to think of your fingers as the chuck of a slow-turning lathe. Once the diameter of the thread is down to the pot’s shaft diameter, flatten the tip according to the potentiometer’s tip. The idea is that the thread must be inserted in the servo’s output gear in the same way the potentiometer did before. The better the fit the longer your servo will endure.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/thread_modofication.jpg - On the flat tip of the M4 thread, screw the two M4 nuts approximately 20mm down its length. Following that, insert the two M5 washers. - Insert the thread inside the servo and adjust the distance of the nuts and washers down the thread such that the servo case bottom cover closes properly and the motor rotates efficiently. Basically, you have to make sure that once the thread and the servo are assembled there is no pressure between the servo case bottom cover and the nut-washer assembly. Similarly, you have to make sure that once the thread and the servo are assembled there is no gap between the servo case bottom cover and the nut-washer assembly. Once again, the better the fit the more your linear actuator will endure.   - Once you find the optimum position carefully disassemble the servo, remove the washers from the thread and use a drop of cyanoacrylate on the side of the nut that was in contact with the washers in the assembly. Let the glue to settle for 5 minutes. Unscrew the second nut by 10mm towards the flat end of the thread, and prepare a small epoxy mix.   - Put the mix between the two nuts and screw the second nut back in place. Once in place also use some epoxy on the back of the second nut as well. Ideally you should sand all contacting areas before you apply the epoxy glue. Leave to settle for at least 6 hours (even if you use a 5 min epoxy).     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/copper_thread.jpg - Secure tightly the 4mm diameter brass tube onto a vice by flattening the mounting end and use the M4 tap VERY carefully tapping as deep as possible (at least 15mm). Using the dremmel cut 10mm out of the threaded part of the tube and then verify that the created thread runs along the whole length of the small threaded tube by screwing it onto an M4 screw. Keep the 4mm threaded tube on the screw for handling purposes. Apply a layer of solder on the outside surface.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/thread_solder.jpg - Take the 5.8mm diameter brass tube pick one end and try to sand at least 5mm into the tube (on the inside). Mount the brass tubing on the vice without squishing it and apply a thin layer of solder on the inside.   - Ignite the flame torch, take the 4mm threaded tube (holding it by the screw) and move it on the soldered end of the 5.8mm diameter brass tube which should still be mounted on the vice. Using the flame torch heat-up both tubes and carefully insert the 4mm threaded tubing inside the 5.8mm tubing until is fully inside. Use a pair of pliers and insert the brass tube by holding the end of the screw that sticks out. Hold the threaded tube levelled inside the 5.8mm tube until the solder settles. If you do not have a flame torch use a candle, your soldering iron and your patience :). Remove the screw. The end result will be the cylinder of your linear actuator.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/thread_cylinder.jpg - The cylinder length should be equal to: the actuator’s desired working length (stroke) + length of the 4mm threaded tube which is inside the 5.8mm tube + 10mm for the mounting hinge at the cylinder end.   - The thread length should be: the actuator’s desired working length (stroke) + length of threaded tube which is inside the 5.8mm tube + length of the thread which resides inside the servo casing, which is model-dependant.   - Take the non-threaded/non-soldered side of the cylinder and drill a 2.5mm hole through, 5mm from the tip.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/cylinder_heatShrink.jpg - Cover the entire length of the cylinder with heat-shrinking tube and cut-off any excess bits. The 2.5mm through holes made earlier on the non-threaded side of the cylinder are now covered. Use the drill again to expose them and tap them through, using the M3 tap. Screw a 20mm long M3 studding or simply cut-off the head of a 20mm long M3 screw. This will act as your cylinder mounting hinge.   - Take the 4.8mm styrene tubing and M4 tap it 10mm deep. Cut a small ring 5mm in length and screw it in the M4 thread fully, from the side of the nut that was in contact with the washers (long side of the M4 thread). This will act as bushing between the thread and the servo’s case bottom cover. Ideally you should use nylon, copper or metal bushing.     http://www.01mech.com/sites/default/files/images/thread_servo.jpg - Secure the motor cables inside the servo casing using a glue-gun and use heat-shrinking tube to cover them. Assemble the servo including the thread, the styrene bushing and the washers.   - Screw-on the cylinder and you are good to go! Here is a video of the small actuator lifting 10kg For those of you that have watched my video on the MTR Rover     will understand where the idea of hacking the servo came from ;))   Soon we will be posting assembly instructions, code and schematics on how to modify a standard servo to get full PID speed and position control with 10-bit resolution over 360 degrees – continuous ;)     I look forward for your comments!    

Topic by Antonb   |  last reply


Polarity switching issue, first one to resolve gets a one year pro membership, if answered by June 03 2012? Answered

Ok, here's the issue.  years ago i picked up a wireless remote control kit for automotive use.  It consists of a 12v receiver with 4 sets of colour matched wires.  Basically you can turn on and off 4 devices.  Press button 1 on the remote and a on-board 15A relay activates completing the circuit for one set of wires.  Press button 1 again and the same relay cut outs and the circuit is broken.   These wires are designed to interrupt the negative or ground  side of your accessory with the positive lead hooked up to your power source.  The receivers power is hooked up to the 12v battery.  I even went so far as to open up the receiver and discovered the entire circuit to be potted in opaque epoxy (how rude) so no modding of the circuit sadly... What I can't get my head around is how to utilize this as a polarity reversing unit, or can it.  Now I have messed around with using polarity reversing circuits in a analog style before, I even wrote an instructable on making one with a DIY DPDT switch  Here's the thing, I live in a remote area of the world and do not have immediate access to what most people are used to, so is this circuit possible to be utilized in the manner I am wanting?  I have access to additional standard 4 pin relays if this helps, but not much of anything else. First person that provides a detailed anwser, which results in this working the way how I want, utilizing what I have, by the end of JUNE 3 2012 will receive a 1 year pro instructables membership.  With a possible 3 month pro membership to the one who proves most useful in finding a feasible work around by JUNE 5th 2012.  And sadly using alternate supplies is not an option, "pretend I am on the moon, with no transport available in time". see the pics Note: in the diagram, the green wires are one switch, the blue wires are another.  Their are 2 more sets of wires but these are being used to control other items and are not shown.

Question by iminthebathroom   |  last reply


Outdoor RGB LED Strip Failure

Hi all,  I've had quite a modest installation of RGB LED tape (45 meters ish, split into more manageable circuits) around the perimeter of my decking. This uses the commonly available 5050 RGB LED Strip light, the type with the epoxy covering the tape and also an outer sheath to protect it from water ingress.  I had heat shrinked the ends and also applied multiple layers of liquid electrical tape where a connection to a 4-core cable was needed. This has held up well for some time.  After about 2 years, I noticed that some of my RGB LED tape runs were sort of 'corrupting' where a small amount of moisture had got in, and shorted the RGB channels so that no matter what I feed into the tape, it always output white (or some other combinations or colours). Still, I ignored this, as it didn;t bother me too much.  These ran back to a central controller, which did the DMX control and amplification of the 12v single.  Anyway, to cut a long story short: Yesterday I smelt smoke.  I was walking around the garden and I noticed that one of the strips had caught fire, at a single point in the middle, and was burning a hole through my decking!  Again, long story cut short, I put this fire out and looked closer. The strip was so badly burnt that I can't determine what went wrong here.  I'm thinking maybe a resistor burnt out and caught fire? The tape has been running 'on' for quite some time (weeks) so this is a possibility.  Another possibility is that there could have been a short between 12v and ground, which caused heat. Now, there aren't any fuses on the 12v rail (fuse and circuit breaker protecting the 240v side) but I wouldn't have thought that this would protect me from a fire anyway!  I'm interested whether anyone else has had a similar experience or has any suggestions as to why this has happened.  I love these RGB LED strips, use them a lot in my house, but after seeing this, I'm not a little more dubious to keep using them.  I'm an electrical engineer (in the making, at University) and this has stumped me!  Thanks Joe

Topic by joearkay   |  last reply


GoPro Scuba Cylinder Mount

Hi there, I'm new here. I've recently found an entry-level 3D online modelling software, Tinkercad and have been Tinkering ever since. I'm into scuba diving and I've long wanted to design a GoPro mount for the cylinder to give a 3rd person view of me while I'm swimming about enjoying life underwater. (Think a less-sexy Lara Croft!) I wanted to run it past you guys to see what you think. I've attached 2 screenshots, because as you can see, the mount I've designed is collapsible, to save space in my GoPro bag. I've done the maths (Pythag) so each side is perfectly lengthed to create a right-angled triangle, with the hypotaneuse (long edge) is facing down my body, towards my feet, so that the camera view won't be obstructed. I've used a Pythag triple, so the arms measure 3", 4", 5". This was done for 2 reasons: a) It was easier to desine using these measurements and b) I don't want it sticking too far up from my cylinder so that it doesn't catch on wildlife/coral/divers. As this is my first GoPro mount that I've designed, I've had to go on deimensions I've found online for the actual hinges. I've settled on approx 3mm for each prong as well as the gap in between. I have actually shaved off .25mm from the middle prong of the 3-pronged-hinge, and left the 2-pronged-hinge at 3mm for the gap and prongs. I'm going to get the pieces 3D-printed by a local service I've found on 3DHubs.com, either in ABS plastic or in resin, though I'll probably go for ABS as it seems to be a bit more hard-wearing, even if it's not so detailed. In terms of mounting it to the tank, I will use 2 headstraps, with the over-the-top strap removed from each one and glue the plastic bits of each of them together, at the correct length of course. I would join them using a seperate piece of plastic and either a hot glue gun, superglue or even some sort of epoxy, whatever lasts longest in prolonged exposure to seawater. I would probably place it nearer the top of the tank, near to where the strap of the BCD jacket goes round it. Does anybody have any advice for me in terms of the design from a functional point of view as well as from whether they think it would actually get a good shot on the camera please? I look forward to your feedback, good or bad!

Topic by JackIsted   |  last reply


Old JVC Boom Box (Antique?)

Hey guys, upon my travels the other day, I stumbled upon an electornics bin or two and one of them happened to have a few "ghetto blasters" or boom boxes as other people would call em. I should really get some better pictures, but these will have to do. I brought it home expecting it NOT to work at all, as usual. It DOES work but in a somewhat limited way. I brought it home upon the conclusion that it felt rather solidly build for such a small system and it looked the nicest out of all of them. The "Problems" sort of speak: * Well for one, the left channel doesn't work, but BOTH the speakers DO work. They both have battery compartments (6 C cells each speaker in series = 9v-ish?) and they both have "extension" cables so you can unhook the speakers and place them elsewhere, the wires are 4 strand ribbon cables and the power is also transported down these wires. I find it rather retarded, because at full length, these wires are a foot long at best?! I managed to get around this debacle for now and plugged the extension wire of the left speaker, into the plug for the right speaker, powering both speakers off one channel. This works half decent, but it doesn't go as loud as one speaker would go, and it gets distorted easier at high volumes. * The tape deck doesn't work. I hit the play button and it DOES indeed make a whirring sound, so my guess is that it needs a new rubber belt for the motor, and I have no idea where to get something that small. Did I mention that apparently the tape deck, actually comes OUT of the stereo, and theres a compartment for a set of AA batteries, thus turning it into a shiny silver 80's walkman. I'm ultimately dumfounded.. * The switches on the top of the unit, primarily the two buttons that change the "fuction" or input of the boom box, are crapping out really bad, like if I set it to radio, I have to raise one switch, and push one down, but it sometimes doesn't work, or it crackles really bad, or isn't as LOUD as it should be, but if I jiggle the switches enough, I can usually coax it into working. It's annoying at best. They are really impossible to get at and they're long pushbutton switches with a long plastic rod that pushes the switch on the board. I really doubt I can get these switches open and adjust/clean them. Should I maybe get the dremel out and but some little toggle switches? * It's missing the little faceplate for the radio selector? Oh well I can still manually tune in a radio station without knowing the number, primarily 94.5 the bull here, it's pretty hard not to miss it blaring some rock or heavy metal. I like this little unit and I wanna fix it up/tweak the crap out of it. If I could get subwoofers small enough, I would upgrade the speakers, reinforce the inside of the speaker casings with epoxy, and maybe dremel some bass ports (would that be a good idea? From what I can tell, it's a totally sealed unit, but it would probably benefit from some "bass ports"). Also, would it be beneficial to "reflow" the amp board? Like theres a board with a transformer and what appears to be a stereo transistor, but like a wide one for two channels, instead of two independant transistors for each channel. So I can only imagine if one side of the chip is working, the other side should too. Would it be a waste of time to reflow all the solder joints or no?

Topic by Punkguyta   |  last reply